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Bethany Theological Seminary 

Catholic Theological Union 

Chicago Theological Seminary 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

McCormick Theological Seminary 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 



the chicogo cluster 
oF theological schools 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1984 - 1985 



COMMON ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



1984-85 

September 26 
October 1 
November 13-15 
November 22-25 
December 15 
December 15 - la 



FALL 

Registration for Fall Quarter 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Winter Quarter 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Fall Quarter Ends 

Christmas Recess 



1985-86 



September 25 

September 30 

November 19-21 

November 28 - Dec. 1 

December 14 

December 14 - Jan. 5 



January 7 
February 26-28 
March 23 
March 23-31 



WINTER 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Spring Quarter 
Winter Quarter Ends 
Spring Recess 



January 6 

February 25-27 

March 22 

March 22-30 



April 1 

April 5 

May 21-23 

June 8 

(M/LandUC,Junel5) 



SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Good Friday Recess 
Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 
Spring Quarter Ends 



March 31 

(During Spring Recess) 

May 20-22 

June 7 

(M/LandUC,Junel4) 



1984 CALENDAR 1984 



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1985 CALENDAR 1985 



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S M T W T F S 



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S M T W T F S 
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29 30 



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T W T F S 



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S M T W T F S 
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28 29 30 



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11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
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Oacambar 1985 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 14 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



% 



Chicago Cluster 
of Theological Schools 

Jesuit House 

5554 South Woodlawn Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60637 

Phone: (312)493-6637 



Coordinator: David J. Bowman, S.J. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Foreword 3 

Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools 4 

Basic Information 4 

The Member Seminaries 5 

Common Council 9 

Faculty Area Groups 9 

Institutions with Which the Cluster Maintains Special Relations 11 

Chicago Theological Institute 11 

The Urban Academy in Chicago 12 

Center for Advanced Study of Religion and Science (CASIRAS) 12 

Spertus College of Judaica 12 

Chicago Area Colleges and Universities 13 

Cluster Services and Programs 14 

Library Services 14 

International Programs 14 

Non-Credit Language Courses 15 

Cluster Student Federation 15 

Feminist Theological Coalition 15 

Information about Course Listings 16 

Abbreviations and Numbering 16 

How Cross-Registration Works 16 

Course Descriptions 18 

Fall 18 

Biblical Studies 18 

Historical Studies 22 

Theological Studies 24 

Ethical Studies 28 

World Mission Studies 30 

Ministry Studies 30 

Winter 36 

Biblical Studies 36 

Historical Studies 40 

Theological Studies 42 

Ethical Studies 45 

World Mission Studies 47 

Ministry Studies 48 

Spring 54 

Biblical Studies 54 

Historical Studies 57 

Theological Studies 59 

Ethical Studies 62 

World Mission Studies 64 

Ministry Studies 64 



special Areas of Interest Within Course of Study 71 

Hispanic Studies 71 

Black Studies 72 

judaic Studies 73 

Women's Studies 73 

Cluster Personnel 74 

Faculty and Executive Officers 74 

Librarians 84 



FOREWORD 



An article in the New York Times 
(May 1, 1977) called the Chicago Cluster 
of Theological Schools "an experiment in 
theological education that many 
seminary experts believe to be the most 
broad-based and potentially influential 
design in the nation." In these rapidly 
changing times, the fourteen year old 
Cluster serves as a catalyst for change 
within the older institutions which are 
its members. "Constant in change" is the 
motto which expresses a dynamic by 
which the spirit of global ecumenism in- 
fluences the lives and deeds of the facul- 
ty, staff, and students of the clustered 
schools. 

In 1981 an officially authorized self- 
study was made under the direction of 
Dr. Donald E. Miller to evaluate the 
Cluster processes and programs against 
its general purposes, and against the ex- 
pectations of member schools. Of in- 
terest here is its conclusion that eighty- 
seven percent of alumni/ae and students 
had taken at least one course in another 
Cluster school and that the students 
who had done so judged the experience 
of considerable value. Two-thirds of 
reporting faculty members indicated that 
the Cluster had influenced their 
knowledge of their fields of study and 
their ecumenical interests. In fact, the 
Cluster had been a determining factor in 
their choice to work and study in the 
Chicago area. 

The attractions, indeed, are notewor- 
thy. Men and women of various ages, 
races, and nationalities. Catholic and 
Protestant, come together in numbers 
sufficient to provide opportunity for 



fruitful dialogue both in classrooms and 
in less formal housing, social and eating 
arrangements. 

Each school of the Cluster provides its 
own educational program which concen- 
trates upon preparation for professional 
ministry in a particular religious tradi- 
tion. Although maintaining allegiance to 
the schools of residence, students and 
faculty appreciate the Cluster's easy 
cross-registration procedures, the end of 
needless duplication of courses, and the 
possibilities for pertinent electives. Fears 
that the Cluster might weaken 
denominational ties appear to be un- 
founded. 

To study theology at the Cluster is ex- 
citing not simply because of the excep- 
tional gifts of students and faculty, but 
also because of the environment created 
by one of America's major metropolitan 
centers and the University of Chicago. 
The city, with its rich social, religious, 
and ethnic diversity is a learning 
laboratory, valuable and challenging for 
those who learn to minister by minister- 
ing to learn. 

This south and west side Cluster is in 
conversation with the CTI schools men- 
tioned on page 1 1 about closer coopera- 
tion in the metropolitan area. When and 
if this happens, an even richer 
ecumenical experience will be possible. 

An essential tool for cross-registration 
purposes, this catalog is meant to be a 
sign of welcome to Chicago and its 
Cluster of Theological Schools as well as 
a personal "welcome" from the 
presidents, deans, faculty, ad- 
ministrators, staff, and students. 



CHICAGO CLUSTER OF THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 
BASIC INFORMATION 



The Chicago Cluster of Theological 
Schools is an ecumenical association of 
six Protestant and one Roman Catholic 
seminaries. Its stated purpose has been to 
facilitate and coordinate education for 
ministry which would be of the highest 
quality, broadly ecumenical, and fiscally 
efficient. 

The Cluster was organized in 1970 and 
incorporated as a not-for-profit corpora- 
tion in 1971. All Cluster schools are 
members of the Association of 
Theological Schools in the United States 
and Canada. Each of the six Protestant 
schools is affiliated with a corresponding 
denomination. The Roman Catholic 
school officially represents or serves 
twenty religious orders of men and a 
large number of communities of women. 

Two of the seven member schools are 
located on contiguous campuses in west 
suburban Oak Brook and Lombard. Five 
schools are grouped closely together on 
the south side of Chicago adjacent to the 
University of Chicago, with which they 
maintain relationships on various levels: 
bi-registration, a coordinated 
M.Div./Ph.D. program, faculty interac- 
tion, library and physical education 
facilities. 

The Cluster's diverse and extensive 
networks of resources for theological 



education are unparalleled in the 
Midwest and are among the most 
outstanding in North America. The 
seven Cluster schools offer a variety of 
academic and professional degrees at the 
master's and doctoral levels, and pro- 
grams of continuing education for clergy 
and laity. The almost 1,500 Cluster 
students have access to resources such as 
those represented by its large and diverse 
faculty; over 500 courses annually; 
library collections of over 900,000 
volumes and about 3,000 currently 
received periodicals; and contemporary 
electronic media equipment (including 
portable and studio video capabilities). 
Several schools maintain bookstores. 

Related resources available to the 
Cluster include the Urban Academy, the 
Spertus College of Judaica, and five 
other Chicago-area theological schools 
(pp. 1 1-13). Cluster students may draw on 
these together with the vast resources of 
numerous institutions of higher learning 
and innumerable organizations and 
agencies of a religious, humanitarian, 
cultural and scientific character in 
Chicago and its suburbs. 

The Cluster itself does not offer 
courses nor grant degrees. Application 
for study within the Cluster is made to 
individual member schools. 



THE MEMBER SEMINARIES 
BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Bethany education is shaped by Church of the Brethren concerns in such areas as 
peace, discipleship, and servanthood. It seeks to provide a community of scholarship 
and love where insistence upon academic excellence is balanced by concern for personal 
growth. Curricular design includes peer accountability groupings oriented toward in- 
tegration of heritage and ministerial competencies. 

President 

Dean of Faculty 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Dean of Students 

Treasurer and Business Manager 

Director of Development 

Director of Church Relations 

Registrar 

Degree Programs 




M.A.Th. 

M.Div. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 

Butterfield and Meyers Road 

Oak Brook, Illinois 60S21 

(312)620-2200 



Warren F. Groff 
Graydon F. Snyder 
Donald E.Miller 
John J. Cassel 
John A. Eichelberger 
E. Floyd McDowell 
Duane L. Steiner 
N. Geraldine Plunkett 
Time Beyond A.B. 
Normally Required 

2 ydars 

3 years 



year,^ 



CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 



A collaborative school serving twenty religious orders, founded to promote diverse 
theological and ministerial traditions within the Roman Catholic Church. Emphasis on 
preparation for ministry, hence flexible academic pattern augmented by strong field 
education programs. Other special features: fully individualized M.A. Program; World 
Mission Program designed to prepare American and foreign students to minister in 
other cultures. Programs open to all serious students, men and women. 



President 

Vice President and Dean 

Treasurer and Bi(.sinc',s,s Manager 

Director of Development 

Dean of Students 

Registrar and Director of Admissions 

Director of M.Dix'. Program 

Director of M.A. Program 

Director of M.T.S. Program 

Degree Programs: 



M.T.S. 
M.A. in Theology 
M.Div. 

M.Div. with Mission Specialization 
M.Div. with Wc>rd and Worship Specialization 
5401 South Cornell Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60615 
(312) 324-8000 



John E. Linnan, C.S.V. 

Robert J. Schreiter, C.PP.S. 

Mary C. Bernstein, R. S.C.J. 

Thomas F. Wogan 

Steven Murphy 

Raymond F. Diesbourg, M.S.C. 

JohnPaulSzura,O.S.A. 

John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

2 years 



Z years 
3-4 years 
3-4 years 
3-4 years 




CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



An ecumenical Seminary related to the United Church of Christ. A style fostering 
rigorous theological inquiry and development of students' own intellectual and profes- 
sional integrity in an atmosphere of diversity and freedom. The basic professional degree 
program is the three year Master of Divinity, but the Master of Arts in Religious Studies 
may be awarded at the end of the second year as a terminal master's degree. The 
post'M.Div. Doctor of Ministry is available full or part-time for students with experience 
in ministry, or the desire for more focused professional doctoral work immediately 
following the M.Div. Joint programs with pastoral care institutions are available. The 
academic doctorate is awarded in connection with other cluster schools in several areas. 




5757 Stiuth University Avenue 

Chicago, IllincMs 60637 

(312)752-5757 



Acting President 

Academic Dean 

Registrar and Director of Professional Studie: 

Director of Field Education 

Chaplain and Coordinator of Student Life 

and Community Activities 
Director of Recruitment, Admissions, 

and Financial Aid 
Vice-President for Business Affairs 
Vice-President for Dexelopinent 
Degree Programs 

M.A. in Religious Studies 

M.Div. 

M.Th. 

D.Min. 

Ph.D. 



Betty C. Reneker 
Yoshio Fukuyama 
Cheryl W. Miller 
William R. Myers 
M. Elizabeth Bacon 

Richarci D. Lewis 

Randall Vaughn 

Stephen]. Davidson 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

2 years 

3 years 

4 years 
4-5 years 

6 years 



LUTHERAN SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AT CHICAGO 



Preparation for professional ministry in the church, advanced studies in ministry, 
academic study of theology. Curriculum features strong accent upon study of the tradi- 
tions of the Church and a comprehensive field work program. Now including also 
resources of Christ Seminary-Seminex. 

President 

Dean 

Vice President for Development 

Vice President for Administration and Finance 

Dean of Students 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Director of Doctor of Ministry Program 

Director of Continuing Education 

Director of Admissions and Registrar 

Degree Prtigrams: 



S-^^\ 



^ 




1100 East 55th Street 

Chicago, Illinois 60615 

(312) 667-3500 



M.A. 

M.Div. 

Th.M. 

Th.D. 

D.Mm, 



(3 years in ministry prerequisite) 



William E. Lesher 
Franklin Sherman 
Donovan J. Palmquist 
Joseph L. Rodrick 
Jean Bozeman 
Philip Hefner 
Robert L. Conrad 
David E. Deppe 
Josephine A. Brandt 
Time Beyond A.B. 
Normally Required 
2 years 

4 years 

5 years 
7 years 

10 years 



McCORMICK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



McCormick is a theological center for the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. It 
also welcomes many students from outside this denomination. It focuses its resources on 
education for the ministry, emphasizing both pre-professional (M.A.T.S. & M.Div.) 
and professional (D.Min.) studies. Its programs in Hispanic Studies, Women's Studies, 
and Urban Ministry, its dual competency programs in Social Work and other fields, 
and its emphasis on internationalization add to its other offerings. Students are en- 
couraged to plan, with advice, their own courses of study. 



President 

Dean of the Seminary 

Asst. Dean & Registrar 

Director of the Doctor of Ministry Program 

Dean of Student Life 

Vice President for Seminary Relations 

Vice President for Business 

Degree Programs: 



Jack L. Stotts 

Lewis S. Mudge 

Shirley S. Dudley 

Robert C. Worley 

Pauline Coffman 

Raymond A. Bowden 

Anthony Ruger 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

2 years 

3 years 

4 years 
8 years 



M.A. in Theological Studies 

M.Div.* 

M.Div. /M.S.W. 

D.Min. (2 years in ministry prerequisite) 

*May be taken with specialization in Hispanic Ministries. Diploma in 
Hispanic Ministries (3 year program) may be converted to M.Div. 
upon completion of baccalaureate degree. 

5555 South Woodlawn Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60637 

(312)241-7800 



McCormick 



^x»? 



Seminary 



MEADVILLE/LOMBARD THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 

Meadville/Lombard is a small, independent school whose central mission and purpose 
is preparation for ministry, primarily for parish ministry within the societies of the 
Unitarian Universalist Association. Neither Unitarian Universalist membership nor in- 
tention to seek ordination for parish ministry is a requirement for enrollment. The 
academic program leading to the M.Div. or D.Min. degree is closely related to the 
Divinity School of the University of Chicago, with which Meadville/Lombard is af- 
filiated, and may include a University A.M. degree. 

Dean and Chief Executive Gene Reeves 



Ul 



Business h/. 


anager 












Randall Vaughn 


Admissions 


Officer 


Dean oj 


StUL 


lents 






Neil H. Shadle 


Librarian 














Neil W. Gerdes 


Registrar 














Cecelia E. Smith 


Degree Pre 


igrams: 












Time Beyond A.B. 
Nornially Required 


M.Div. 














3 years 


D.Min. 














4 years 






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NORTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



The educational purpose of the Seminary is the graduate professional theological educa- 
tion of men and women for ministry. The study and application of the Scriptures is con- 
sidered foundational. The faculty promotes free discussion and inquiry in a community 
of scholars. Growth of the whole person is fostered in a caring community. The 
Seminary has an evangelical commitment, is related to the American Baptist Churches, 
U.S.A., welcomes students from all Christian traditions and encourages participation in 
ecumenical dialogue. 

President 

Dean of the Seminary 

Assistant to the President for Business Affairs 

Assistant to the President for Develol)ment 

Associate Dean 

Registrar and Director of Admissions 

Director of Field Services 

Director of Doctoral Studies 

Director of Hispanic Studies 

Director of Fiixancial Aid 

Assistant to the Dean for Recruitment 

and Community Life 
Associate Director oj Development 

for Church Relations and Alumni Affairs 
Degree Programs: 



William R. Myers 

David M. Scholer 

Edmund Powell 

Adam Baum 

EricH.Ohlmann 

VaCountess E. Johnson 

William R. Nelson 

E.Alfred Jenkins 

Osvaldo L. Mottesi 

James Jones 

Susan Cjrisham 

David L.Ni. hols 



R^orthern baptist 
theological seminary 



M.A. in Christian Education 

M.A. in Theological Studies 

M.Div. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 

660 East Butterfield Rtxid 
Lombard, Illinois 60148 
(312) 620-2101 (President's Office); (312) 620-2103 (Dean 
(312) 620-2105 (Registrar's Office) 



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Bey 


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ReL|uirec 
2 year,- 

2 year^ 

3 yearj' 
*■) year,- 



Office: 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Warren F. Groff 

John E. Linnan, C.S.V. 

Betty C. Reneker 

William E. Lesher 

Jack L. Stotts 

Gene Reeves 

William R. Myers 



Bethany Theological Seminary 
Catholic Theological Union 
Chicago Theological Seminary 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 



FACULTY AREA GROUPS (See final pages for biographical data) 



Old Testament 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. (CTU) 

Reidar Bjornard (NBTS) 

Robert Boling (MTS) 

Edward Campbell (MTS) 

Wesley Fuerst (LSTC) 

Leslie Hoppe, O.F.M. (CTU) 

Ralph W. Klein (LSTC) 

Andre LaCocque (CTS) 

Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) 

Walter Michel (LSTC) 

David Nasgowitz (BTS/NBTS - Adj.) 

Robert Neff (BTS - Vis.) 

Samuel Pagan (MTS- Adj.) 

Hayim Goren Perelmuter (CTU) 

Eugene Roop (BTS) 

Carroll Stuhlmueller, C.P. (CTU) 

New Testament 

Adela Collins (MTS) 

Frederick W. Danker (LSTC) 

Norman Ericson (NBTS - Adj.) 

Richard Gardner (BTS - Vis.) 

Earle Hilgert (MTS) 

Nancy Holsey (BTS/NBTS - Adj.) 

Estella Boggs Horning (BTS - Vis.) 

Robert Karris, O.F.M. (CTU) 

Edgar Krentz (LSTC) 

Eugene LaVerdiere, S.S.S. (CTU - Adj. 

Wilhelm Linss (LSTC) 

Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) 

Carolyn Osiek, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 

Eugene Roop (BTS) 

David Scholer (NBTS) 

Robin Scroggs (CTS) 

Donald Senior, C.P. (CTU) 

Graydon Snyder (BTS) 

Arthur Voobus (LSTC - Emeritus) 

Laurence Welborn (MTS) 



David Wieand (BTS - Emeritus) 

Church History 

Paula Datsko Barker (MTS - Adj. 
Dorothy Bass (CTS) 
Dale Brown (BTS) 
Donald Dayton (NBTS) 
Donald Durnbaugh (BTS) 
Robert Fischer (LSTC) 
John Charles Godbey (M/L) 
Kurt K. Hendel (LSTC) 
Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D. (CTU) 
Jose Nieto (MTS - Adj.) 
Eric Ohlmann (NBTS) 
V. Bruce Rigdon (MTS) 
Theodore Ross, S.J. (CTU) 
Thomas Schafer (MTS) 
James Scherer (LSTC) 
Murray Wagner (BTS) 

Theology 

Robert W. Bertram (LSTC) 
David Bowman, S.J. (CCTS) 
Carl E. Braaten (LSTC) 
Dale Brown (BTS) 
Ralph Burhoe (M/L - Emeritus) 
John Burkhart (MTS) 
William Burrows (CTU) 
George C. L. Cummings (CTS) 
Donald Dayton (NBTS) 
Thomas Finger (NBTS) 
Warren Groff (BTS) 
Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. (CTU) 
Philip Hefner (LSTC) 
Perry LeFevre (CTS) 
John Linnan, C.S.V. (CTU) 
Lewis Mudge (MTS) 
Thomas Parker (MTS) 
Albert Pero, Jr. (LSTC) 



Gene Reeves (M/L) 

Robert Schreiter, C.PP.S. (CTU) 

Susan Thistlethwaite (CTS) 

Robert Tobias (LSTC) 

Warren Young (NBTS - Emeritus) 

Ethics 

Karen L. Bloomquist (LSTC) 

Dale Brown (BTS) 

Raymond Diesbourg, M.S.C. (CTU) 

J. Ronald Engel (M/L) 

Archimedes Fornasari, M. C.C.J. (CTU) 

Ismael Garcia (MTS) 

Donald Miller (BTS) 

Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) 

Thomas Nairn, O.F.M. (CTU) 

John Pawlikowski, O.S.M. (CTU) 

W. Widick Schroeder (CTS) 

Franklin Sherman (LSTC) 

Jack Stotts (MTS) 

Paul Wadell, C.P. (CTU) 

World Mission 

Raymond Bakke (NBTS) 

Benigno Beltran, S.V.D. (CTU - Vis.) 

Claude Marie Barbour (CTU) 

Dale Brown (BTS) 

William J. Danker (LSTC - Emeritus) 

Archimedes Fornasari, M. C.C.J. (CTU) 

David G. Gelzer (MTS-Vis.) 

Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp. (CTU) 

Andres Guerrero (CTU) 

David Lindberg (LSTC) 

Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D. (CTU) 

Thomas Reynolds, S.S.C. (CTU - Vis.) 

James Scherer (LSTC) 

David L. Vikner (LSTC - Adj.) 

Ministry: Its Nature and Practice 

Carol Allen (MTS) 
Ruben Armendariz (MTS) 
Raymond Bakke (NBTS) 
Pauline Coffman (MTS - Adj.) 
Carl Dudley (MTS) 
W. Dow Edgerton (CTS - Vis.) 
Hugh Halverstadt (MTS) 
Axel Kildegaard (LSTC) 
George Magnuson (MTS) 
Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) 
Robert Navarro (LSTC) 
Robert Worley (MTS) 



Pastoral Care 

Philip Anderson (CTS) 
Homer Ashby, Jr. (MTS) 
Paul Bauermeister (LSTC) 
Robert Mallonee, S.V.D. (CTU) 
Marie McCarthy, S.P. (CTU) 
Robert Moore (CTS) 
James Poling (BTS) 
Paul Swanson (LSTC) 
George Taylor (NBTS) 

Supervised Ministry 

John J. Cassel (BTS) 
David Lindberg (LSTC) 
William R. Nelson (NBTS) 
Neil Shadle (M/L) 
John Szura, O.S.A. (CTU) 

Worship and Preaching 

Cecilio Arrastia (MTS - Adj.) 

Mark P. Bangert (LSTC) 

Fred Baumer, C.PP.S. (CTU) 

John David Burton (BTS) 

Elam Davies (MTS-Adj.) 

David E. Deppe (LSTC) 

Vicky Schreiber Dill (BTS- Adj.) 

Nancy Faus (BTS) 

Earle W. Fike (BTS - Adj.) 

Ernest Henau, C.P. (CTU - Vis.) 

Kathleen Hughes, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 

Ralph Keifer (CTU) 

Paul Manz (LSTC) 

Morris Niedenthal (LSTC) 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. (CTU) 

Jay Rochelle (LSTC) 

Don Wardlaw (MTS) 

Gail Wilson (MTS) 

Gary Wilson (NBTS) 

Religious Education 

Jean Bozeman (LSTC) 
Elizabeth Caldwell (MTS) 
Robert Conrad (LSTC) 
E. Alfred Jenkins (NBTS) 
Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. (CTU) 
Donald Miller (BTS) 
Wilda Morris (NBTS) 
William R. Myers (CTS) 

Canon Law 

John Huels, O.S.M. (CTU) 



10 



INSTITUTIONS WITH WHICH THE CLUSTER 
MAINTAINS SPECIAL RELATIONS 



CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE (CTI) 

The Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools enjoys a cordial and fruitful working rela- 
tionship with the Chicago Theological Institute (CTI), which is a consortium of five 
theological schools located in the northern metropolitan area. 

By common agreement between the two consortia, students other than those pursu- 
ing academic doctorates in each member school enjoy tuition-free cross-registration 
privileges in all other member schools. Most Cluster students thus have broad func- 
tional access without additional fees to significant curricular resources which collectively 
represent a richness and diversity of ecumenical perspectives and theological traditions 
unduplicated in any other local setting. 

The procedures for cross-registering into CTI schools are identical to those for cross- 
registering into Cluster schools. Information regarding CTI course descriptions and 
schedules is available in the office of the dean and registrar at each Cluster school. Such 
information may also be obtained from the office of the dean or registrar of the respec- 
tive CTI schools: 



Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
(United Methodist) 

2121 Sheridan Road 
Evanston, Illinois 60201 
(312) 273-2511 

North Park Theological Seminary 
(Evangelical Covenant) 
5125 North Spaulding Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60625 

(312) 583-2700 

Seabury-Western Theological Seminary 
(Episcopal) 

2122 Sheridan Road 
Evanston, Illinois 60201 
(312) 328-9300 

St. Mary of the Lake Seminary 
(Roman Catholic) 
Mundelein, Illinois 60060 
(312) 566-6401 

Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 
(Evangelical Free) 
2045 Half Day Road 
Deerfield, Illinois 60015 
(312) 945-8800 



President — Dr. Neal Fisher 
Dean-Dr. Wolfgang M. W. Roth 



President — Dr. William R. Hausman 
Dean — Dr. Robert K. Johnston 



Interim President and Dean — 
Rt. Rev. William A. Dimmick 



President — 

The Very Rev. James P. Keleher 
Dean — Rev. Edward J. Stokes, S.J. 



President— Dr. Kenneth M. Meyer 
Dean-Dr. Walter Kaiser 



n 



THE URBAN ACADEMY IN CHICAGO 

In 1982 the Urban Academy in Chicago was organized by twelve Chicago area 
theological schools, twelve denominational judicatories and six church related mission 
agencies to address pressing urban issues that have emerged in a rapidly developing 
technological world and the need to define and model appropriate religious leadership 
roles. Throughout the year committees of the Urban Academy sponsor educational pro- 
grams for theological students, clergy and laity, focusing on public issues and ministries 
in the urban milieu. 

Programs sponsored by the Urban Academy have included a weekend "plunge" focus- 
ing on the Energy issue, a ten week summer urban program on "Unemployment and the 
Future of Work" and an overview series focusing on the Black, Hispanic and Asian com- 
munities of Chicago, Women in Ministry and Chicago Politics. Academy programs are 
open to all seminary students and may be scheduled as adjuncts to regular courses or as 
additional educational opportunities for students. 

The Urban Academy Summer Program is accepted as course and/or field education 
credit by the member seminaries of the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools. Pro- 
cedures and modes of payment differ in the individual schools. Students are responsible 
to determine what particulars regarding payment and procedures apply at their own 
schools. 

Urban Academy programs provide students with many opportunities to meet, study 
and work with students and faculty from other seminaries, Chicago area church and 
community leaders and to acquaint themselves with the diversity of people who live in 
the Chicago metropolitan area. 

For further information, contact Ms. Donna Schaper, Director, Urban Academy, 941 
Lawrence Ave., Chicago, IL 60640. Phone: (312) 784-6633. 



CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY IN RELIGION AND SCIENCE 
(CASIRAS) 

This is an independent incorporated institution with an effective working relationship 
with the Cluster. The Director is Ralph Wendell Burhoe, recent recipient of the 
Templeton Award. 

The purpose of such a cooperative relationship is to achieve a greater integration be- 
tween the scientific and religious models or images concerning the nature and destiny o( 
humans. Dimensions of CASIRAS' work include seminars, courses, conferences, sym- 
posia and guided research as well as co-sponsorship of Zygon: Journal of Religion and 
Science. 

For further information contact Professor Philip Hefner, 1100 East 55th Street, 
Chicago, Illinois 60615. Phone: (312) 753-0725. 



SPERTUS COLLEGE OF JUDAICA 

In 1978 the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools and the Spertus College of 
Judaica, located in the Chicago Loop, signed an agreement to provide for an exchange 
of services. Formalized was an already working relationship of free access to libraries. 
More importantly, the agreement provides for free cross-registration for students from 
the Cluster into appropriate Spertus courses and vice versa. Exchange of faculty be- 



12 



tween Cluster Schools and Spertus College is also recognized by this agreement as ap- 
propriate. 

Address: 618 S. Michigan Avenue President: Dr. David Weinstein 

Chicago, IL 60605 Dean: Dr. Warren Bargad 

Phone: (312)922-9013 



CHICAGO AREA COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 

In addition to certain informal cooperative agreements which the Chicago Cluster of 
Theological Schools and its member institutions enjoy with various colleges and univer- 
sities in the metropolitan area, some Cluster schools have formal relationships with 
various local institutions of higher education. Through such relationships students at 
the respective seminaries enjoy correspondingly expanded and enriched educational of- 
ferings as well as a variety of significant benefits which may include participation in 
joint-degree programs; tuition reduction for course work; library privileges; and access 
to health services, cultural activities, and recreation facilities. 

The local colleges and universities with whom the respective Cluster schools enjoy 
such relationships are the following: 

Loyola University (MTS) 

University of Chicago (CTS, CTU, LSTC, M/L, MTS) 

University of Illinois at Chicago (MTS) 

George Williams College (NBTS, BTS) 

Rosary College (MTS) 

Wheaton College (NBTS) 

Full particulars on these several relationships may be obtained by consulting the 
catalogs of the respective Cluster schools. 



13 



CLUSTER SERVICES AND PROGRAMS 



LIBRARY SERVICES 



The Cluster supports a vigorous 
library program which provides many 
benefits to students and faculty. The 
combined Cluster library collections 
comprise over 900,000 volumes and 
represent one of the largest collections 
among the theological consortia in the 
nation. A Union List of 2,970 current 
periodicals assist Cluster library users in 
locating desired titles. 

In July 1983 the Library Council of the 
Chicago Association of Theological 
Schools was formed. In addition to the 
Cluster libraries the libraries of North 
Park Theological Seminary, Trinity- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary, and 
the United Library of Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary and of 
Seabury-Western Theological Seminary 
are also members. Mr. Newland Smith of 
Seabury-Western and Garrett 
Evangelical Theological Seminary chairs 
this council. 

The loan of books and periodicials be- 
tween these libraries is facilitated by a 
courier system (three times weekly). 
Students and faculties of the member 
schools also have direct access to all of 
the libraries. A task force of the Library 
Council meets regularly to coordinate 
joint acquisition programs for books, 
periodicals, and monograph series. The 
Cluster libraries and two of the other 
libraries participate in the services of 
OCLC, Inc., a nationally linked, com- 
puter based cataloguing operation. 

All Cluster libraries belong to the Il- 
linois Library and Information Network 
(ILLINET) which provides access to 
statewide library resources as well as the 
bibliographic services of OCLC, Inc. 

Each library has its special strengths 
and special collections. For a brief 
description of the individual libraries, see 
the separate brochure, A Guide to the 
Libraries of the Chicago Association of 
Theological Schools. 



The Ecumenical Parish Resource 
Center (EPRC), administered by the 
Jesuit/Krauss/McCormick Library and 
located at LSTC, provides a variety of 
current resources for use in church pro- 
grams. The Center's resources include 
more than 50 religious education cur- 
ricula; a special collection of materials 
pertaining to the various functions of the 
congregation, including worship, 
stewardship, church organization, 
education and simulation games. Along 
with such resources, the staff of the 
Center provides unique services in 
assisting denominational officials, 
pastors, seminary students and layper- 
sons in developing meaningful programs 
for their judicatories, congregations, 
groups or classes. Interested parties are 
invited to contact the Center for further 
information. 

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS 

Since its conception the Cluster has 
embodied a deepening commitment to 
the internationalization of theological 
education. A number of Cluster schools. 
Catholic and Protestant, maintain their 
own internal programs emphasizing in- 
ternational concerns and relationships. 
A sub-Cluster Committee on Interna- 
tional Programs unites these schools in 
planning Cluster-wide international 
events. 

The commitment to internationaliza- 
tion has expression in course offerings 
(see "World Mission Studies" sections o( 
this catalog), seminary-sponsored pro- 
grams for study and internship abroad, 
and faculty-student exchanges with 
theological schools around the world. 
During each academic quarter bi-weekly 
intercultural forums are held on subjects 
of international concern. 

The principal Cluster-wide event spon- 
sored by the Committee on Interna- 



14 



tional Programs is the annual World 
Mission Institute (WMI), scheduled to be 
held in April, 1985. The 1984 Mission 
Institute featured outstanding interna- 
tional speakers and resource persons and 
dealt with the subject, "1984 is Now: 
Renewing Faith in Humanity." Staffing 
WMI in 1984 is Professor William 
Danker of LSTC; Phone: (312) 753-0753. 

NON-CREDIT LANGUAGE 
COURSES 

The Cluster assists Coordinator 
Gerlinde Miller in offering non-credit 
courses in Spanish, French, German and 
Latin each quarter of the academic year 
as warranted by student interest. The aim 
of the courses is to assist students to 
achieve facility in reading theological 
literature in the respective languages. 
Such facility is frequently employed to 
fulfill language requirements for certain 
degree programs. A nominal fee is charg- 
ed. For further information contact 
Gerlmde Miller; Phone: (312) 363-1384. 

CLUSTER STUDENT FEDERATION 

The Cluster Student Federation (CSF) 
was born in the winter of 1982 at a 
Cluster Student Assembly Day. It grew 
out of a recognition that an association 
of theological schools does not by itself 
create an ecumenical learning communi- 
ty. Students from member schools must 
find ways to communicate with each 
other, learn from the diverse religious 
heritages represented, and participate in 
the life of the Cluster in order to share in 
the impact of ecumenism. 

In addition to the annual Assembly 
Day, the Cluster Student Federation 
sponsors ecumenical worship services, 
monthly spirituality retreats at St. 
Stephen's House, monthly First Friday 
Lunches, Fall and Spring blood drives, 
and social events for Cluster students. 
Joint action on issues of peace and social 
justice is made possible through the 
Social Action Coordinating Committee. 
A monthly newsletter, highlighting 



ecumenical events and ideas, also 
facilitates communication among 
students and makes it possible for them 
to take part in the activities o( Cluster 
schools. 

Supported entirely by student fees, the 
Cluster Student Federation seeks to 
represent the needs of Cluster students 
as a unified body and also the needs of 
individual student groups, such as 
minorities and women. Two CSF 
representatives elected from each school 
and one CSF representative each elected 
by women, Hispanic, Black, and Interna- 
tional students respectively, serve on the 
Representative Council, which meets 
monthly. Meetings are open to all. 

All students are members of the 
Cluster Student Federation by virtue of 
their enrollment in a Cluster school and 
are encouraged to participate fully in 
CSF activities. Further information is 
available from the Cluster office or from 
the CSF representatives. Sharon 
Hunter-Smith of MTS and Booker 
Vance of LSTC co-chair CSF in 1983-84. 

FEMINIST THEOLOGICAL 
COALITION 

In the fall of 1980, a group of women in 
theology and in ministry in the wider 
Chicago area began serious discussion of 
a program of feminist theology and 
ministerial preparation. The Cluster 
Women's Caucus consisting of one facul- 
ty or administrative person appointed by 
the president of each school established 
the Feminist Theological Coalition 
(FTC) for the purpose of encouraging the 
ecumenical and academic concerns of 
female seminarians and to propose sup- 
plemental courses in women's studies. In 
conjuction with the Urban Academy of 
Chicago, the FTC offers a summer in- 
ternship program for women 
seminarians in city ministry under the 
supervision of female pastors. For details 
contact Gretchen Loeppke, Phone: (312) 
475-4251 or Carol Allen, MTS, Phone: 
(312) 241-7800. 



15 



INFORMATION ABOUT COURSE LISTINGS 



ABBREVIATIONS AND 
NUMBERING 

Each course number is preceded by the 

initials of the institution by which it is 

offered. 

BTS - Bethany Theological 

Seminary 
CTU - Catholic Theological Union 
CTS — Chicago Theological 

Seminary 
LSTC - Lutheran School of 

Theology at Chicago 
M/L - Meadville/Lombard 

Theological School 
MTS — McCormick Theological 

Seminary 
NBTS - Northern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 

Most Cluster schools employ the follow- 
ing lettering system for designating the 
field of each course of study: 



B 


- Biblical Studies 


H 


— Historical Studies 


T 


— Theological Studies 


E 


— Ethical Studies 


W 


— World Mission Studies 


M 


— Ministry Studies 


I 


— Interdisciplinary/Integrative 




Studies 


Chicago Theological Seminary 


employs 


the following lettering system 


for designating the field of each course of 


study: 




CH 


— Christian Heritage 


TEC 


— Theology, Ethics, and Con- 




temporary Culture 


CM 


— Christian Ministries 



The Cluster schools employ a common 
numbering system for designating the 



level of each course of study. The levels 
of study are as follows: 
300-399 - Introductory 
400-499 - Intermediate 
500-599 - Advanced 
600-699 - Doctoral (In-Ministry 
D.Min., Th.D.) 

The student should note that, 
although this numbering system pro- 
vides a general guide, the precise 
significance of each category of numbers 
differs from school to school. 

TBA (To be arranged) refers to pro- 
fessor or time for a course. The standard 
abbreviations (M, T, W, Th, F), are used 
for days of the week. Unless indicated, 
each entry is a full course valued at 3 or 4 
quarter hours credit. 

Tutorial or Independent Study may be 
pursued in most of the areas of study, 
upon request of the students and ap- 
proval of the instructor and the dean of 
the schools involved. 



HOW CROSS-REGISTRATION 
WORKS 

Students of any of the Cluster schools 
may take courses from any of the other 
Cluster schools directly and with no add- 
ed charges. This operational relationship 
also exists between the Cluster and the 
Spertus College of Judaica and between 
the Cluster and the Chicago Theological 
Institute. Special cross-registering ar- 
rangements also exist between certain of 
the Cluster schools and other colleges 
and universities in the Chicago area. 
Details about these arrangements can be 
obtained from individual schools. 

Exceptions to this process of cross- 
registration exist a) during the summer 



16 



quarter when tuition is normally paid to 
the school offering the course; b) for 
D.Min. courses other than Pastoral Care 
and Counseling; c) in certain courses of 
limited enrollment. The Cluster schools 
reserve the right to limit enrollment in 
certain courses for pedagogical reasons, 
and to set their own policies for the ad- 
mission of students from other schools to 
such courses. Courses limited to small 
numbers because they are taught in 
seminar or practicum style are so in- 



dicated in this Announcements. Students 
are advised that certain other courses 
may at times grow so large that enroll- 
ment in them must be restricted in the 
registration process or during the first 
week of class. Every effort will be made 
to inform students of this possibility as 
early as possible through the Registrars 
of their own schools. It is strongly recom- 
mended that students planning to enroll 
in courses which may be limited make 
alternative course selections in advance. 



17 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



FALL 1984 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

OLD AND NEW TESTAMENT 

L GENERAL 

BTS B-310 

Introduction to Biblical Languages 

This course is aimed at providing the student with 
an introductory knowledge in both Hebrew and 
Greek. Its primary purpose is to enable individuals 
to use an interlinear Bible and to do word studies 
using the Hebrew and Greek words. 
Roop WF 1-2:20 Fall 

CTU B-526 

Rabbinic Judaism and the Early Church 

Designed to deepen the student's understanding of 
the relationship of Christianity to rabbinic Judaism 
and to develop a capacity to interpret Jewish 
sources, this seminar will serve as an opportunity to 
examine the nature of rabbinic Judaism and the 
rabbinic mind through an exploration of pertinent 
talmudic and midrashic material. 
Perelmuter M 3'5:30pm Fall 



OLD TESTAMENT 
L INTRODUCTORY 

BTS B-323 

Introduction to the Old Testament 

The goal of this course is to give the student an in- 
troduction to the history and thought of Israel in 
Old Testament times. The student will read a 
history of the life and literature of Israel plus other 
student selected materials. 
Roop WF 8-9:20 Fall 

CTU B-300 A&B 

Old Testament Introduction 

Analysis of the phenomenon of Sacred Scripture as 
a religious norm, its manifestations in ancient Israel 
and early Judaism and its role in the faith and life 



of the Church; an introduction to some of the 

literary and theological issues involved in Biblical 

interpretation. 

Hoppe Sec. AMW 12-1:15 Fall 

Hoppe Sec. B M 7-9:30pm Fall 

Bergant MW 9-10:15 Winter 

LSTC B-310 

Old Testament Studies I 

Introduction to the Pentateuch and survey of 
Israel's history through the United Monarchy, with 
particular attention to the problems of Exodus and 
Conquest. Three sessions and a discussion sec- 
tion to be arranged. 

Fuerst MW 1-2:15 Fall 

Klein MWF 9-9:50 Fall 

Michel MWF 9-9:50 Fall 

MTS B-301 

The Yahwist Revolution: Introduction to the 

Old Testament 

Introduction to Israel's antecedents, birth as a peo- 
ple, and early life as a nation, focusing on Genesis 
to I Samuel. Attention is given to appropriate 
critical methods for general Old Testament study, 
and to the content and theology of Israel's early 
epic traditions and law. 
Campbell MW 10-11:50 Fall 

NBTS B-323 

Old Testament I: 

Archaeology, History and Content 

This course is an introduction to the history of an- 
cient Israel. Attention is given to relevant ar- 
chaeological work done in the Near East and to the 
content of the historical books of the Old Testa- 
ment. 
Bjornard WF 10:40-12 Fall 

NBTS B-324H 

Antiguo Testamento II: Literatura de Israel 

Este curso investiga las varias formas de la 
literatura del Antiguo Testamento, y considera 



18 



New Testament 



Old Testament 



varias cuestiones criticas en cuanto al estudio de la 
rnisma. Entraremos en ciertas partes de libros 
representativos para obtener un perfil del libro y 
para entender mejor su contenido y su mensaje. 
This course, taught in Spanish, investigates the 
various forms of the literature of the Old Testa- 
ment and considers various critical questions with 
regard to it. We will study certain parts of represen- 
tative books to obtain a profile of the book and to 
better understand its content and message. 
Fuerst M 7-9:40 Fall 



IL CANONICAL CORPUS 

CTU B-405 
Prophets and Priests 

A study of the Deuteronomistic Corpus which will 

focus on the role and functions of ancient Israel's 

official and charismatic leaders in order to probe 

the meaning of office and vocation in the life of the 

Church. 

Bergant TTh 1 0:30- 11:45 Fall 

Hoppe M 3-5; 7'8:45pm, 4/1-5/15 Spring 

CTSCH-415 

Jewish Approaches to BibUcal Exegesis 

in Concept & in Practice 

The course will deal with fundamentals of Jewish 
beliefs, highlighting Jewish views of the Bible and 
its place in determining religious authority for the 
various denominations comprising Judaism today. 
The concepts of Law and Midrash (homiletic 
literature) will also be explored and contrasted with 
Christian approaches. We will also select sample 
portions of the Torah and explore their exegetical 
development in the form of both Law and Midrash 
from the time oi the Talmud and Rabbinic period 
to the present. 
Eckstein M 6:30-9:30p.m. Fall 

LSTCB-512 
Studies in Jeremiah 

Consideration of the content and message of the 
book, with attention given to critical problems and 
issues affecting Old Testament prophecy in general. 
(Prereq: LSTC B-310 and B-311 or equiv.) 
Fuerst TF 1-2:15 Fall 

NETS B-425 

Interpretation of the Book of Hosea 

The book is studied especially for the tension be- 
tween conventional language and revelatory in- 
sights. Attention is given to text and form, to 
literature and redaction, to language and theology. 
Bjornard W 2:30-5:10 Fall 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 

LSTC B-616 

The Old Testament and Northwest 

Semitic Grammar 

A study of the impact of the insights gained from 
Northwest Semitic grammar (including Ugaritic, 
since 1929, and Eblaite, since 1974) for the 
understanding of Biblical Hebrew, as well as for the 
task of teaching and preaching from the Old Testa- 
ment. Examples for each area of Hebrew lex- 
icography and grammar will be investigated. 
(For post M.Div. students. Admission of others by 
consent of instructor. Prereq: Hebrew.) 
Michel MW 1-2:15 Fall 



IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

BTS/NBTSB-311a 
Hebrew 1 

This course is the first quarter of a two quarter se- 
quence intended to teach Hebrew grammar and 
syntax inductively from the Masoretic text of 
Genesis 1-8 so that the student can independently 
read Biblical Hebrew with suitable reference aids. 
This course is offered jointly by BTS and NBTS. 
Nasgowitz TWF 1-1:50 Fall 

CTU B-326 
Intermediate Hebrew 

A reading course for those who have had an in- 
troductory course in Hebrew, (one credit) 
Perelmuter TBA Fall 



NEW TESTAMENT 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTS CH-321 

The Synoptic Gospels 

A study of the thought of the authors of the Gospel 
and the oral traditions which they used. An at- 
tempt will be made to discover which traditions 
give evidence of the authentic historical ministry of 
Jesus. 
Scroggs TTh 11-12:20 Fall 



IL BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B-530 
Johannine Theology 

Through exegetical studies in the Gospel of John, 
the nature of Johannine theology will be examined. 



19 



New Testament 



Comparisons will be made with Pauline theology 
and the synoptics. An acquaintance with the 
synoptic material will be a prerequisite. 
Snyder T 7-9:45p.m. Fall 

CTU B-435 

The Gospel According to Luke 

An analysis o{ the entire Gospel and its major 
theological themes. Particular attention will be 
given to the evangelist's role as interpreter of the 
Jesus tradition for a missionary community. The 
course will consider the theological and ministerial 
relevance of Luke's message for such questions as 
poor and rich, church leadership, and prayer. 
Karris MW 3-4:15 Fall 

CTU B-440 

The Gospel According to John 

The gospel will be studied according to its distinc- 
tive style and theology, its overall structure and 
content. Key sections will be used to highlight such 
major Johannine motifs as religious symbolism, 
sacraments, community and spirituality. 
Senior T 7-9:30 p.m. Fall 

Karris W 3-5; 7-8:45 p.m., 4/1-5/15 Spring 

CTU B-452 

Pauline Theology and Writings 

The life and thought of Paul in his cultural and 
theological setting. Study of such Pauline motifs as 
law and freedom, charism and Spirit, death and 
resurrection. Church and apostleship - and their 
import for the contemporary church. 
Karris TTh 10:30-11:45 Fall 

Karris TTh 1 0:30- 1 1 :45 Winter 

LSTC B-488 

Hebrews through Revelation 

For the student who wishes to complete the study 
of the New Testament (after Gospel Tradition and 
Pauline Tradition) with a course covering the re- 
maining books. 
Linss MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

LSTC B-549 
First Corinthians 

Interpretation of the Greek text in the light of the 
social, cultural, and religious context. Stress is plac- 
ed on the unique character of Corinthian Chris- 
tianity and Pauline response to it. (Prereq: LSTC 
R-332 or equiv.) 
Kremz MWF 11-11:50 Fall 



LSTC B-627 

Studies in the Apocalypse 

Research relating to selected aspects of the cultural 
and cultic contexts in which the Book of Revela- 
tion was produced. (For post M.Div. students. Ad- 
mission of others by consent of the instructor.) 
F. Danker T 2:30-5 Fall 

MTS B'402 

The Acts of the Apostles 

An exegesis course. Some of the themes with which 
the course will be concerned: How does Luke mold 
together tradition, history and his own original 
composition to reflect a developing theology and 
mission in the first century? What contributions 
does he himself make to the early church's 
understanding of itself? What can this mean for 
Christians today? 
Hilgen T 7-9:50 p.m. Fall 

NBTSB-331H 

The Synoptic Gospels 

This course, taught in Spanish, studies the synoptic 
gospels as accounts of the life of Jesus with a 
theological agenda of their own. The aim is to 
analyze the synoptic material as Gospel. 
Weiss Th 6-8:40 p.m. Fall 

NBTS B-332H 
The Pauline Epistles 

The goal of this course is to master the content of 

Paul's letters and to understand the basic 

theological concerns in the ministry of the great 

apostle. Special attention will be given to Gala- 

tians, Romans and I Corinthians. Taught in 

Spanish. 

Weiss F 8-9:20 and 1 0:40- 1 2 Fall 

NBTS B-433 
Exegesis of Mark 

This course introduces the exegetical methods for 
Synoptic exegesis. Special attention is given to the 
development of exegetical skills for the Gospels by 
doing detailed exegesis of select passages in Mark's 
Gospel. Prerequisites: B-331 Synoptic Gospels and 
B- 3 16a/ 3 16b Greek I and Greek II or its 
equivalent. 
TBA WF 10:40-12 Fall 



20 



New Testament 



III. SELECT TOPICS IN 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B-332 

New Testament Theology 

A study of the various theologies of the New Testa- 
ment with special emphasis on Paul and John. The 
course is also designed to demonstrate the role of 
the books of the New Testament in the several 
theological traditions. 
Snyder WF 10:40-12 Fall 

CTU B-532 

Faith and Suffering: The Gospel 

Accounts of the Death of Jesus 

This seminar will examine the Passion narratives in 
the four gospels to appreciate how each gospel com- 
munity was able to reflect on the death of Jesus in 
the light of its traditions and faith experience. Par- 
ticipants in the seminar will use the skills of form 
and redaction criticism to analyze the gospel texts 
and to evaluate their potential for contemporary 
proclamation. 
Senior TTh 9-10:15 Fall 

CTS CH-524 

Seminar: New Testament Views of the Self 

A study of central notions of the person, both the 
person of sin and the transformed person under 
grace. The course will focus on the understandings 
of Jesus, the Gospel of John, and of Paul. Prere- 
quisite: CH 321 or equivalent. 
Scroggs MW 9:30-10:50 Fall 

MTS B-436 

Theological Interpretations of the 
New Testament and Other Early 
Christian Writings 

Examination of selected theological themes. 
Students will be encouraged to employ a variety of 
approaches to the texts, from such fields as 
literature, history, philosophy, women's studies, 
and the social sciences, to gain a fuller appreciation 
of the theological heritage of early Christianity for 
our religiously pluralistic world. 
Collins /Hilgcrt F 9-1 1:50 Fall 

NBTSB-431 

New Testament Theology 

Beginning with the development and rise of 
biblical theology as a discipline, this course focuses 
on Jesus' ministry as the basis of New Testament 
theology and Paul's thought as one expression of 
New Testament theology. Special emphasis is plac- 
ed on the nature and significance of Jesus' ministry 



underlying the Gospels as foundational for New 

Testament theology. Prerequisites: B-3 31 Synoptic 
Gospels and B-3 32 Pauline Epistles. 

TBA WF 8-9:20 Fall 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

BTS B-413 

Greek Exegesis: Ephesians 

A study of the book of Ephesians according to the 
Greek text. Prerequisite: Elements of New Testa- 
ment Greek or the equivalent. 
Horning MW 1-2:20 Fall 

LSTC B-307 

New Testament Greek 

A basic study of the Greek New Testament com- 
pleted within one quarter, and aiming at the utiliz- 
ing of the language in exegesis. 
Linss MW 11-12:15, Th8:30-9:45 Fall 

LSTC B-308 

New Testament Greek 1 

First part of a two-quarter Greek sequence, enabl- 
ing the student to gain a more thorough grasp of 
the grammar, to encounter practically all verb and 
noun forms used in the New Testament, and to 
gain a full understanding of Greek syntax. 
Krentz MTWF 8-8:50 Fall 

LSTC B-339 
Greek Readings 

Designed for those who have had an introductory 
Greek course, this course will continue the study of 
Greek grammar, based on the reading of selected 
parts of the Greek New Testament. 
Wegener MWF 8-8:50 Fall 

Wegener TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 

MTS B-324/325 

Introduction to New Testament Greek I, II 

Study of elementary Greek grammar, practice in 
translation, with introductory attention to ex- 
egesis. A non-divisible course of two quarters. 
Welborn Sept. 4-22 Summer Intensive 

Welhorn Sec. 1: MTWTh 9-9:50 Fall 

Welborn Sec. 2: MW 2-3:50 Fall 

NBTS/BTSB-316a 
New Testament Greek I 

This course, together with B-316b New Testament 
Greek II, is a basic introduction to the grammar 
and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. 



21 



New Testament 



Historical Studies 



Skills for translation are developed. This course is 

offered jointly by BTS and NETS. 

Holsey WF 1-2:20 Fall 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 
L INTRODUCTORY 

BTS H-346 

History of Christianity 1 

An overview of Christian history from the 
apostolic period to the Reformation. Topics in- 
clude the presuppositions of Christian history, the 
early church and Roman culture, the Constanti- 
nian church, the Augustinian synthesis, the con- 
version of Europe, monastic orders, and Eastern 
Orthodoxy. 
Wagner WF 10:40-12 Fall 



CTU H-302 

Early Expansion of Christianity 

A study is made of the Church as it encounters 
new cultures and changes from being a Jewish com- 
munity to a Graeco-Roman community. Institu- 
tional, devotional and doctrinal developments are 
all considered. The over-all question that the course 
attempts to answer is: are there any identifiable 
dynamics at work when the Church has been in- 
carnated in one culture and then seeks to incarnate 
herself in another? Project and examinations. 
Werner MW 10:30-11:45 Fall 



CTS CH-344 

History of Christian Thought 1 

From the early church to the late medieval period. 

A survey of significant theological movements, 

with attention to their social context. A selected 

theme will provide focus. Theme for 1984-5: 

Redemption. 

Thistlethwaite TTh 11-12:20 Fall 



LSTC H-330A 

Reformation and Modern Church History 

An introduction to Reformation and Modern 
Church History outside America, designed to show 
in broad perspective the movements which have 
shaped world Christianity in our time. Lectures 
and discussion of selected source readings. 
Hcndcl MWF 9-9:50 Fall 



LSTC H-330B 

Studies in Reformation and Modern 

Church History 

A course for students with some background in 
church history, using the thematic approach to 
study interaction between church and culture, in- 
cluding the influence and effect of cultural 
developments on Christian self-understanding. 
(An alternative to H-330A.) 
Fischer MW 11-12:15 Fall 



MTS H-3 19/320 

The Growth of the Christian Tradition: 

A History of Christian Doctrine 

The purpose of this course is to investigate what 
the Christian Church believed, taught, and con- 
fessed in its encounter with the world around it. 
The thesis of the course is that a critical understan- 
ding of the nature and growth of such a tradition is 
clearly necessary for reflecting upon the Christian 
life and thinking about the calling of the Church. 
Part One: From the Development of the Catholic 
Tradition to the Evolution of Medieval Theology. 
Part Two: From the Age of Renaissance and Refor- 
mation to the Age of Reason. 
Rigdon TTh 10-11:50 Fall, 319 

Rigdon MW 10-11:50 Winter, 320 



MTS H-329 

The Black Religious Heritage 

A study of the development of black religious in- 
stitutions by exploring 1) the historical process in 
which they emerged, 2) the theological, ethical and 
moral traditions associated with them, and 3) their 
role as institutions in the pastoral/therapeutic care 
of black people. ( = CTS TEC-390) 
Ashby et al. M 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fall 



NBTS C-342 

Reformation and Modern Christianity 

The course is an examination of major issues and 
developments in Christian life and thought from 
the time of the Reformation to the present. Regular 
and intensive reading, both in primary and secon- 
dary sources, is emphasized as the basis for mean- 
ingful classroom discussion. Prerequisites: 
Preferably C-341 Early and Medieval Christianity. 
Bakke TTh 11-12:20 Fall 



22 



Historical Studies 



NBTS C-442 

Protestant Evangelicalism 

An examination of characteristic evangelical em- 
phases through a study of their development in the 
thought of the Protestant Reformers, the Anabap- 
tists, Puritans in England and America, German 
Pietists, John Wesley, the Evangelicals in England 
and later American Evangelicals. 
Dayton T 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 



IL HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 
TRADITIONS 

LSTC H-360 

The Lutheran Heritage 

Content and scope of the Lutheran confessional 
writings and the manner in which they are nor- 
mative for Lutheran ministry and church life to- 
day. Recent interconfessional dialogues are taken 
into account. 

Scherer MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

Pero MW 1-2:15 Spring 

MTSH-310 

Hispanic Church Reformers 

This course will study the contribution to the 
Reformation by Spanish-speaking Reformers from 
the 16th century to the present. Intensive course, 
taught in Spanish. 
Nieto TBA Fall 

M/L H-394 

Unitarian Universalist History 

An introduction to Unitarian Universalist history, 
focused tov.'ard preparing ministers to help con- 
gregations become aware of the heritage of liberal 
religion. Brief introductions to Polish, Transylva- 
nian, and English Unitarianism and Universalism 
will precede the major emphasis of the course, 
which will be on American Unitarianism and 
Universalism. 
Godbey TBA Fall 

M/L H-433 

Modern European Religious Liberalism 

A comparison of the varied types of religious 
liberalism that emerged in European Protestant 
religious traditions. We shall study issues and crises 
within German Lutheranism; the Swiss, Dutch, 
and French Reformed churches; and both the 
Anglican and Dissenting movements in England. 
Particular attention will be given to the theological, 
philosophical, and ethical concerns that motivated 
leaders of movements which, in the twentieth cen- 



tury, became members of the World Council of 
Churches or of the International Association for 
Religious Freedom (I.A.R.F.). Readings in English 
will be accompanied by lectures drawn from 
sources and studies in other languages. 
Godbey TBA Fall 

NBTS C-443a 

Baptist History and Policy 

This course traces the history of Baptist churches 
from their British and Continental roots through 
their transplanting to the New World and growth 
and development to the present. It examines polity 
and practice of Baptist churches at congregational, 
associational, state, and national levels, especially 
in the ABC/USA. Meets requirements for ordina- 
tion. 
Mortensen 9/10-9/14, 5-6 hrs/day FallPre-Term 



III. HISTORY - INDIVIDUALS 

BTS H-456 

Luther, Calvin, Wesley 

The works of these three men will offer an oppor- 
tunity to compare major types of Protestant 
theology. At the same time, the unifying strands 
will constitute an intensive introduction to the 
main motifs of classical Protestantism. 
Brown Sept. 11-26 Fall Preterm 

CTU H-455 

John Henry Newman, Prophetic Figure of 

Modern Catholicism 

This course will attempt to give the student a better 
grasp of the present-day issues of Roman 
Catholicism by studying the writings of Cardinal 
Newman in historical perspective. Topics will in- 
clude the dynamics of conversion, development of 
doctrine, theological pluralism, authority, and the 
consensus fidelium, Catholicism and acculturation, 
the role of the laity, the relationship of faith to 
reason. 
Ross W 7-9:30 p.m. Fall 

LSTCH-512 
Augustine's Cit>' of God 

A seminar exploring Augustine's most comprehen- 
sive work, written in response to the con\'ulsi\'c 
crisis o( his times. Against the background of 
Augustine's world, we shall meet the thec^logian, 
philosopher, and church leader. (Prerec]: H-5I0 or 
equi\'.) 
Fischer MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 



23 



Historical Studies 



Theological Studies 



IV. AMERICAN CHURCH 
HISTORY 

BTS H-444 

Modern Religious Movements 

Description and analysis of the most active and ag- 
gressive cult groups in the United States, including 
the Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, Unification 
Church, and Scientology. 
Durnbaugh W 2:30-5:15 Fall 

CTU H-423 

A Socio-Cultural History of the Catholic 

Church in the Southwest: A Chicano 

Perspective 

Students will learn about the social, cultural, 
economic, and political factors underlying the 
spiritual conquest of the Chicanos in the 
Sc:)uthwest. Half of the course will consist in listen- 
ing to Chicano leaders (two women and seven 
men) speak about their personal experiences on 
certain issues relevant to the survival of Hispanos 
in the United States. 
Guerrero MW 10:30-11:45 Fall 

LSTC H-457 

The Quest for God: The Colonial 

Experience 

Thematic discussion of major episodes in American 
Church History during the Colonial Period with 
particular emphasis on the Puritan experience. In- 
vestigatic:)n of the genesis of characteristic concepts 
of American religion and politics such as the cc^ve- 
nant idea, chosen people, and manifest destiny. 
Hcndcl MW 1-2:15 Fall 

NETS C-544 

Case Studies in American Christianity 

This course is an examination of selected historical 
precedents to contemporary issues in American 
Christianity, such as: sources of religious authority, 
reason and feeling in religion, regeneration/sanc- 
tification in Christianity, rc/ies of Gc:)d and man in 
salvation, revivalism and social reform, the role of 
the church in society, and civil religion. 
Ohlmann TTh 8-9:20 Fall 



V. SELECT TOPICS 
IN CHURCH HISTORY 

BTSH-541 

Seminar in Modern Church History: 

Confessing Church 

The seminar will study the background, theological 
stance, and controversies within those Protestants 



in Nazi Germany who formed the Confessing 
Church. Participants will choose a movement or 
individual for sustained investigation, the results of 
which will be presented to the class. General 
understanding of modern European Christianity is 
a prerequisite. 
Durnbaugh T 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

CTS CH-460 

The Protestant Reformation 

A study of important persons, theologies, and 
events in the religious and social controversies of 
sixteenty-century Europe. Topics include the 
causes, character, and diversity of the Continental 
Reformation; the English Reformation in relation 
to the revolution of the following century; and the 
legacy of the Reformation for important continuing 
concerns of Christian life, including politics, the 
family, and worship. 
Bass MW 9:30-10:50 Fall 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY AND 
FOUNDATIONAL 

CTU T-303 

Introduction to Judaism and Jewish Thought 

For entering students, a survey history of Judaism 
and Jewish thought, designed to provide us a student 
with a panoramic overview and a background to 
highlight his/her religious and cultural stance, and 
to enable the student to take deeper advantage of 
elective courses that can be taken in the later years. 
Perelmuter MW 9-10:15 Fall 

CTU T-325 A, B 
Introduction to Theology 

A consideration of the nature, sources, and 
methods of theology worked out from a study of 
several case histories. Special emphasis on the 
historical revelation in Christianity and the 
developing awareness of the faith-community in 
relation to shifting horizons. 

Linnan Sec. AMW 9-10:15 Fall 

Graff Sec. BMW 10:30-1 1 :45 Fall 

Hayes MW 10:30-11:45 Winter 

CTS TEC-390 

The Black. Religious Heritage I 

A study of the development of black religious in- 
stitutions by exploring 1) the historical process in 
which they emerged, 2) the theological, ethical and 



24 



Theological Studies 



moral traditions associated with them, and 3) their 
role as institutions in the pastoral/therapeutic care 
of black people. (TEC 391 offered Winter Qt.) 
Cummings etal M 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fall 

CTS TEC-500 
Interpretation 

A seminar examining diverse modes of theological 

interpretation aiming at developing skills in 

relating theological perspectives to the concrete 

human situation. hlon-CTS, permission of instructor 

required. 

LeFevre W 2-5 p.m. Fall 

LSTCT'310 

Theology in Multicultural Perspective 

A consideration of the implications for Christian 
faith and practice of contemporary pluralism, and 
especially of the church's encounter with Black and 
Hispanic cultures. Serves also as an introduction to 
the nature of theology and of theological method. 
For entering LSTC students. 
Bloomquist /Navarro/ TTh 11-12:15 Fall 

Sherman /Pero 

LSTCT-310H 
Introduccion a la Teologia 
(Introduction to Theology) 

Este curso es una orientacion a la tarea teologica 
sus fuentes, los criterios que guian su estudio, los 
metodos que se emplean en el teologia. Se estudia 
la relacion entre la fe y teologia, el papel que juegan 
las autoridades en su estudio y la experiencia. Se 
trata la naturaleza del lenguaje teologico, y el con- 
texto actual de la teologia en el mundo cristiano. 
Navarro Th 7-10 p.m. Fall 

LSTCT-311 
Christian Theology I 

The first of a sequence of three courses that pro- 
vides a survey of the basic doctrines of the Chris- 
tian faith, taking into account their biblical origins, 
their developments in the Christian tradition, and 
their contemporary significance. Emphasis will be 
placed on helping students to develop their own 
theological perspectives. In this first course, the 
topics covered, in addition to Prolegomena, in- 
clude the doctrines relating to the First Article of 
the creed: Creation, Revelation, the Nature of 
God, the Trinity. 

Hefner TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

Hefner TTh 11-12:15 Fall 



NETS C-353 

Christian Theology I: Issues and Approaches 

This course is an introduction to the way in which 
Christians have attempted to support, clarify and 
communicate their faith in various past and pre- 
sent situations. It also is an introduction to the 
leading theologians and fundamental issues in 
Reformation, Enlightenment, Liberal, neo- 
Orthodox and more recent periods. Prerequisites: 
C-350 Philosophy of Religion, or some previous ac- 
quaintance with philosophy, is advised. 
TBA M 2:30-5:10 Fall 



IL THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 

INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

BTS T-452 

Theology of Karl Barth 

An inductive study of representative writings. Prin- 
cipal reading will be in the Church Dogmatics. 
Groff/Frantz TTh 8-9:20 Fall 

BTS T-457 

Brethren In Theological Perspective 

Theological presuppositions of Brethren 
historiography and development will be examined, 
and present theological trends will be traced. The 
doctrines and practices of the Brethren will be 
discussed in dialogue with contemporary thought. 
Current issues will be delineated. 
Brown TTh 11-12:20 Fall 

CTS TEC-490 

The Theologies of Friedrich Schleiermacher 

and Karl Barth: A Contrast 

An investigation of the thought of these two 
theologians in relation to each other. The contem- 
porary discussion about "theologies of experience" 
and "theologies of revelation" will be located within 
the framework of the thought of Schleiermacher 
and Barth. Focus will be on Barth's early writings 
and Schleiermacher's The Christian Faith. 
Cummings T 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fall 

CTS TEC-532a 
Whitehead 

An examination of Whitehead's philosophical 
theology and a consideration of its implications for 
social ethics and for research in the social sciences. 
The primary reading will be Process and Reality. 
Students electing this course and not CTS TEC- 
532b may elect either a term paper or a final ex- 
amination to fulfill requirements for this course. 
Students electing CTS TEC-532b receive credit for 



25 



Theological Studies 

both CTS TEC'532a and CTS TEC-532b upon 

completion of CTS TEC-532b. 

Schroeder T 2-5 p.m. Fall 

LSTC T-434 

Theology of Martin Luther King, Jr. 

The course consists of an in-depth analysis of the 
theology and praxis of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., 
wrestling with the philosophical and theological 
principles he employed and their relevance in to- 
day's theological marketplace. 
Pew TF 1^2:15 Fall 

NETS C-448 

Issues in Pentecostal and Charismatic 

Theology and Piety 

This introductory overview of the Pentecostal and 
charismatic traditions will examine some of the 
biblical and theological issues raised and survey 
various interpretations (historical, psychological, 
and sociological) of the movements. 
Dayton W 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 



IIL SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 

CTU T-430 

The Problem of God in Contemporary Society 

An analysis of why God has became problematic 
for contemporary people is followed by a critical 
review of representative Christian attempts to re- 
spond to this problem. The course seeks to help the 
student evaluate his or her own religious ex- 
perience and respond intelligently to the modern 
problem of God. 

Szura MW 12' 1:1 5 Fall 

Burrows TTh 9- 10:15 Wmter 

CTU T-448 

Liberation Theology in Latin America 

Since Puebla 

Taking the CELAM III document as point of 
departure we will try to follow subsequent 
developments in Latin American liberation 
theology. Special emphasis will be laid on Puebla's 
endorsement of Medellin's 'preferential, yet not ex- 
clusive, option for the poor,' and on the centrality 
of the poor in most liberation theology and exegesis 
since then - a preoccupation that amounts to a 
veritable ptochology. 
Reynolds W 3-5:30 p.m. Fall 



CTS TEC-495 
Women in Crisis 

Crises in women's lives with particular attention to 
issues of violence. Combined historical and 
cultural background, socio-economic analysis, 
practical experience and models of decision mak- 
ing. 



Thisdethwake /Ruether 



T2-5 



Fall 



LSTC T-446 

Formative Theologies in Children's Literature 

A sampling of current children's literature focusing 
on theological issues and how these are dealt with. 
The course will explore such concerns as: 1) family 
structures: nurture and brokenness, 2) pain and 
evil, 3) humor and joy, 4) moral structures, 5) 
loneliness and death, 6) forgiveness and grace. Per- 
tinent for those concerned with educational 
ministry and/or preaching to children. 
Kddegaard TF 1-2:15 Fall 

LSTC T-450 

Senior Seminar I: 

Theology and the Church's Ministry 

An integrative course dealing with the role of 
theology in pastoral formation and functioning, 
and based on experiences and problems en- 
countered in internship. For seniors at LSTC. 
Bertram TTh 11-12:15 Fall 

LSTC T-457 

Lutheran Ecumenical Relations 

An examination of the documentation produced 
and the issues under consideration in the bilateral 
dialogues between the Lutheran churches and the i 
Roman Catholic, Orthodox, Anglican, and 
Reformed churches, at both the national and inter- 
national levels. 
Tobias TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

LSTCT-601 

Graduate Theological Seminar 

Graduate students in the theological field will 
make presentations based on their specialized in- 
terests and scholarly research. Special attention to 
the question of how the student's theology 
responds to the present cultural setting. (For post- 
M.Div. students. Admission by others by consent 
of instructor.) 
Hefner M 7-10 p.m. Fall 



26 



Theological Studies 



LSTCT-611 

The Public Uses of Theology 

A graduate course on the public accountability of 

theology's users. What, according to recent 

philosophers, is a "public"? Who are Christian 

theology's normative publics, and by what norms 

of theirs is it to be judged? Who in the church is 

responsible for making theology public? Special 

issues: Kingdom, vocadon, secularity, christology, 

verification. 

Bertram W 7- 10 p.m. Fall 

MTS T-402 

Baptism and Eucharist 

A study of the Christian doctrines of baptism and 
eucharist, with emphasis on critical analysis of 
various issues now in controversy. Attention will 
be given to the liturgical implications of various 
theological outlooks. 
Burkhart MW 2-3:50 Fall 

MTS T-415 

The Ecumenical Vision 

This course seeks to acquaint the student with the 
vision of the Christian Church as a single, yet 
diversified and interdependent, global reality 
which exists in the world as a sign of the future uni- 
ty and fulfillment of humankind. Attention will be 
given to ecumenical opportunities now before the 
Presbyterian and other protestant churches. 
Mudge Tl-4 Fall 



IV. SPIRITUALITY AND 

SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTU T-300 

Structures of Religious Experience: 

The Primitive Traditions 

A study of the structures of myth, sacred time and 
space, ritual and magic, rites of passage, and 
shamanism as means of experiencing the sacred in 
self and society. Emphasis will be placed on the 
concrete manifestation of these structures in a 
number of so-called primitive societies. 
Schreker MW 9- 1 0:1 5 Fall 

CTU M.301 

Psychological Dimensions of Religous 

Experience 

This course will examine religious experience 
through an analysis of some phenomenological, 
psychological, and sociological understandings of 
the nature of religious experience followed by the 



development of specific psychological themes 

which appear in this material. 

McCarthy T 1:304 Fall 

CTU M-410 
Spiritual Direction 

This course will aim at reaching a consensus on the 
basic criteria and principles to be followed in 
spiritual direction. After a rapid historical over- 
view, the course will focus on certain topics: the 
leading Spirit and human leadership, director's 
qualities, direct versus personal responsibility, 
knowing the personality, discerning the spirits, in- 
terpreting the events of life, difference between 
spiritual direction and counseling. 
Lozano TTh 12-1:15 Fall 

CTU M.417 

Theology of Religious Life 

Starting from the common calling to Discipleship, 
a key concept in the Gospels, this course will ex- 
amine the variety of Christian vocations in their 
specific relationship to the Church, to the world, 
the charisms proper to religious life: celibacy, 
solitude-community, the history and meaning of 
the commitments (Can vows be evangelical? Are 
perpetual commitments possible?). 
Lozano TTh9-10:15 Fall 

CTU M-483, 484, 485 

Advanced Ministry Practicum: Spirituality 

The student engages in supervised ministry in a 
year-long placement focusing on spirituality. The 
consultant at CTU helps the student write a case 
history. A concomitant course in the area of 
spirituality is required. Prerequisite is Basic 
Ministry Practicum, or approval of the CMM 
Department of CTU. 

McCarthy TBA Fall 483 /Winter 

484 /Spring 485 

LSTC M-483 

The Way: East and West 

An exploration through readings, discussion, and 

practice in meditation of the themes and motifs of 

religious awareness and sensibility linking East and 

West, especially in Zen and the Christian mystical 

tradition. 

Rochelle MWF 8-8:50 Fall 

MTS T-427 

The Life of Prayer 

A survey of theological considerations bearing on 
the life of prayer. Aims toward developing a per- 



27 



Theological Studies 



Ethics Studies 



sonal theology of prayer and the discipline of pray- 
ing. Includes Christian mysticism. 
Parker W 7-9:50 p.m. Fall 



ETHICAL STUDIES 
L MORAL THEOLOGY 

CTU E-379 

Christian Ethics: The Moral Agent 

An introductory study of the place of an agent- 
centered morality and of the notion of virtue 
within Christian ethics. Major areas of concentra- 
tion include Thomas Aquinas and the contem- 
porary virtue approach of Hauerwas. This ap- 
proach will then be contrasted with other contem- 
porary methods in order to ascertain its 
significance for moral decision making. 
Nairn MW 12-1:15 Fall 

Nairn MW 1:30-2:45 Winter 



last hundred years, of a new presence and relevan- 
cy of the Church in public life and on how this 
development is related to a new understanding of 
the Church's mission and of its claim to be "the 
universal sacrament of salvation." Attention will be 
given to foundational texts in the Roman Catholic 
tradition and the main texts of other Christian 
traditions with the aim of discovering the ability of 
the Christian community to influence social ethics 
and public policy. 

Fornasan MW 1:30-2:45 Fall 

Fornasari MW 9-10:15 Spring 

CTU E-480 
Love and Justice 

An examination of two fundamental notions in 
Christian ethics. The purpose of the course is to 
analyze, compare, and assess critically the claims of 
both, as well as their interaction, in contemporary 
theology and ethics. 
Nairn M 3-5:30 p.m. Fall 



CTSTEC-321 
Christian Ethics 

Historical and contemporary Christian ethical 
systems with a consideration of their implications 
and current significance. 
Schrocdcr MW 2-3:20 Fall 

LSTCE-310 
Christian Ethics 

A study of the sources, structure, and dynamics of 
Christian ethics, with reference to current pro- 
blems of personal and public life. (Not open to first- 
year students.) 

Bloomquist MW 1-2:15 Fall 

Sherman TF 1-2:1 5 Spring 



II. SOCIAL AND 
POLITICAL ETHICS 

BTS E'369 

Peace Studies Seminar 

The seminar runs continually throughout the year. 
It offers opportunity for common reading of peace- 
related materials; presentation and discussion of 
papers; sharing from peace ministries; and dialogue 
with visiting peace theologians, activists, and 
leaders. One quarter hour credit per quarter. 
Brown T 3:10-4:40 Fall 

CTU E-374 

On Being A Christian in the World 

The course will focus on the development, in the 



CTUE-551 

Spirituality, Liturgy and the Quest for Justice 

An examination of various issues in the 
Spirituality/Justice nexus. Among those to be con- 
sidered are the centrality of justice for an authentic 
spirituality, biblical links between spirituality and 
justice, the role of justice in some traditional forms 
of spirituality such as the Ignatian Exercises, and 
the proper contribution of liturgical celebration in 
the creation of a justice consciousness. Some con- 
temporary authors such as Thomas Merton will be 
included in the discussion. 
Pawlikowksi T 1:30-4 Fall 

CTU E-556 

Becoming a Friend of God: The Virtue 

Tradition in Aquinas 

Aquinas described the normal life as the way one 
makes his/her way back to God. This transforma- 
tion of the person unto God was the work of the 
virtues, particularly charity. This course will ex- 
amine Aquinas' treatise on the moral life in the 
Summa from the perspective of our charity- 
friendship with God. 
Wadell MW 3-4:15 Fall 

CTU E-584 

Moral Issues in Economics and Business 

The relationship between Christianity and the 
origins of modern capitalism; a Christian critique 
of capitalism; the Corporate Responsibility move- 



28 



Ethics Studies 



ment; international economic issues; ethics in 

business. 

Pawlikowski TTh 1 0:30- 11:45 Fall 

CTU M-492, 493, 494 
Advanced Ministry Practicum: 
Social Justice 

The student engages in supervised ministry in a 
year-long placement focusing on social justice. The 
consultant_at CTU helps the student write a case 
history. A concomitant course in the area of social 
justice is required. Prerequisite in Basic Ministry 
Practicum, or approval of the CMM Department at 
CTU. 

Szura TBA Fall 492 /Winter 493/ 

Spring 494 

CTSTEC-451 

Introduction to Public Ministries 

Socio-economic and political introduction to ur- 
ban problems focusing on the churches' ministries 
to urban issues, people and institutions. The course 
is intended as an introduction to cities in general 
and the Chicago metropolitan area in particular. It 
is also preparation for students planning to enroll 
in the Summer Urban Education intensive. 
Fukuyama T 2-5 Fall 

MTS E-416 

Peace as a Christian Moral Concern 

This course examines some of the various ways 
Christians have defined peace and the implications 
this has had for acting toward its realization. Possi- 
ble issues to examine are the arms race, political in- 
volvement in social change and food distribution. 
Garcia F 9-11:50 Fall 

M/L E-392 
Environmental Ethics 

An introduction to the leading positions and con- 
temporary literature in environmental ethics, with 
special attention to the problem of the relation be- 
tween concepts of social and environmental justice. 
Engel TBA Fall 

NETS C-458aH 

Social Ethics 1: An Historical Third 

World Perspective 

This course, which is taught in Spanish, is an in- 
quiry — from the perspective of the poor — of ma- 
jor socio-ethical thinkers and movements in the 
Christian tradition from the New Testament to the 
Enlightenment, giving special attention to those of 
contestative intentionality as expressions of the 



subversive character of Christian faith. Prere- 
quisites: C-351H Introduction to Theology: An 
Approach from the Underside of History or its 
equivalent by consent of the instructor. 
Mottesi T 6-8:40 p.m. Fall 



IIL SELECT TOPICS IN ETHICS 

CTU E-402 

Traditions of Natural Law Theories 

The course is designed to study the relevance of 
"natural law" for Christian anthropology that claim 
universal significance and value. The question will 
be approached historically and with the help of in- 
terdisciplinary information. The main thrust of the 
course will be that of illuminating the emerging 
agenda of the Church as an ethical community: 
how to find and secure a normative humanity in a 
world that is factually interdependent but ethically 
and anthropologically pluralistic and in conflict. 
Foundational courses in ethics are prerequisite. 
Fornasari M 7-9:30 p.m. Fall 

CTU E-470 

The Formation of Conscience 

A study on the various levels of conscience, their 
development and interrelation, and their influence 
on ethical decision-making. We will discuss some 
basic theories of moral development, e.g., the 
theories of Erikson and Kohlberg, and consider 
their ethical implications. We will look at how the 
development of conscience is connected to the 
discovery of self. In light of our research, each stu- 
dent will be expected to examine his/her own 
development of conscience and decision-making 
process. 
Diesbourg W 1:30-2:45 Fall 

CTU E-581 

Marriage as a Sacrament: 

A Study in Fidelity 

A fruitful way for appreciating the richness and 
promise of marriage as a sacrament is to consider it 
in light of the virtue of fidelity. This course will 
focus on the significance of fidelity as a way of 
rightly shaping our understanding of marriage and 
family life. Similarly, this same perspective of fideli- 
ty will guide a study of such corollary issues such as 
children, indissolubility, divorce and remarriage. 
Wadell MW 9-10:15 Fall 



29 



World Mission Studies 



Ministry Studies 



WORLD MISSION STUDIES 

CTU W-497 

Mission Integration Seminar 

This seminar is limited to students returning from a 
cross-cultural program. Building on their recent ex- 
perience and present reenculturation process, this 
seminar will help the participants to recognize the 
particular dynamics of the reenculturation process 
and through group support and critique to use 
these dynamics in integrating and further develop- 
ing their Christian commitment, ministerial identi- 
ty, and missionary formation. 
Staff M 7-9:30 p.m. Fall 

Staff TBA Winter 

CTU 1-460 

Cross-Cultural Communication: Intensive 

A quarter-long intensive, providing both 
theoretical and practical dimensions, designed to 
help students prepare for ministry c^utside their 
home culture, or to explore the cultural assump- 
tions of their own theology and thinking. Emphasis 
is on the praxis of inter-faith and ecumenical 
dialogue and on learning how to listen and com- 
municate in the cultural contexts. 
Barbour /Doidgc/ Guerrero 
3 credits - Theory + one weekend Field 
6 credits = Theory + two weeks Field 
9 credits = Theor\ + three xeeeks Field 
Theory: MW 1:30-2:45 10/1-10/31 

Field: 11/5-11/26 



Theory: MW 1:30-2:45 

Enrollment limited to 20. 



11/28-12/14 
Fall 



LSTC W.310 

World Mission and Evangelization: 

History, Theology, and Practice 

An introduction to the background and contem- 
porary practice of mission and evangelization seen as 
the ecumenical task of the church on all six con- 
tinents. Parish programs of mission education and 
motivation are also considered. 
Scherer TF 1-2:15 Fall 

LSTC W.431 

Japanese Religions in Context 

The response of an original folk religion to suc- 
cessive incursions of Buddhism, Confucianism, and 
Christianity is traced through the ages. The so- 
called "New Religions" and their traditional roots 
make Japan an exciting laboratory for religious 
study. 
W. Danker MW 1-2:15 Fall 



MTS W-436 

Younger Churches in Africa and Asia 

A study of younger churches in Africa and Asia, 
their development from mission dependency to 
autonomy; their role in and response to their respec- 
tive societies as well as to critical religious, political, 
economic, social and international issues. The 
course will also consider the theological basis of the 
mission of the church, seen in the contemporary set- 
ting. 

Gelzer MW 10-11:50 Fall 

Center Fall 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

I. THE NATURE AND PRACTICE 

OF MINISTRY 

CTU M-380, 385, 390 
Basic Ministry Practicum 

A year-long group theological reflection upon 
supervised ministry to individuals at an approved 
site. Workshops in communication skills and cross- 
cultural awareness are required. This required core 
experience is recommended for first year M.Div. 
students. (Approval of one's religious community 
or CMM Department required.) 
Staff TBA Fall 380/ 

Winter 385 /Spring 390 

CTS CM-300 

The Practice of Christian Ministry 

A course to assist the student in experiencing and 
initiating a style of pastoral and theological reflec- 
tion; to provide the student with the perspective on 
the nature, history and practice of ministry in 
Christian vocation. Open to students other than 
CTS with permission of the instructor. 
Moore/ MW 11-12:20 Fall 

Thistlethwaite/Edgerton 

CTSTEC-451 

Introduction to Public Ministries 

Socio-economic and political introduction to ur- 
ban problems focusing on the churches' ministries 
to urban issues, people and institutions. The course 
is intended as an introduction to cities in general 
and the Chicago metropolitan area in particular. It 
is also preparation for students planning to enroll 
in the Summer Urban Education intensive. 
Fukuyama T 2-5 Fall 



30 



Pastoral Studies 



Ministry Studies 



MTS M.307 

Preparing for Ministry: Polity and Worship 

in the Presbyterian Church U.S.A. 

Students are prepared for thinking and acting effec- 
tively in the various church structures they enter. 
Special attention is given to the relation between 
polity, politics and church life. Presbyterian 
students will receive specific assistance in relation 
to Standard Ordination Examinations in polity 
and worship. Attention is also given to the process 
of seeking a call to a position in the church. Course 
begins with Intensive, Sept. 24-28, 1984. Recom- 
mended for Seniors. 

Worley Intensive TBA Fall 

M 6:30-9:30 p.m. 

MTS M-312 

Mission Imperatives: Evangelism, Stewardship, 

Social Services, Systemic Change 

and World Community 

This course introduces the mission imperatives of 
the church in the world: sharing the Good News - 
evangelism; developing resources — stewardship; 
responding to human need — social service; 
organizing for justice — systemic change; and seek- 
ing peace (shalom) - world community. In each 
area the course suggests biblical-theological foun- 
dations, participant motivations, leadership per- 
sonalities, available resources, case studies and 
model situations. 
Dudley TTh 10-11:50 Fall 

NBTS 1-300 

Nature and Mission of the Church 

This course examines the nature and mission of the 
Church from the perspective of each of the 
disciplines within the seminary curriculum. This 
interdisciplinary approach seeks to help students 
focus their career goals in ministry and to provide a 
holistic understanding of the Church. 
f^ehon/ Faculty WF 8-9:20 Fall 

NBTS M-362 

The Urban Ministry of the Church 

Designed as a traveling seminar in urban mission, 
this course will meet in a different Chicago com- 
munity each week to confront a wide range of con- 
textual dynamics :!nd an equal range of church 
ministry responses. Students should expect to stay 
in the city one Sunday night and negotiate some 
schedule options to take advantage of urban 
events. Readings, reflective journal and group par- 
ticipation will be the basis of student evaluation. 
Bakkc \i 9:30-12:10 Fall 



11. PASTORAL CARE 

BTS M-486 

Ministry with the Aging 

This course involves the study of the aging process 
with the aid of the social sciences and works to 
develop 1) their knowledge of Pastoral Counseling 
volved with aging persons in a variety of ways and 
will begin to develop programs and counseling 
skills that are appropriate to this population. 
Poling TT/i 9:30-10:50 Fall 

BTS M-584 
Case Conference 

This course involves weekly one-hour sessions of 
three to five students who are involved in regular 
counseling in a local church or a clinical setting. 
Three hours credit for the academic year. 
Poling TBA Fall 

CTU M-405 

Introduction to Basic Pastoral Counseling 

This course will aid the student to assess and 
develop 1) their knowledge of Pastoral Counseling 
principles and dynamics; 2) their skills in the face- 
to-face dialogue; 3) their ability to critique and 
learn from their counseling ministry. The focus of 
the class is in the initial interview. Considerable 
time is spent outside the class developing counsel- 
ing skills by taping practice sessions with peers and 
in review sessions with the instructors. Limited 
enrollment (15). Audio-visual fee. 
Mallonee MW 9-10:15 Fall 

Uallonee TTh 9-10:15 Winter 

McCarthy TTh 10:30-1 1:45 Spring 

CTU M-489, 490, 491 
Advanced Ministry Practicum: 
Community Development 

The student engages in supervised ministry in a 
year-long placement focusing on community 
development. The consultant helps the student 
write a case history. A concomitant course in the 
area of community development is required. Prere- 
quisite is Basic Ministry Practicum, or appro\'al of 
the CMM Department at CTU. 
Szura TBA Fall 489, Winter 490/ 

Spring 491 

CTUM-510 

Psychology for Theology and Ministry 

This full-year three credit course meets about once 
a month. It provides oppc^rtunity to read and ex- 
plore for pastoral, theological and psychological 




31 



Pastoral Studies 



Liturgy and Worship 



value the classical primary sources (great books) in 

psychology. 

Szura TBA Fall /Winter /Spring 



CTSCM-451 

Gestalt Therapy and Religious Experience 

An exploration and experiencing of Gestalt 
Therapy is one way of understanding contem- 
porary religious experience. (Limited enrollment of 
25 - CTS priority.) 
Anderson M 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fall 



CTS CM-500 

Topics in Psychotherapy: Object Relations 

Theory and Clinical Practice 

An advanced course in psychotherapeutic theory 

and technique. Enrollment limited to 15. 

Moore M 2-5 Fall 



LSTCM-521 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

A course aimed at the preparation of the pastor for 
his or her predominant type of counseling, con- 
sidering theories and practices in present-day con- 
joint and family therapies, pre-marital education, 
divorce, sexuality, and the sociology of marriage. 
Limited to M.Div. seniors and D.Min. students. 
Swanson F 8-12:15 Fall 



NETS M-397 

Personality Types and Christian Meditation 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the in- 
dividual with the phenomenon of meditation and 
contemplation through the perspective of per- 
sonality typology. The course will major on the 
more experiential dimensions and minor on the 
cognitive elements. Each session will include both 
experiential and didactic exercises. 
Edwards, H&B T 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 



NETS M-495 
Theories of Counseling 

Class members will study, critique and experiment 
with the following four theories of counseling: 
client-centered, problem-solving, psychodynamic, 
and behavior modification. Classes will also in- 
clude: counseling exercises, case examples and 
discussions of the theological implications of the 
theories and their application for pastoral care. 
Tyson M 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 



NETS M-597 
Group Counseling 

The purpose of this course is to give students a 
basic understanding of group therapy, the group 
process and group dynamics. The class will learn 
basic skills which will enhance their ability to work 
within the context of a group setting. 
Ideran Th 1-3:40 Fall 



LSTC M-533 

Spirituality in Pastoral Care 

Following an examination of various dimensions of 
spirituality, the spiritual context of pastoral care 
will be explored and students will be guided in pro- 
posing theological interventions in pastoral care 
situations according to a system produced by the 
instructor. (Prerq: LSTC M-320 or equiv.) 
Bauermeister TF 1-2:15 Fall 



LSTC M-622 A and D 

Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling 

Supervised clinical work in marriage and family 
therapy in the Marriage and Family Therapy 
Center in Palos Park. Therapy with individuals, 
couples, families, together with theoretical input 
and staff evaluation sessions and case review. 
Limited to D.Min. in P.C.C. students. 
Sicanson TBA Fall 



HI. LITURGY & WORSHIP 
STUDIES 

ETS M-475 

The Facilitation of Worship 

A study of worship and music as expressed in the 
Free Church tradition. The theology and structure 
of worship will be analyzed, but each person will be 
encouraged to become aware of his or her own ex- 
pressive gifts and to use them authentically in plan- 
ning and leading corporate worship. 
Faus/Fike W2:40-5:15 Fall 



CTU T-355 

Sacraments: Theology and Celebration 

This course will explore the human-religious ex- 
perience of the faith community and its expression 



32 



Preaching and Communication 



Liturgy and Worship 



in sacramental celebration with particular atten- 
tion to Initiation, Reconciliation, and Eucharist. A 
basic course in the sacraments designed for those 
who will not take separate courses in these 
sacraments. 
Hughes M 3-5:30 Fall 

CTU T-455 
Initiation 

Historical, theological and pastoral reflections on 
the experience and sacraments of Christian Initia- 
tion, with particular focus on the Rite of Christian 
Initiation of Adults as the norm for initiatory prac- 
tice. 

Kcifcr TTh 12-1:15 Fall 

Hughes M W 1 0:30- 11:45 Winter 

CTU T-450 

Theology of the Eucharist 

A study of the origins and historical development 
of the eucharistic liturgy, with particular emphasis 
on the eucharistic prayer. Reflection on questions 
of eucharistic theology and ecumenical practice. 
Ostdiek MW 10:30-11:45 Fall 

Keifer TTh 10:30-11:45 Winter 

CTU T-553 
Readings in Ritual 

Comparative readings and seminar discussion on 
ritual, its nature and function. Fields to be drawn 
on include the history of religions, cultural an- 
thropology, psychology and social psychology. 
Ostdiek T 7-9:30 p.m. Fall 

CTU M-486, 487, 488 

Advanced Ministry Practicum: Worship 

The student engages in supervised ministry in a 
year-long placement focusing on worship. The con- 
sultant at CTU helps the student write a case 
history. A concomitant course in the area of wor- 
ship is required. Prerequisite is Basic Ministry Prac- 
ticum, or approval of the CMM Department at 
CTU. 

Keifer TBA Fall 486/Winter 

487/Spring 488 

CTS CM-317 

The Music Program of the Church 

A minister's guide to the understanding and 
enrichment of the church music program: hym- 
nology, choral music, selection, purchase and 
maintenance of the organ, organ music, relations 
with music staff. Music for weddings and funerals, 
liturgy, etc. 
Winfield M2-5 Fall 



LSTC M-489 

J.S. Bach as BibUcal Interpreter 

Focus on how the composer unfolds his interpreta- 
tion of texts through musical materials. Preparation 
for the study of each cantata through a sketch of 
events in Bach's life, an introduction to his works 
and the problems of dating, and a survey of 
resources for research. 
Bangert M 7-iOp.m. Fall 

LSTC M-586 

Ministry through the Occasional Services 

After examining the psychosocial and the liturgical 
contexts of the occasional services, the ministry 
modalities of worship, pastoral care, music, and 
preaching will be explored. Particular attention will 
be concentrated on weddings, funerals, and 
ministry to the sick and dying. (Prereq: LSTC 
M-380 or equiv.) 
Bangert /Bauermeister MW 11-12:15 Fall 



IV. PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

BTSM-371 

Ministry and Communication 

In this course, students are exposed to a variety of 
communications tasks. Being a lab course, we will 
regularly practice entering an event or text and em- 
bodying its drama. Students will both present and 
respond to presentations so as to define and 
enhance communication skills. 
Meyer /Wilson Sec. 1: M 6:45-9:30 p.m. Fall 

Sec. 2: T 9:30-12:15 

BTSM-471 
Tutorial in Preaching 

This course concentrates on choosing materials for 

and preparing sermons, increasing the power and 

lucidity of written sermons, adapting the written to 

the oral word, and improving the style of delivery. 

Students' sermons are critiqued by faculty and 

peers. 

Fike/Dill TBA Fall 

CTU M-449 

Communication Skills for Public Ministry 

In small group interaction and discussion, students 
examine the nature and dynamics of communica- 
tion processes of 1) interpersonal communication, 
2) public address, 3) oral interpretation and perfor- 
mance of literature. Emphasis is on developing 



33 



Preaching and Communication 



Educational Ministry 



communication skills required in ministerial situa- 
tions. Audio-visual fee. 

TBA TBA Fall 

Baumer W 3-5 -JO Winter 

CTU M-450 

The Homily in the Sunday Assembly 

Students explore through lecture and practicum 
the principles and practices of liturgical preaching. 
The constitutive elements of the course include the 
presentation and development of communication 
theory and skills, apreciation of the hermeneutical 
task and the use of the creative imagination; 
understanding how the ritual context shapes and 
informs the homily; and the appropriation and 
sharing of a personal spirituality of preaching. 
Limited enrollment. CTU M-449 or equivalent 
recommended. Audio-visual fee. 
Hughes AB Seminar M 9- 10: 15 Fall 

A Lab W 8:15-10:15 

B Lab W 3-5 
Baumer AB Seminar W 9- 1 0: 1 5 Winter 

A Lab F 8:15-10:15 

B Lab F 10:30-12:30 
Baumer AB Seminar W 9- 1 0: 1 5 Spring 

A Lab F 8:15-10:15 

B Lab F 10:30-12:30 

CTUM-451 

Preaching in the Non-Liturgical Setting 

Retreats, spiritual conferences, evangelical situa- 
tions: church gatherings of many kinds are con- 
texts for preaching. Students explore the specific 
demands and possibilities these situations present 
for the preacher. CTU M-449 or equivalent recom- 
mended. Audio-visual fee. 
TBA TBA TBA 

LSTC M-542 
Preaching the Pericopes 

Careful investigation of methods of biblical inter- 
pretation basic for preaching texts from the three- 
year lectionary. Attention given to the particular 
series which begins in Advent following the term in 
which the course is offered. Students will engage in 
advance sermon preparation and produce a 
preaching portfolio. (Prereq: LSTC M-340 or 
equiv.) 
Deppe MWF 9-9:50 Fall 

MTS M-315 

Introducing the Dynamics of Preaching 

This course helps the student bring together in acts 
of preaching the life of God's people in Scripture 



with the life of God's people today through the 
preacher's particular gifts of understanding and ex- 
pression. We work on integrating the disciplines of 
biblical exegesis, hermeneutics, the theology of 
preaching, the preacher's understanding of self and 
world, and oral interpretation. We prepare two ser- 
mons from exegesis to manuscript and deliver those 
sermons in lab settings. 
Wardlaw /Wilson MW 10-11:50 Fall 

NBTS M-390 

Communicating in Pastoral Contexts 

This course is designed for junior students as a 
theological introduction to the study of pastoral 
ministry from the perspective of intercultural com- 
munication theory. It emphasizes public speaking 
as a tool for the communication of God's Word to 
God's People. 
Wilson M 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 



V. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

BTS M-492 

The Faith Community As Teacher 

An examination of the Christian Education pro- 
gram of the local congregation from the point of 
view of the "community model." The basic contem- 
porary writings in the field will be assessed from the 
vantage point of the community model. 
Miller WF 8-9:20 Fall 

CTU M-463 

Holistic Parish Education 

This course helps the minister design, plan and 
work with staff and volunteers in a total parish 
education program. Class sessions include adult 
catechesis, evangelization, sacramental prepara- 
tion, principles of cultural adaptation and educa- 
tion of the parish in prayer and social justice. 
Lucinio Th 10:30-1 Fall 

Lucinio Th 10:30-1 Winter 

CTU M-480, 481, 482 
Advanced Ministry Practicum: 
Religious Education 

The student engages in supervised ministry in a 
year-long placement focusing on religious educa- 
tion. The consultant at CTU helps the student 
write a case history. A concomitant course in the 
area of religious education is required. Prerequisite 
is Basic Ministry Practicum, or approval of the 
CMM Department at CTU. 
Lucinio TBA Fall 480 /Winter 481/ 

Spring 482 



34 



Canon Law 



Educational Ministry 



CTS CM-320 

An Overview of Christian Education 

This is your basic "C.E. 101" course. Theory and 
pragmatic issues will be explored from a Life-span 
approach. Students will emerge with an integrated 
sense of what Christian Education is all about in 
the local church. 
Myers T 9:30-12:20 Fall 

LSTC M-360A 

Educational Ministry: Christian Nurture 

Treatment of theological and psychological 
material related to Christian education, leading to 
the formation of principles which guide the prac- 
tice of educational ministry. Exercises both in the 
classroom and in the Teaching Parish setting. 
Conrad TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

LSTC M-360B 

Educational Ministry: The Pastor as Teacher 

A seminar to explore the role of the pastor as 

teacher/theologian in residence in the parish, and 

the ways that education supports all functions of 

the congregation. An advanced alternative for 

M-360A. 

Bozeman TTh H- 12: 15 Fall 

NETS M-380 

Seminar in Human Development 

This is a basic course which focuses on the 
characteristics and inter-relationships o{ 
developmental stages, including stages of moral 
and faith development. It also compares and cri- 
tiques some of the major theories and explores ap- 
plications to Christian education. 
Morns M 9:30-12:10 Fall 

NETS M.381 

Teaching Ministry of the Church 

This course is a basic course which introduces the 
teaching ministry of the church utilizing five con- 



temporary approaches to Christian religious educa- 
tion. Students learn a basic instructional model 
and lead a peer group in a learning experience. 
Curricular resources of American Baptist 
Churches/USA and Christian Education: Shared 
Approaches are critiqued in learning centers. 
Jenkins /Pokrant TTh 8-9:20 Fall 

NETS M-384 

Personal Growth Through Group Encounter 

In this course participants share in a laboratory 
group with a commitment to risk new personal and 
inter-personal behaviors. Human relations skills 
are developed by leadership of small groups. 
Historic and current utilization of the small group 
format by the Church for personal spiritual growth 
is examined. 
Jenkins September 17-21, 5-6 hrs/day Fall Pre-Term 

NETS M-487 

Educational Ministry with Adults 

In this course a study of the developmental needs 
and growth patterns of male and female adults and 
of appropriate teaching methods will preface 
student presentations on selected aspects and 
styles of adult ministry. Prerquisites: M-381 The 
Teaching Ministry of the Church or permission of 
instructor. 
Morris Th 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 



VL CANON LAW 

CTUM-421 

Church and Structure 

An introductory course in canon law, briefly 
treating the theology of law, history of canon law, 
interpretation, general norms, diocesan and 
supradiocesan structures, the Eastern rites, penal 
law, the magisterium. 

Huels MW 1:30-2:45 Fall 

Huels MW 12-1:15 Wmter 




35 



Old Testament 



WINTER 1985 
BIBLICAL STUDIES 

OLD AND NEW TESTAMENT 
I. GENERAL 

OLD TESTAMENT 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTU B-300 

Old Testament Introduction 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Hoppe Sec. A. MW 12-1:15 Fall 

Hoppc Sec. BM 7-9:30 p.m. Fall 

Bergant MW9-10:15 Winter 

CTS CH-301 

People & Faith of Israel I 

An introduction for beginning students to the pro- 
blems of the historical and theological interpreta- 
tion of the Old Testament against the background 
of the development of historical methods of biblical 
study. 
LaCocque MW 11-12:20 Winter 

LSTC B-311 

Old Testament Studies II 

A study of the prophetic movement from Elijah to 
the post-exilic prophets and the beginnings of 
eschatology and apocalypticism. 
Fuerst MW 1-2;15 Winter 

Klein MWF 9-9:50 

MTSB-312 

From David to Daniel: 

History, Literature, Theological Ferment 

A study of the Israelite and Jewish literature from II 
Samuel to I Maccabees, giving in-depth attention 
to representatives of each canonical division and 
literary category. Prerequisite: The course presup- 
poses familiarity with critical method as acquired 
in MTS B-301 or its equivalent. 
Baling TTh 10-11:50 Winter 

NETS B-324 

Old Testament II: Literature 

This coi:rse is an introduction to the Old Testa- 
ment as literature. Attention is given to various 
methodologies used in interpreting the Old Testa- 
ment such as text-, form-, redaction- and literature- 
criticism. The various literary forms are studied as 
carriers of the ancient Hebrew faith and revelation. 
Bjornard WF 2:30-3:50 Winter 



11. CANONICAL CORPUS 

BTS B-324 

Old Testament Exegesis: Genesis 

This course will use a study of Genesis to teach 
historical and literary exegetical methodology. The 
primary task will be to write an exegesis on a text in 
Genesis 12-50. Class discussion will focus on 
chapters 1-11. 
Roop TTh 9:30- 10:50 Winter 

BTS B-429 
Isaiah of the Exile 

This course explores Isaiah 40-55. It lc:)cates the 
message of these texts in the period of the exile. 
Selected texts will be studied as a way of hearing 
the broader message. 
Roop W 2:30-5:15 Winter 

CTU B-400 
Pentateuch 

Pentateuchal themes including the primeval 
history, patriarchs, exodus, Sinai and wilderness 
wanderings will be studied in the context of their 
literary origins and development and in the light of 
their importance for Ancient Israel's theology. At- 
tention will be given to the applicability of this 
theology to contemporary concerns. 
Bergant MW 12-1:15 Winter 

CTU B-415 
Later Prophecy 

Key passages from Ezekiel, Deuterc:)-Isaiah and 
some postexilic prophets will be studied for their 
value in struggling with ancient traditions and 
adapting them to new theological or historical 
situations. Important for appreciating the Old 
Testament background to church ministry, suffer- 
ing, redemption and re-creation. 
Stiihlmueller M 7-9:30 p.m. Winter 

CTU B-417 

From Daniel to Qumran 

A survey of the literature of early Judaism, its 
cultural and historical setting, its theological con- 
tent and its relationship to the Bible; an introduc- 
tion to the theological concerns of Palestinian 
Judaism which were reflected in the preaching of 
Jesus. 
Hoppe TTh 1 0:30- 1 1 :45 Winter 

LSTC B-614 

Deuteronomy and the Deuteronomists 

Studies in the book of Deuteronomy, the historical 
questions involved, and the literary and 



36 



theological factors related to it. (For post M.Div. 
students. Admission of others by permission of in- 
structor.) 
Fucrst TTh 11-12:15 Winter 

MTS B-444 
Psalms 

A study of the songs of the Psalter, with special at- 
tention to their formal characteristics, their societal 
origins, and their significance for the development 
o{ biblical theological perspectives. Kn.cnvledge of 
Hebrew will be useful but it is not reciuired. 
Bo/m^' MW 10-11:50 Winter 

NBTS B-428 

Interpretation of the Book of Jeremiah 

This seminar-type course will approach the btiok 
from the viewpoints of text and form, redaction 
and literature, psychology and theology, attempt- 
ing to merge historical exegesis with a relevant 
message. 
Bprnard MTk 1-2:20 Winter 



111. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 

CTU B-529 

Jewish Mysticism and Messianism 

A close examination of the mystical substratum of 
Jewish historical and religious experience through 
an indepth study of the messianic movements in 
Judaism from the talmudic period up tc) and in- 
cluding the Sabbatai Sevi. This cciurse will trace 
the stream of mystical thought and experience 
through the examination of pertinent historical 
texts and source material. 
Perelmuter MW 3-5:M), I /7 - 2/20 Vi'inter 

CTS CH.420 

The Notion of Covenant in the 

Intertestamental Literature 

A presentation of the Intertestamental Apocrypha 
and Pseudipigrapha around major themes. Their 
importance for O.T. Hermeneutics and the history 
of ideas in early Judaism and early Christianity will 
be emphasized. 
LaCncque T 2-5 Winter 

LSTC B-532 

The Isaiah Pericopes 

An exegetical seminar dealing with the lessons 



Old Testament 

from the Book of Isaiah, from which the Christian 
community has selected so many passages for its 
meditation that it constitutes practically a canon 
within the canon. Attention to textual criticism, 
literary, historical, theological, and hermeneutical 
analysis. Hebrew valuable but not required. 
(Prereq: LSTC B-310 and B-311 or equiv.) 
Michel TF 1-2:15 Winter 

MTS B-419 

The Exile and the Biblical Theology of Hope 

A study c:)f the historical experience in Israel known 
as the Exile in Babylon. An analysis of the literary 
and theological reactions of the leaders to maintain 
and develop hope in the midst of the captive com- 
munity. An evaluation of the contribution of the 
pc:)ets, historians, priests, prophets and theologians. 
Taught in Spanish. 
Pagan TBA Winter 



IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

BTS/NBTSB-311b 
Hebrew II 

This course is the second of a two quarter se- 
quence; see B-311a for a description. This course is 
offered jointly by BTS and NBTS. 

Nasgouuz TWF I- 1: 50 Win ter 

LSTC B-300 
Hebrew I 

In this course the students will become familiar 
with essential vocabulary used in Biblical Hebrew 
and gain a working knowledge of Hebrew grani- 
mar, thus acquiring a fundamental exegetical tool 
for the study of the Bible. 
Klein MTWF 8-8:50 Winter 

MTS B-32 1/322 

Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis, I, II 

A non-divisible two-quarter sequence in\'ol\ing 
the learning of the elements of Hebrew grammar 
followed by translation and exegesis of .selected por- 
tions of the Hebrew Bible, primarily prose. Atten- 
tion will be given to fundamentals of text criticism 
and general principles of biblical interpretation. 
Double cc)urse. 

Welborn MTWTh 9-9:50 Winter 

Camt^hell See. I: MTWTh 9-^) -.50 S/mni: 

See. 2: TF 2-3:50 S/inn.^ 



37 



New Testament 



NEW TESTAMENT 
L INTRODUCTORY 

CTU B-305 A & B 

New Testament Introduction 

The writings of the New Testament will be 
presented in their historical, cultural, religious and 
sociological context. Introduction to the 
methodological tools employed in New Testament 
research and the diverse theologies that comprise 
the New Testament witness to Jesus of Nazareth. 
Especially designed for those beginning a program 
of theological study or for those seeking a founda- 
tional knowledge of the New Testament for per- 
sonal or professional enrichment. 
Senior Sec. AT 7-9:30 p.m. Winter 

Karris Sec.BMWl :30-2 :45 Winter 

LSTCB-331 
Gospel Tradition 

A study of the content of the four gospels and the 
way each author structured and edited the tradi- 
tion so as to respond to specific needs of the 
church. Students will be introduced to the history 
of gospel study and given practice in the use of con- 
temporary critical methods. 

F. Danker MW 11 '12:1 5 Winter 

Krentz MWF 1141:50 Winter 

Linss MWF 9-9:50 Winter 

MTS B-302 
Jesus 

A basic entry course into the study of the New 
Testament focusing on the first three Gospels. 
Through discussion, assigned readings, exegetical 
work and critical ear for texts, we envision the rela- 
tions between commitment and criticism, and the 
ones between historical reconstruction and 
theological interpretation. 
Hilgert MW 10-11:50 Winter 



CTU B-452 

Pauline Theology and Writings 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Karris TTh 10:30-11:45 

Karris TTh 10:30-11:45 



Fall 
Winter 



CTS CH.424 

The Gospel of John 

A study of the structure, traditions and theology of 

the Gospel. 

Scroggs MW 11-12:20 Winter 

LSTC B-545 
Exegesis of Romans 

A study of the message of Paul's Epistle to the 
Romans and the principal concepts of Pauline 
theology, with a consideration of preaching on 
selected passages. (Prereq: Greek and LSTC B-332 
or equiv.) 
Linss MW 1-2:15 Winter 

LSTC B-547 

Proclamation Values in I and II Peter and Jude 

Exploration o( selected thematic problems and 
history-of-tradition factors, with emphasis on the 
theological contribution of these documents. For 
students who consider themselves past the Beginn- 
ing Greek level. 
F. Danker M7-10p.m. Winter 

NBTSB-331 
Synoptic Gospels 

This course has two foci: the context, development 
and writing of the Synoptic Gospels and their con- 
tent, the ministry of Jesus. The first half treats the 
Synoptic problem and the question of Jesus and the 
Gospels. The second half looks at the significant 
events and teachings of Jesus' ministry from the 
standpoint of source, form and redaction studies. 
TBA WF 10:40-12 Winter 



IL BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B-531 
Romans 

A study of selected passages in Romans to illustrate 
and discover the integration of theology with ex- 
egesis. 



Snyde 



WF 8-9:20 



Winter 



NBTS B-432C 
Exegesis of Luke 

The course is a consideration of the distinctives of 
Luke through a paragraph by paragraph study. At- 
tention is given to gospel criticism, redaction 
history, historical reliability and theological inter- 
pretation. The purpose of the gospel is studied in 
connection with the major themes and issues of the 
Acts. 
Scholer M 2:30-5:10 Winter 



38 



New Testament 



III. SELECT TOPICS IN 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B-418 

History of Christian Interpretation 

of Biblical Texts 

Texts important to Christian life and practice 
throughout the church's history will be examined 
in the ethical-political matrix which informed what 
questions Christians put to the text and in the 
socio-religious matrix which provided concrete 
context with the aid of which Christians expressed 
their questions and commitment, doubt and trust. 
Meyer TTh 11-12:20 Winter 

CTU B-490 

Biblical Foundations of Mission 

The attitude of the Bible towards the outside world 
will be investigated for direction in the world mis- 
sion of the Church today. In the Old Testament we 
attend to the cultural and moral interdependency 
of Israel with the nations. New Testament study 
will focus on the mission of Jesus and its interpreta- 
tion in the theologies of select writings. 
Stuhlmueller/ Senior TTh 9-10:15 Winter 

CTU B-491 

Liberation Hermeneutic and Sociological 

Exegesis 

Until recently biblical exegetes have been content 
to employ methods deriving from the humanities 
(history, language, literature, etc.). Latin American 
theologians and exegetes, however, guided by their 
own novel hermeneutic, prefer to borrow from the 
social and behavioral sciences (sociology, an- 
thropology, economics, politics, etc.). We will ex- 
amine various attempts recently made by liberation 
theologians to exploit the exegetical potential of 
'social criticism' and 'critical sociology.' 
Reynolds M 3-5:30 p.m. Winter 

CTU B-541 

Biblical Fundamentalism and Bible Churches 

A critical analysis of the fundamentalist intepreta- 
tion of the Bible; particular attention will be paid 
to the interpretive traditions of the 
Pentecostal/Holiness Church, Jehovah's Witnesses, 
Seventh-Day Adventists, Christian Science and 
the Worldwide Church of God among others. 
Hoppe T 1:30-4 Winter 



CTS CH-523 

Politics and Faith in the Early Church 

An exploration of the political dynamics in the 
Greco-Roman world which affected the social 
realities of the early church. The tension between 
Roman authority, the semi-autonomy of the Greek 
city, and the Jewish diaspora will be studied, and 
the early Christian communities placed in this con- 
text. Attention will be given to the influence of this 
political dynamic on the faith statements of the ear- 
ly church, especially those which have often been 
labeled 'anti-Jewish.' Prerequisite: CH-32I or 
equivalent. 
Scroggs TTh9:30-10:50 Winter 

LSTC B-601 

Graduate Biblical Seminar 

Graduate students in the biblical field will make 

presentations based on their specialized interests 

and scholarly research. (For post-M.Div. students 

only.) 

Krentz T 2:30-5 Winter 

NBTS B-430b 

Biblical Archaeology in Israel 

The course centers on a study trip to Israel. In addi- 
tion, there will be reading assignments and two 
papers. The same course may be offered with trips 
at other times and/or by other faculty. All travel 
costs are in addition to tuition. 
Scholer 12/26/84-1/1/85 Winter 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 
BTS B-4U 
Advanced Greek Grammar 

A study of the syntax of koine Greek as it il- 
luminates New Testament texts. 

Snyder WF 1-2:20 Winter 

LSTC B-309 

New Testament Greek II 

Completion of the two-quarter Greek sequence. 
Krentz M 2:30-3:45, TTh 9-9:50 Winter 

NBTS/BTS B-316b 
New Testament Greek II 

This course is the continuation and completion of 
B-3I6a New Testament Greek I. This course is of- 
fered jointly by BTS and NBTS, 
Holsey WF 1-2:20 Winter 



39 



New Testament 



Historical Studies 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

BTS H-347 

History of Christianity II 

An overview of the development of the Christian 
churches in the modern period. Topics include 
Protestant scholasticism and pietism, the 
evangelical revival, revolution and romanticism, 
the age of progress, the Roman Catholic reaction. 
Eastern Orthodoxy in the modern period, the 
ecumenical movement, and the churches and 
totalitarianism. 
Durnbaugh WF 8-9:20 Winter 

CTU H-300 A, B 
Early Christianity 

The development of doctrine and practice to 450 
A.D. Lecture topics include Trinitarian dogma, 
the person and work of Christ, the relation bet- 
ween human freedom and divine grace, and the 
development of sacramental practice. Required 
readings in primary materials will concentrate on 
Christian life and spirituality. Reading reports and 
examination. 

Chirovsky Sec. A TEA Wmtcr 

TEA Sec. E TEA Winter 

CTU H-325 

Models of Missionary Activity in the 

Church's History 

A survey is given of the variety of forms that mis- 
sionary activity has taken from the Apologists in 
the Roman Empire to the classical image of the 
I'-'th century missionary. An examination is made 
both of the factors that determined the model used 
and of its effectiveness. Project and examinations. 
Nemer M W 1 0:30- 1 1 :4^ Wmtcr 

CTS CH.345 

History of Christian Thought II 

From the Reformation through the nineteenth cen- 
tury. A survey of significant theological 
movements, with attention to their social context. 
A selected theme will provide focus. Theme for 
1984-5: Redemption. (This course may be elected 
independently c^f History of Christian Thought I.) 
Eass/Cummings MW 2-3:20 Winter 



LSTC H-350A 
American Church History 

The pluralistic development of religious ideas, 
movements, and institutions in America from col- 
onial times to the present. The course surveys the 
total religious milieu, including the rise of new 
religious movements. 
Scherer MWF 9-9:50 Winter 

MTSH-3 19/320 

The Growth of the Christian Tradition: 

A History of Christian Doctrine 

(For course description see Fall Introductory.) 
Rigdon TTh 10-11:50 Fall, 319 

MW 10-11:50 Winter, 320 

NETS C-341H 

Early and Medieval Christianity: 

An Inquiry from the Underside of History 

This course, which is taught in Spanish, is an inter- 
pretative analysis from the perspective of the poor 
of major issues and developments in Christian life 
and thought from the second century to the Refor- 
mation. Intensive reading, in both primary and 
secondary sources, is emphasized as a basis for 
meaningful classroom discussion. 
Araya MTh 6-8:40 p.m., 1/7 - 2/8 Winter 

NETS C-342H 

Reformation and Modern Christianity: 

An Inquiry from the Underside of History 

This course, which is taught in Spanish, is an inter- 
pretative analysis from the perspective of the poor 
of major issues and developments in Christian life 
and thought from the Reformation to the present. 
Intensive reading, in both primary and secondary 
sources, is emphasized as a basis for meaningful 
classroom discussion. Prerequisites: Preferably 
C-341H Early and Medieval Christianity: An In- 
quiry from the Underside of History. 
Araya MTh6-8:40 p.m., 2/ 11 - 3/15 Winter 



IL HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 
TRADITIONS 

LSTC H-350E 

American Lutheran Church History 

A course focusing on Lutheranism in America, 
especially on the problem of unity and polariza- 
tion. The historical development is viewed against 
the broad background of Christianity in America. 
(An alternative to LSTC H-350A.) 
Fischer MWF 11-11 :50 Winter 



40 



Historical Studies 



LSTC H-458 

Lutheran Union in Historical Perspective 

A historical study of the attempts to unite the 
Lutherans of America, describing the formation of 
major Lutheran church bodies, analyzing the prin- 
ciples of union they espoused, and reflecting on the 
significance of the past for the present Lutheran 
and ecumenical situation. 
Tietjcn T 2:30-5 Winter 

M/LH-431 

History of Universalism 

A survey of the history of the Universalist move- 
ment and denomination in America with emphasis 
given to recurrent themes in that history, such as 
the meaning of suffering, the purpose of life, the 
heretic as prophet and priest. 
Johnson TBA Winter 

MIL H-437 

Indian and Far Eastern Religions 

A survey of religious literature, belief and practice 
in India and the Far East, with emphasis on the 
traditional faiths of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism 
and Confucianism. 
Reeves TBA Winter 

MIL H-440 

The Enlightenment and Religious Liberalism 

A study of the Enlightenment and its influence on 
the rise of liberal theology within the Lutheran, 
Reformed, Anglican, and Dissenting traditions and 
in the churches of the American colonial and early 
national periods. We shall read and discuss major 
philosophical and theological works to assess 
themes and issues that originated and continued 
the influence of the Enlightenment. Each student 
will prepare and present a paper on a major thinker 
or issue. 
Godbey TBA Winter 

NBTS C-443 
Baptist History 

This course is an inquiry into major issues and 
developments in Baptist History, particularly in 
America. Special attention will be given to Baptist 
institutions and practices, including an: 1) explora- 
tion of their origins, 2) investigation of their sup- 
porting rationale, 3) analysis of shaping influences 
on them over the years and 4) evaluation of their 
long-range significance. Prerequisites: Preferably 
C-342 Reformation and Modern Christianity or 
C-442 Protestant Evangelicalism. 
Ohlmann MTh 1-2:20 Winter 



NBTS C-444 
Denominational Heritage 

This course is intended to meet the requirements of 
denominational heritage for non-Baptists. 
Readings and assignments will be individually 
tailored for each student. Class sessions will vary 
according to the configuration of the class bur will 
include individual sessions with the instructor, 
small group meetings and some full class sessions. 
Dayton M 9:30- 1 2: 10 Winter 



III, HISTORY - INDIVIDUALS 

LSTC H-435 
Theology of Luther 

The purpc:)se of this ct:)urse is to introduce the stu- 
dent to Luther's theology in its broad comprehen- 
siveness and its dynamic thrust. Selected works in 
various categories are discussed in class. The stu- 
dent reads other works of his or her own choosing 
and prepares a term paper. 
Fischer MW 1-2:15 Winter 

MTS H-401 

Seminar on the Theology of John Calvin 

A systematic study of Calvin's theology as seen 
primarily in the Institutes of the Christian Religion. 
Rigdon T 1-4 Winter 



IV. AMERICAN 
CHURCH HISTORY 

MTS H-350 

Christianity and Society in 

American History 

The story of American Christianity as it pursued 
its own internal development and interacted with 
the ongoing American culture. Emphasis will be 
placed on events, people, and movements that 
throw light on the situation o( the American 
church today. 
Schafer MW 2-3:50 Winter 



V. SELECT TOPICS 
IN CHURCH HISTORY 

CTU H-422 

19th Century Europe and World Mission 

A study is made of the Church of Europe as it en- 
counters the new world born of the French Revolu- 
tion as a context for her missionary movement. 
Major considerations are given to the Church's en- 
counter with French and Italian political liberalism 



41 



Historical Studies 



Theological Studies 



and with German and English philosophical and 
theological liberalism as well as the development of 
Imperialism in Europe. A student chooses a 
Church in a particular country outside of Europe 
to examine in-depth and then to reflect on the 
characteristics of the missionary movement to that 
country. 
Nemer TTh 10:304 1:45 Winter 

CTU H-430 

Vatican II: Problem or Solution? 

The first part of this course will concentrate on the 
Second Vatican Council: the background, the per- 
sonalities, the problems, the solutions. The re- 
mainder of the course will examine the post- 
conciliar Church, its life and goals, with the inten- 
tion of discovering whether or not Vatican II can 
respond to the problems of the post-conciliar 
Church. There will be bi-weekly reading reports 
from an approved syllabus. For the final, two weeks 
are allowed for the development of a topic syn- 
thesizing class matter and readings. 
Ross W 7-9:30 p.m. Winter 



MTS H-486 

The Development of Hispanic Protestantism 

in the United States 

The design of the course will give students a 
knowledge and appreciation of the history and 
development of Protestant ministry among 
Hispanics in the U.S. Specifically, modes of 
ministry will be studied, including attitudes and 
values employed in such modes. 
Armenddriz W 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 

M/L H.441 

The Theologies of Servetus and of Socinianism 

Readings of works (in English) about Michael 
Servetus and Socinianism will be accompanied by 
lectures drawn from original sources and studies in 
other languages. We shall compare Servetian and 
Socinian theologies and their influence on the rise 
of Unitarian theology. Students will prepare and 
present papers, after consultation with the pro- 
fessor. 
Godbey TBA Winter 



CTS CH-490 
Women & Religion: 
The Literary Imagination 

Imaginative literature holds major resources for 
reflection upon the spiritual experiences and 
theological insights of women. This course will 
focus on some excellent examples of such fiction 
and poetry, including that of Emily Dickinson, 
Virginia Woolf, and Alice Walker, with some at- 
tention to related literary criticism and theology. 
Bass Th 9:30-12:20 Winter 

LSTC H.415 

Studies in Ancient Christian Thought 

A study of Patristic theology on specific topics such 
as authority, the church, Christology, and the 
sacraments. Emphasis on the interpretation of 
primary sources in translation. 
Hendel TTh 11-12:15 Winter 

LSTC H.614 

The Writing and Interpretation of 

Church History 

Examples of contemporary church historical 
writing from selected countries and contexts are 
analyzed for basic structural paradigms and inter- 
pretive motifs. Careful attention to historical 
methodology. (For post-M.Div. students. Admis- 
sion of others by consent of the instructor.) 
Scherer Th 7-10 p.m. Winter 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

L INTRODUCTORY AND 

FOUNDATIONAL 

CTU T.325 
Introduction to Theology 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Linnan Sec. A. MW 9-10:15 Fall 

Graff Sec. BMW 10:30-1 1 :45 Fall 

Hayes MW 10:30-11:45 Winter 

CTS TEC-391 

The Black Religious Heritage II 

A study of the development of black religious in- 
stitutions by exploring 1) the historical process in 
which they emerged, 2) the theological, ethical and 
moral traditions associated with them, and 3) their 
role as institutions in the pastoral/therapeutic care 
of black people. (TEC 390, offered Fall 1984, sug- 
gested but not required.) 
Cummingsetal. M 6:30-9:30 p.m. Winter 

LSTCT-312 
Christian Theology II 

For description of the Christian Theology se- 
quence, see Christian Theology I. The second 
course in the sequence deals with the human con- 
dition (including sin and evil) and the Person and 
Work of Christ. 

Braaten MWF 9-9:50 Winter 

Braaten MWF 11-11:50 Winter 



42 



Theological Studies 



MTST.301 
Introduction to Theology 

This course explores the major Christian doctrines 
(such as God, Christ, Spirit, Church). It attempts 
to show their historic integrity, their systematic 
relations and problems, and their contemporary 
significance as meaningful interpretations of reali- 
ty. Recommended for all first year students. 
Biirkhart MW 2-3:50 Winter 

NBTS C-354 

Christian Theology II: 

An Eschatological Approach 

This course is an introduction to the basic issues of 
systematic theology which begins from the early 
Christian proclamation of the life, death, resurrec- 
tion, exaltation and expected return of Jesus, and 
the lifestyle which it generated. The course ex- 
plores eschatology, revelation and the work of Jesus 
Christ. Prerequisites: C-353 Christian Theology I 
or consent of the instructor. 
Finger TTh 1142:20 Winter 



11. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

CTUT-521 

Theology of Edward Schillebeeckx 

A study of the main lines of the thought of Edward 

Schillebeeckx, emphasizing his understanding of 

the relation of God and the world, and questions of 

hermeneutics. 

Schreiter T 1:30-4 Winter 

GTS CH-390B 

Inquiries into Methodism: 

History &. Polity 

Rationale: As polity is closely linked with 
Methodism's history and experience, knowledge of 
the historical movement of polity affords perspec- 
tive for what is happening currently, hence the 
focus will be on polity. 
Biackwell et al. Th 6:30-9:30 Winter 

CTS TEC.532b 
Whitehead 

Prerequisite: CTS TEC-532a. A seminar for the 
development and oral defense of papers dealing 
with some aspect of Whitehead's thought. The first 
month of the term will be devoted to a considera- 
tion of selected writings of Whitehead. After a 
reading period during which students develop their 
papers, the final portion of the term will be devoted 



to an oral defense of the students' papers before 

members of the seminar. 

Schroeder T 2-5 p.m. Winter 

LSTC T-525 

Irenaeus: Theology between East and West 

A study of the life and times of this second century 
Bishop of Lyon, born and trained in the East but of 
Western ancestry. Attention to the Gnostic pro- 
blem of thinking either too highly or too contemp- 
tuously of humankind, the Imago Dei, the Incarna- 
tion and implications for ministry. (Prereq: LSTC 
H-310 or equiv.) 
Tobias MW 1-2:15 Winter 

LSTC T-460 

Theology of Eastern Orthodoxy 

An exploration of areas of theology distinctively 
Eastern and Orthodox, e.g., the locus and function 
of theology (mystical and apophatic), ikons and 
other epiphanic means, eucharistic ecclesiology, 
apostolic continuity, as well as some issues debated 
with the West (filioque, theosis vs. justification, 
etc.). 
Tobias M7-I0p.n\. Winter 

M/L TS-395 

Liberal Theology and Mythos 

Introduction to liberal theology in a double sense: 
an introduction to the major theological perspec- 
tives current in organized liberal religion; and an 
introduction to a general method by which to 
think theologically about our various understan- 
dings of liberal faith. The major theological 
perspectives considered are Liberal Christianity, 
Empirical Theism, Religious Humanism, Scientific 
Theology, and Universal Religion. The method 
chosen defines theology as "reflection upcm mythos 
or religious story." 
Engel TBA Winter 

NBTS C-655 

Theology and Ethics of Paul Tillich 

This course will examine basic themes \n the 
theology and ethics of Paul Tillich. The primary 
resources is to be Tillich's Systematic Theology. 
Reference will also be made to Tillich's occasional 
writings. A preliminary essay, class presentations, 
and a research paper will be required. 
Miller 2/4 -2/8, all day Winter 



43 



Theological Studies 



IIL SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 

CTU T-430 

The Problem of God in Contemporary Society 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Szura MW 12-1:15 Fall 

Burrows TTh 9- 10:15 Winter 

CTU T-440 
Christology 

A critical review of Scriptural and traditional inter- 
pretations of Incarnation and Salvation in an effort 
to arrive at an articulation of what Jesus Christ and 
redemption mean for contemporary people. 

Hayes MW 1:30-2:45 Winter 

CTUT-441 
Christology and Cultures 

A critical review of the development of under- 
standings of Jesus and salvation in the Christian 
tradition, and their implications in a cross-cultural 
context. Special attention is given to models of in- 
carnation and salvation, universal claims about 
Jesus within a religious pluralism, and the question 
of the ethnic Christ. 
Burrows TTh 12-1:15 Winter 

CTU T-445 

Theology of the Church 

A study of the origins of the Church; the relation 
of the Kingdom to the Church; the basic images 
and themes in Scripture and tradition; the develop- 
ment of ecclesiastical office; and the relation of the 
Church to the world, especially in relation to the 
socio-political situation of Third World countries. 
Linnan MW 9-10:15 Winter 

CTU T-480 

Eastern Christian Theology 

An investigation of the principal topics in theology 
(God, Christ, anthropology, church, tradition) and 
spirituality from the perspective of the Eastern 
Christian traditions. Emphasis will be placed on 
contemporary understandings in the Orthodox 
and Catholic communions. 
Chirovsky W 3-5:30 p.m. Winter 

CTS TEC-485 

Theology of Peacemaking 

Approaches to the theological task in a nuclear 
age. Doctrines of God, Creation, human nature 
and eschatology are particular theological foci. 
Consideration of the U.C.C. as a "Peace Church." 
Thistlethwaite T 6:30-9:30 p.m. Winter 



CTS TEC-506 
Alienation and Trust 

The theological significance of alienation and trust 
in light of the study of these phenomena as 
psychosocial dimensions of human experience. 
LeFevre T 9:30-12:20 Winter 

LSTC T-461 
Feminist Theology 

An exploration of some of the reformist, post- 
Christian, and radical Christian challenges that 
have emerged in recent feminist theology, with 
discussion of their implications for praxis. 
Bloomqmst TTh 11-12:15 Winter 

LSTC T-633 

Contemporary Interpretations of 

Jesus as Saviour 

This seminar will investigate a range of contem- 
porary Christologies with a view to analyzing the 
soteriology which is presupposed by each 
Christological proposal. The variety of 
Christologies will be compared according to a six- 
fold typology. (For post-M.Div. students. Admis- 
sion of others by consent of instructor.) 
Snook T 2:30-5 Winter 

MTS T-406 

The Doctrine of the Spirit 

A consideration of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit 
in the Christian theological tradition. Attention 
will be given to some current manifestations of the 
Spirit in the life and work of the churches. 
Parker TTh 9-1 1:50 Winter 

NETS C'454 

Recent Theological Thought 

This course is an analysis of major themes and 
movements in twentieth century theology gained 
through careful reading and discussion of works by 
its major thinkers. Movements covered will include 
late Liberal theology, neo-Orthodoxy, Existential 
theology, recent Catholic theology, Liberation 
theologies. Process theology, theology of Hope and 
Narrative theology. 
Finger W 7-9:40 p.m. Winter 

NETS C'554 

The Person of Jesus Christ 

Beginning with the Christological controversies of 
the first four centuries, this course will explore the 
major issues connected with the Person of Christ, 
especially that of his Diety in relation to his 
humanity. Modern Christologies will then be con- 



44 



Ethics Studies 



Theological Studies 



sidered and students will conclude the course with 
a major paper on what it means for them to confess 
the Diety of Christ today. 
Finger M 2:30-5 -.10 Winter 



IV. SPIRITUALITY AND 

SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTU M-415 
Ministerial Spirituality 

A theological reflection on the interaction between 
personal growth and ministry. A preliminary look 
at the biblical tradition of the Servant of the Lord, 
to better determine the idea of ministry in its 
spiritual implications. N.T. Diakonia and commit- 
ment to the Church as a source of spirituality: 
preaching, leading prayer, healing, sharing. Ten- 
sions: prayer and activity, factors of growth and of 
alienation. The unifying role of faith, hope, love. 
Suffering in ministry. Experiencing the movements 
of the Spirit. A case study: Spirituality and com- 
mitment to a process of liberation. 
Lozano TTh9-iO:i5 Winter 

CTU M-419 

The Experience of God in Human Oppression, 

A Spirituality of Liberation 

This course develops a reflection on present forms 
of spirituality of liberation (Latin American, Asian, 
Black, Feminist). Themes highlighted include ap- 
peal to a radical conversion, discipleship and com- 
mitment, poverty and the poor, the liberating ex- 
perience of prayer, a ministry of solidarity, love 
and anger, the experience of the Spirit. A final 
paper is required. 
Lozano TTh 12-1:15 Winter 

CTU M-483, 484, 485 

Advanced Ministry Practicum: Spirituality 

(For course description see Fall.) 
McCarth:^ TBA Fall 483 /Winter 484/ 

Spring 485 

CTSTEC-561 

Psychopathology in Theological Perspective 

A seminar designed to assist the advanced student 
in the task of pastoral diagnostics. A 
phenomenological examination of 

psychopathology will be the occasion for 
theological reflection on the nature and dynamics 
of alienation, sin, and evil as manifest in human 
personality. This course should be especially 



helpful for students with focused interest in 

pastoral counseling or spiritual direction. 

Moore M 6:30-9:30 p.m. Winter 

NBTS M-497a 

Female Models of Spirituality 

The life and writings of selected Christian women 
of various times and cultures will be studied. Each 
student will report on a different woman and will 
lead an experiential session based on her work. 
Morn's Th 7-9:40 p.m. Winter 



ETHICAL STUDIES 
L MORAL THEOLOGY 

CTU E-379 

Christian Ethics: The Moral Agent 

(For course description, see Fall.) 



hlairn 
Nairn 



MW12-1:15 
MW 1:30-2:45 



Fall 
Winter 



MTSE-311 
Scripture and Ethics 

This is an introductory course in the field of 
theological ethics. Its purpose is to familiarize the 
student with some of the various ethical perspec- 
tives found in Scripture and some of the various 
ways theologians use Scripture to justify their 
ethical options. 
Garcia F 9-1 1:50 Winter 

MTS E.313 

Introduction to Christian Ethics 

This is an elementary course in Christian ethics. It 
seeks to familiarize the student with the vocabulary 
and analytical instruments of differentiation and 
clarification used in philosophical and theological 
ethics. It also seeks to familiarize the student with 
some of the substantive issues which concern 
Christian ethicists. 
Garcia TTh 10-11:50 Winter 



IL SOCIAL AND 
POLITICAL ETHICS 

BTS E-467 

Seminar: Theology of Bonhoeffer 

The seminar will focus on the life and writings of 
Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Special attention will be given 
to his doctrine of the church, theology of 



45 



Ethics Studies 



discipleship, ethics, and themes from his prison let- 
ters. 
Broun M 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

BTS E-369 

Peace Studies Seminar 

The seminar runs continually throughout the year. 
It offers opportunity for common reading of peace- 
related materials; presentation and discussion of 
papers; sharing from peace ministries; and dialogue 
with visiting peace theologians, activists, and 
leaders. One quarter hour credit per quarter. 
Broivn T 3: 10-4 -.40 Winter 

BTS E-466 

The Church, the State, and War 

Readings focused on the traditional and current 
Christian attitudes toward the state and problems 
of peace and war. 
Durnbaugh WF 10:40-12 Winter 

CTU E-375 

Theological Foundations of Social Ethics 

An exploration of the theological sources which 
have informed, and the theological ground, which 
serve to justify, a variety of perspectives on social 
justice. Attention will be given to foundational 
texts in the Roman Catholic and Protestant tradi- 
tions, and to the ways in which these texts in- 
fluence contemporary writing in social ethics. 
Wadell MW 3-4:15 Winter 

CTU E-488 

Marxist Humanism and Christian Faith 

The course will study the problem of the accultura- 
tion of the Christian faith within the marxist 
culture and political context. The course will study 
key concepts and fundamental socio-political struc- 
tures of marxism, in view of disclosing their even- 
tual capacity to become cultural expression of 
Christian faith and praxis. 
Fornasari MW 12-1:15 Win ter 

CTU M-492, 493, 494 

Advanced Ministry Practicum: Social Justice 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Szura TBA Fall 492 /Winter 493/ 

Spring 494 

CTS TEC-439 
Economics and Morality 

Examination of the moral bases of alternative 
economic systems. Readings will be drawn from 
representative theorists emphasizing the merits of 



relatively free market capitalism, social market 
capitalism, and socialism. Both economists and 
Christian social ethicists will be included in the 
discussion. Participants may select a term project 
focused either on a specific economic problem or 
on a more general constructive formulation. 
Schroeder W 2:5 Winter 

CTS TEC-456 

Empirical Studies in American Religion 

Examination of representative empirical studies of 
American religion and their relevance to contem- 
porary religious institutions. Sociological theories 
and methods as well as theological assumptions 
underlying these studies will be analysed and 
discussed. 
Fukuyama Th 9:30-12:20 Winter 

NBTS C-458bH: Social Ethics II: 

An Historical Third World Perspective 

This course, which is taught in Spanish, is an in- 
quiry -from the perspective of the poor -of major 
socio-ethical thinkers and movements in the Chris- 
tian tradition from the Reformation to the Com- 
munist Manifesto, giving special attention to those 
of contestative intentionality as expressions of the 
subversive character of Christian faith. Prere- 
quisites: C 458aH or consent of the instructor. 
Mottesi T 6-8:40 p.m. Winter 

NBTS C-558 

Christian Faith and Marxism: 

A Mutual Challenge 

This course is a comparative analysis of the 
ideological roots, the historic origin and 
developments, and the key concepts of both tradi- 
tions. Particular attention will be given to revolu- 
tionary Christian movements and the Marx- 
ist critique of religion in their contemporary 
mutual challenges, as well as factual experiences of 
renewal and enrichment. Prerequisites: Senior 
M.Div. and M.A. students. Priority will be given to 
Social Ethics majors; others by consent of the in- 
structor only. 
Mottesi W 2:30-5:10 Winter 



III. SELECT TOPICS IN ETHICS 

BTS E-565 

The Ethics of Paul Tillich 

A seminar study of the writings of Paul Tillich, 
especially the Systematic Theology, in order to 
discover his method and the fundamental concepts 



46 



World Mission Studies 



Ethical Studies 



of his thought and to assess the applicability o{ his 

ideas to contemporary issues. 

Miller 8-9:20 Winter 

CTU E-537 

Ethics and the Emotions 

One presupposition of ethics is that it deals with ra- 
tional people acting rationally in situations after 
ample reflection. This course asks whether the 
above presupposition is in fact valid. In doing so, it 
will investigate both moral theories and 
psychological theories, especially those dealing 
with emotions and the unconscious. 
McCarthy /Nairr^ T 1-30-4 Wmter 

CTU E-553 

Catholic Moral Theology after Vatican II: 

An Appraisal 

Twenty years ago the Second Vatican Council 
challenged Catholic moral theologians to make the 
faithful more conscious of their common vocation 
in Christ. This course will examine the major 
developments and themes in Catholic moral 
theology since the Council in light of this 
challenge. Particular attention will be given to the 
influence of Karl Rahner on contemporary 
Catholic morality, as well as the writings of Cur- 
ran, McDonagh, and others. 
Wadell MW 9-10:15 Winter 

CTU E.580 

Readings in the Theology and Ethics of 

Christian Marriage 

A guided reading and discussion course which 
deals with a Christian anthropology of human 
love, traditional church teaching on the theology 
of marriage, and some contemporary concerns and 
problems for marriage and family life. 
Diesbourg Th 12-1:15 Winter 

LSTC E-614 

Contemporary Theological Ethics 

A study of major attempts at a systematic 
theological ethic in the generation since Tillich and 
Niebuhr, with emphasis on methodological ques- 
tions. Readings in such figures as Gustafson, 
Hauerwas, Wogaman, Ramsey, Curran, Maguire, 
Moltmann, Pannenberg, Dussel, Miguez Bonino. 
(For post-M.Div. students. Admission of others by 
consent of instructor.) 
Sherman TF 1-2:15 Winter 



MTS E-433 
Seminar in Ethics 

In alternate years the seminar will address issues of 
current importance, with a focus on contemporary 
sources for reflection, and persons of importance in 
the area o{ Christian thought. The topic for 
1984-85 is Dietrich Bonhoeffer. 
Stotts F 9-1 1:50 Winter 

NETS C-458d 
Issues in Social Ethics 

This seminar-style class will focus on a single issue 
each year and probe it from various angles 
(biblical, historical, theological, social scientific as 
appropriate). The emphasis will be on method. 
Topics under consideration include homosexuali- 
ty, war/nuclear warfare, the use of scripture in 
ethical reflection, etc. 
Dayton T 7-9:40 p.m. Winter 



WORLD MISSION STUDIES 

BTS M-477 

Contemporary Issues in International Mission 

A team-taught seminar ( = CTU W-450 & NBTS 
M-477a) that will engage students and faculty from 
three Cluster seminaries. Students will work in 
teams on selected issues that confront the church 
in mission on six continents. The three faculty will 
serve in resource and reflective roles. The seminar 
will meet weekly at Shalom House, 4064 South 
Lake Park, Chicago. 
Brown /Bakke /Barbour T 7-9:40 p.m. Winter 

CTU T-507 

Doing Theology in Local Situations: 

The Philippine Context 

A study of the development of contextual theology 

within the Filipino context. A study of the 

theological and historical-cultural forces shaping 

the milieu. The current situation will be discussed 

through the ideas of contemporary Filipino 

theologians. 

Beltran MW 12-1:15 Winter 

CTU T-542 

Finding Christ in Culture 

A study of the use of scientific methods, specifically 
those of the social sciences, for doing christology in 
local contexts. The Philippines will be used as an 
example. Theological reflection on empirical results 
and sociological analyses, together with reflec- 



47 



World Mission Studies 



Ministry Studies 



tion of the significance anci role of traditional 
christological doctrines to create a relevant pastoral 
theology and praxis for a local context. 
Beltran MW 3-4:15 Winter 

CTU T-561 

Trends in Mission Theology 

A seminar looking at selected issues facing the mis- 
sionary activity of the Church today. 

Gittins MW 1:30-2:45 Winter 

CTU W-446 

Initiatory Rites and Christian Initiation 

This seminar will make a comparative study of in- 
itiatory rites in traditional religions and Christiani- 
ty. Their nature, function and signficance will be 
reviewed by studying the ritual of death and 
rebirth in both traditional and Christian initia- 
tion. African and Native American Churches will 
be used as case studies. 
Barbour W 7-9:30 p.m. Winter 

CTU W-450 

Contemporary Issues in International Mission 

A team taught seminar ( = BTS M-477 & NBTS 
M-477a) that will engage students and faculty from 
three Cluster seminaries: BTS, CTU and NBTS. 
Students will work in teams on selected issues that 
confront the church in mission on six continents. 
The three faculty will serve in resource and reflec- 
tive roles. The seminar will meet weekly at Shalom 
House, 4064 South Lake Park, Chicago. 
Barbour /Bakke/ Brown T 7-9:40 p.m. Winter 

CTU W497 

Mission Integration Seminar 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Staff M 7-9:30 p.m. Fall 

Staff TBA Winter 

CTU W-545 

Cultural Anthropology for Missionaries 

A course in cultural anthropology, with special 
reference made to its use in missionary settings and 
for investigations into contextualization. 
Gittins MW 9-10:15 Winter 

LSTC W-422 

The Church in the People's Republic of China 

Today 

An examination of recent developments in the Peo- 
ple's Republic of China with reference to the 
reopening of churches, the burgeoning of Christian 
house gatherings, and the new role of the church in 



Chinese society. Discussion of the search for a post- 
denominational identity, the training of clergy and 
lay leadership, and relationships to the world 
church. 
Vikner TF 1-2:15 Winter 

LSTC W-429 

Introduction to the Faith and Practice 

of Islam 

An exploration of the basic religious teachings of 
Islam, including themes like the meaning of Islam, 
the nature of prophethood, who is a Muslim, and 
early questions in Muslim theology. Some time will 
also be given to basic study of the Prophet Muham- 
mad and the Qur'an, and to the question of how 
Islam relates inter-religiously with Christianity and 
Judaism. 
Vogelaar MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

NBTS M-477a 

Contemporary Issues In International Mission 

A team taught seminar ( = BTS M-477 & NBTS 
W-450) that will engage students and faculty from 
three Cluster seminaries. Students will work in 
teams on selected issues that confront the church 
in mission on six continents. The three faculty will 
serve in resource and reflective roles. The seminar 
will meet weekly at Shalom House, 4064 South 
Lake Park, Chicago. 
Bakke /Barbour /Brown T 7-9:40 p.m. Winter 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

L THE NATURE AND PRACTICE 

OF MINISTRY 

CTU M-380, 385, 390 
Basic Ministry Practicum 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Staff TBA Fall 380/Winter 385 

Spring 390 

CTU M-436 

Theological Basis for Community Organizing: 

Theory and Practice 

A study of the theological and sociological reasons 
for organizing in Hispanic oppressed communities. 
We will investigate the social doctrines of the 
Church since Vatican II and show how they apply 
to the Hispanic experience. 
Guerrero MW 10:30-11:45 Winter 



48 



Pastoral Studies 



Ministry Studies 



LSTC M-371 
Multicultural Ministry 
(Ministerios Multiculturales) 

Ministry in the United States takes place in con- 
texts which call for intercultural communication. 
In this course the approach is in terms of a total ex- 
perience, involving simulations, visits to ministry 
sites, interviews, reflection time, and strategy ses- 
sions. Taught bilingually in English and Spanish. 
I^avarro TF 1-2:15 Winter 

LSTC M-450 

Senior Seminar II: 

Parish Life and Leadership 

A study of church administration in general, with 
emphasis on the particular functions of the pastor 
and the laity in parish life and leadership. Half of 
the course time is spent in the classroom, half in 
workshops. For seniors at LSTC. 
Bozcman /Conrad TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 



MTS M-373 

The Urban Ministry of the Church 

Designed in part as a traveling seminar in urban 
mission, this course will confront a wide range of 
contextual dynamics and an equal range of church 
ministry responses. Students should expect to 
negotiate some schedule options to take advantage 
of urban events. Readings, reflective journal and 
group participation will be the basis of student 
evaluation. 
Bakke TBA Winter 

NETS M-372 

Church Administration 

This course explores the concept of the ministry 

and its duties. The organization and program of the 

local church receives attention in its relationship to 

the community, the denomination and the world 

mission. 

Goddard Th 2:30-5:10 Winter 



LSTC M-472 

The Church as Actor or Reactor in Society 

A consideration of the theological-ethical hurdles 

that keep the church confined to the private arena 

and from becoming an effective actor in the public 

arena, including issues such as "two kingdoms," 

power, and self-interest. Concrete models will be 

discussed. 

Bloomquist Th7-10p.m. Winter 

LSTC M-475 

Town and Country Ministry 

A seminar which will investigate social, political, 
and economic characteristics of rural life and how 
the church functions in this environment. Special 
attention to the styles of pastoral leadership called 
for in this setting. A field experience in a town and 
country setting will be arranged and is a require- 
ment of the course. (Open to LSTC students only.) 
Niedeiithal T 2:30-5 Winter 

MTS M-307 

Preparing for Ministry: Polity and Worship in 

the Presbyterian Church U.S.A. 

Students are prepared for thinking and acting effec- 
tively in the various church structures they enter. 
Special attention is given to the relation between 
polity, politics and church life. Presbyterian 
students will receive specific assistance in relation 
to Standard Ordination Examinations in polity 
and worship. Attention is also given to the process 
of seeking a call to a position in the church. Recom- 
mended for Middlers. 
Worley M 6:30-9:30 p.m. Winter 



NETS M-464 
Ministry in Lombard 

A Seminar in Community Exegesis and Ministry 
Design. Participants will explore the community 
areas adjacent to the campus geographically, social- 
ly, politically, economically, ideologically, racially, 
and ecclesiastically, then work at developing com- 
munity based ministry strategies for student in- 
volvements that are theologically significant, 
socially sensitive and ecclesiologically appropriate. 
Bakke T 2-4:40 Winter 



11. PASTORAL CARE 

ETS M-381 

Introduction to Care and Counseling 

This course involves an introduction to personality 
theory from several perspectives, an introduction 
to ethics as a theological component of all counsel- 
ing, a study of human documents through ver- 
batim transcripts of caring conversations, and 
beginning training in skills of listening and 
diagnosis. 
Poling TTh 8-9:20 Winter 

ETS M.584 

Case Conference 1 qhr 

This course involves weekly one-hour sessions of 
three to five students who are involved in regular 
counseling in a local church or a clinical setting. 
Three hours credit for the academic year. 
Poling TBA Winter 



49 



Pastoral Studies 



BTS M-389 

The Minister As Spiritual Director 

The course will examine the nature of ministry as 
spiritual direction, especially from the standpoint 
of a Protestant spirituality that has been in- 
fluenced by Roman Catholic and Orthodox 
spirituality. Emphasis will be placed on one's ability 
to enter into the religious world of another person, 
to help another person on spiritual pilgrimage, and 
to assess both self and another in terms of religious 
language and faith. 
Faus/Poling W 2:30-5 : 15 Winter 

CTU M-402 

Theological Topics in Jungian Thought 

A survey of the psychology of Carl Jung is followed 
by the identification and exploration of its 
theological implications and relevance. Special at- 
tention will be paid to the topic of symbol — in Jung 
and in comparison to its treatment by other 
thinkers. 
McCarthy TTh 10:30' 11 -.45 Winter 

CTU M.405 

Introduction to Basic Pastoral Counseling 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Mallonee MW 9-10:15 Fall 

Mallonee TTh 9-10:15 Winter 

McCarthy TTh 10:30-11:45 Spring 

CTU M-489, 490, 491 
Advanced Ministry Practicum: 
Community Development 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Szura TBA Fall 489 /Winter 490/ 

Spring 491 

CTU M-507 

Readings in Cross-Cultural Counseling 

Introductory seminar focusing on 1) general issues 
and concepts in counseling the culturally different; 
and 2) on specific populations in the United States. 
Mallonee T 1:30-4 Winter 

CTS CM-414 
Mysticism 

This seminar examines historical and contem- 
porary understandings of the mystical experience. 
Seminar members are encouraged to share their 
own encounters and experimentations with 
mystical experiencing. 
Anderson T 9:30-12:20 Winter 



CTS CM-500 

Topics in Psychotherapy: 

Jungian Psychoanalysis 

An advanced course in psychotherapeutic theory 
and technique. lEnroUment limited to 20]. 
Moore W 9:30-12:20 Winter 

CTS TEC-561 

Psychopathology in Theological Perspective 

A seminar designed to assist the advanced student 
in the task of pastoral diagnostics. A 
phenomenological examination of 

psychopathology will be the occasion for 
theological reflection on the nature and dynamics 
of alienation, sin, and evil as manifest in human 
personality. This course should be especially 
helpful for students with focused interest in 
pastoral counseling or spiritual directiori. 
Moore M 6:30-9:30 Winter 

CTSCM-551 

Advanced Gestalt Therapy and 

Pastoral Counseling 

Intensive experience and exploration of the theory 
of Gestalt Therapy giving special attention to its 
relevance for pastoral counseling both in the parish 
setting and in specialized ministries. Prerequisite: 
CM-451 or equivalent. Consent of Instructor Re- 
quired. 
Anderson W 6:30-9:30 p.m. Winter 

LSTC M-436 

Alcoholism and Drug Abuse 

This course will deal with the dynamics of chemical 
dependency and drug addiction from a 
developmental and pastoral perspective, including 
consideration of etiology, symptomatology, in- 
tervention and after care. Theological, sociological 
and psychological implications will be addressed. 
Swanson TF 1-2:15 Win ter 

LSTC M-439 

Marriage and Family Enrichment 

Consideration of the theological, psychological, 
and sociological issues in marriage and family liv- 
ing, followed by an examination of dynamics and 
techniques relevant to various enrichment models. 
The course concludes with a marriage enrichment 
and training workshop for class members and 
spouses. (Prereq: LSTC M-320 or equiv.) 
Bauermeister T 7-10 p.m. Winter 



50 



Liturgy and Worship 



Pastoral Studies 



LSTC M-503 

Stress and Crisis Intervention for the Pastor 

Following a survey of crisis theory, the major types 
of crises confronting the parish clergy as they do 
pastoral care and the intervention techniques they 
require are examined by means o{ lectures, 
readings, and role training. (Prereq: LSTC M-320 
or equiv.) 
Bauermeister ¥8-12:15 Winter 

LSTC M-520 

Group Dynamics and Group Therapy 

Emphasis upon the learning and therapeutic ex- 
perience amidst the dynamic interactions and in- 
terpersonal relations of an ongoing group situation. 
Psychological and theological reflection as well as 
consideration of small group communication 
theory. Limited to M.Div. seniors and D.Min. 
students. 
Sivanson MW 8-9:50 Winter 

LSTC M-622 B and E 

Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling 

Supervised clinical work in marriage and family 
therapy in the Marriage and Family Therapy 
Center in Palos Park. Therapy with individuals, 
couples, families, together with theoretical input 
and staff evaluation sessions and case review. 
Limited to D. Min. in P.C.C. students. 
Swanson TBA Winter 

MTSM-310 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

The purpose of this course is to lead the student 
toward a basic understanding of the meaning and 
practice of pastoral care. The course will focus on 
the various models and styles of pastoral care that 
have existed historically and are active in the 
Church today. The course is designed to help the 
student acquire the basic skills necessary for the 
practice of pastoral care in such settings as field 
education, clinical pastoral education, advanced 
courses with experiential components, internships, 
and the pastoral ministry itself. 
Aihhy M 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 

NBTS M.395 

Fundamentals of Pastoral Care and Counseling 

This course will examine the philosophical, 
biblical, sociological and psychological bases for 
counseliAg. Subjects such as characteristics of a 
good counselor, knowledge of clients and basic 
types of counseling will be discussed. Basic skills for 
counseling will be emphasized. The course com- 
bines theory and practice in pastoral counseling. 
Taylor T 2-4:40 Winter 



NBTS M-396 

Introduction to Psychotherapy 

This class is designed for students who will make 
psychotherapeutic counseling a major facet of their 
ministry. Topics will include: forming the alliance, 
assessment and diagnosis, problem solving, em- 
pathic listening, transference phenomena, crisis in- 
tervention, mourning and termination. Case ex- 
amples, process recordings and in-class exercises 
will illustrate the theoretical material. 
Tyson T 7-9:40 Winter 

NBTS M-494 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

This is a course designed to provide pastors, profes- 
sionals and para-professionals with information 
concerning premarital, marital and family counsel- 
ing. Considerable time will be spent on the major 
areas of marriage relationships and the problems 
that arise within these areas. Divorce will be con- 
sidered from biblical, psychological and 
sociological perspectives. Prerequisite: Fundamen- 
tals of Pastoral Care and Counseling or another in- 
troductory course. 
Taylor TTh 8-9:20 Winter 

III. LITURGY & WORSHIP 
STUDIES 

CTU M'437 

Liturgical Renewal in the Hispanic Context 

In this course we will investigate the existing 

Hispanic models of liturgy. We will invite speakers 

to explain to us effective models for Hispanic 

ministry. 

Guerrero /Perez M 3-5:30 p.m. Winter 



CTU T.450 

Theology of the Eucharist 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Ostdiek MW 10:30-11:45 

Keifer TTh 10:30-11:45 



CTU T-455 
Initiation 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Keifer TTh 12-1:15 

Hughes MW 10:30-11:45 



Fall 
Winter 



Fall 
Winter 



CTUT-551 

The Liturgy of the Hours 

A seminar course which will examine the historical 
development of the Liturgy of the Hours from early 
Christian patterns of prayer through the reforms of 
Vatican II. Pastoral adaptation of the Hours as well 



51 



Liturgy and Worship 



Preaching and Communication 



as other contemporary forms of communal prayer 
will be among the topics proposed for student 
research and discussion. 
Keifer T 1:30-4 Winter 

CTU T-552 
Language of Prayer 

This seminar will explore the way in which 
liturgical language functions in Christian worship. 
Students will examine the structure, style and con- 
tent of various genres of prayer with particular at- 
tention to contemporary liturgical texts. Re- 
quirements include reading, critical analysis of a 
select number of texts and the composition of new 
texts. 
Hughes M 3-5:30 Winter 

CTU M.486, 487, 488 

Advanced Ministry Practicum: Worship 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Keifer TBA Fall 486 /Winter 487/ 

Spring 488 

CTUM-517 
Reconciliation Practicum 

This practicum includes seminar briefings and lab 
sessions designed to help the student integrate the 
theological, interpersonal, moral, canonical, and 
liturgical dimensions of the ministry of reconcilia- 
tion and move toward competency in this ministry. 
Open to 3rd and 4th year students. Audio-visual 
fee. 

Faso T 7-9:30 p.m. Winter 

Faso T 1 :30-4 Spring 

CTU M-518 
Worship Practicum 

This practicum includes seminar briefings and a 
series of lab sessions and is designed to help the 
candidate for ordination to the priesthood develop 
a celebration style for sacramental worship, 
especially Eucharist. Audio-visual fee. 
TBA T 1:30-4 Winter 

TBA T 7-9:30 p.m. Spring 

CTSCM-314 

The Worshipping Congregation 

The meaning and practice of worship in the life of a 
congregation, with special attention to the pastoral 
dimension of worship and the role of the worship 
leader. The liturgical year will provide the basic 
structure, but the study will include marriage, 
funeral and occasional services. 
DowEdgerton MW 9:30-10:50 Winter 



LSTC M-380 

Ministry in Worship (Teaching Parish) 

Introduction to liturgical methodology, historical 
overview of Christian worship, study of liturgical 
and hymnological materials in the Lutheran 
church, worship practices in the parish, and 
ministerial style. Practice in worship planning, 
coordination, and leadership. 

Bangert TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 

Rochelle TTh 11-12:15 Winter 

NBTS M-388 

Introduction to Christian Worship 

This course is a middler seminar-practicum design- 
ed as an ecumenical study of the history, theology 
and practice of worship in the church emphasizing 
the ecclesiological dynamics of the evangelical 
tradition and enabling students to be effective 
liturgical planners and leaders. 
Wilson WF 8-9:20 Winter 

IV. PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

BTS M-476 

Practicum in Biblical Preaching 

A workshop approach to exegetical skill as it leads 
to communication, the writing of sermons, and the 
delivery of sermons. The student will have the op- 
portunity to test several styles of homiletic method. 
Snyder/Faus WF 10:40-12 Winter 

CTU M-449 

Communication Skills for Public Ministry 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

TBA TBA Fall 

Baumer W 3-5:30 Winter 

CTU M-450 

The Homily in the Sunday Assembly 

(For course description, see Fall.) 



Hughes 



Fall 



Baumt 



Baumer 



AB Seminar M 9-10:15 

A Lab W 8:15-10:15 

B Lab W 3-5 p.m. 

AB Seminar W 9-10:15 

A Lab F 8:15-10:15 

B Lab F 10:30-12:30 

AB Seminar W 9-10:1 5 

A Lab F 8:15-10:15 

B Lab F 10:30-12:30 
CTU T-558 

Research Seminar in Preaching 
Students bring to this seminar their own research 
interests which are promoted and developed 
through guided readings and discussion in order to 



Wint 



Spring 



52 



Educational Ministry/ Canon Law 



Preaching and Communication 



elaborate in seminar sessions a theology of pro- 
clamation. For example, students research inter- 
cultural preaching, history of preaching, mass 
media, hermeneutics, the Holy Spirit and 
preaching, among other topics. 
Henau M 7-9:30 p.m. Winter 

LSTC M-340 

Ministry in Preaching (Teaching Parish) 

An introductory consideration of the nature of 
preaching and of essentials of sermon production: 
how to evaluate the message, achieve unity, plan 
the strategy, develop the ideas, use language. For- 
mat includes lectures, readings and discussion, and 
writing and preaching sermons. 
Deppe/hJiedenthal Th 8:30-9:45 and Winter 

discussion sections TBA 

MTSM-431 

Preaching and the Imagination 

Releasing the imagination through encounters with 
the arts to sharpen the ear to hear new dimensions 
of Scripture, to sharpen the eye to see sermons 
through key images, to sharpen the taste for sen- 
sory language, to sharpen the sense of self in ser- 
mon preparation and delivery. Prerequisite: In- 
troductory course in Preaching. 
Wardlawetal. W 2-5 Winter 

NBTS M-391 

The Church and Preaching 

This introductory course is a middler seminar- 
practicum focused on preaching as the interpreta- 
tion and communication of God's Word to God's 
People. It presents the theoretical, theological and 
methodological framework for homiletical 
discipline and provides a supervised laboratory ex- 
perience in which student-preachers develop their 
ability to prepare and deliver sermons. Prere- 
quisite: M-390 Communicating in Pastoral Con- 
texts. 
Wilson WF 10:40-12 Winter 



V. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

CTU M-463 

Holistic Parish Education 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Lucinio Th 10:30-1 



(For course description, see Fall.) 



Luci 



TBA 



Fall 480 /Winter 481 
Spring 482 



Lucinio 



Th 10:30-1 



Fall 
Winter 



CTU M-480, 481, 482 
Advanced Ministry Practicum: 
Religious Education 



CTS CM-322 
Ministry with Youth 

Offering six distinct models, this course will em- 
phasize youth peer ministry. Leadership styles, get- 
ting in touch with one's own adolescence, reading 
novels, designing a developmentally based retreat, 
and considering covenantal discipline and symbol- 
making will be key to this course. Discussions with 
city and suburban youth will highlight the course. 
Myers T 2-5 Winter 

NBTS M-383 

Teaching Methods and Practice 

This course is a practicum for planning, executing, 
and evaluating teaching/learning situations for 
team ministry in an educational context and for ex- 
perimenting with a variety of teaching styles and 
techniques. Video-taping of on-site teaching for 
purposes of evaluation and personal goal setting is 
utilized. 
Morris M 9:30-12:10 Winter 

NBTS M-484 
Ministry With Youth 

This course aims to develop the student's ministry 
skills with youth including: teaching, prayer, com- 
munion, advocacy and trouble making. Three set- 
tings are used for leadership development in- 
cluding: (1) interviews with high school student; (2) 
a weekend retreat; and (3) seminar leadership on a 
selected topic. Church and community approaches 
to youth will be considered. 
Amidon M 7-9:40 p.m. Winter 



VL CANON LAW 
CTU M-421 
Church and Structure 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Huels MW 1.30-2:45 Fall 

Huels MW 12-1:15 Winter 

CTU M-422 

Legal Aspects of the Sacraments 

A survey and practical application of Church 
legislation regarding the administration and recep- 
tion of the sacraments. Particular emphasis on 
matrimonial law and practice. 
Huels MW 3-4:15 Winter 

Huels TTh 1 0:30- 11:45 Spring 



53 



Old Testament 



SPRING 1985 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

OLD AND NEW TESTAMENT 

L GENERAL 

OLD TESTAMENT 
L INTRODUCTORY 

LSTC B-312 

Old Testament Studies III 

A survey course covering the biblical books other 

than the Pentateuch and the Prophets, the In- 

tertestamental literature, Old Testament 

hermeneutics, and a brief introduction to the 

Talmud. 

Fuerst MW2:30'3:45 Spring 

Michel MWF 9-9:50 Spring 

LSTCB-312H 

Estudios en el Antiguo Testamento III 

(Old Testament III in Spanish) 

Un curso que se trata con los libros del Antiguo 

Testamento fuera del Pentateuco y los profetas. 

Esta dado el enfasis en los Salmos y la literatura de 

sapiencia. 

Fuerst MWF 11-1 1:50 Spring 



IL CANONICAL CORPUS 

BTS B-420 

Job and Proverbs 

This course will begin with a study of wisdom 
theology. The class will then turn to focus on the 
biblical text of Proverbs and Job. As there is time 
the class will look at some modern interpretations 
of Job. 
Roop W 2:30-5:15 Spring 

CTU B-405 
Prophets and Priests 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Bergant TTh 1 0:30-1 1 :45 Fall 

Hoppe M 3-5; 7-8:45 p.m. 4/1 - 5/15 Spring 

CTU B-420 
Psalms 

Select psalms will be studied from each literary or 
liturgical category for an analysis of their language, 
form and theology. Their lasting worth to Israel, to 
the New Testament Church and to us will be ex- 
plored. Helpful for students of liturgy and 
spirituality or for a review of Old Testament 
Religion. 
Stuhlmueller TTh 9-10:15 Spring 



CTU B-425 
Wisdom Literature 

Primary focus will be on such perennial themes as 
creation, suffering, birth and death, retribution 
and immortality. Wisdom theology with its em- 
phasis on human behavior will be compared with 
other theologies found within Ancient Israel's 
tradition. 
Bergant MW 9-10:15 Spring 

CTS CH.302 

People & Faith of Israel II 

Research in Biblical hermeneutics. The more our 
tools for exegesis are refined and the harder, 
paradoxically, becomes the fundamental problem 
of communication between the Bible of old and the 
generation of today. What does it mean to read a 
text? What are the warrents that we actually read 
from it and not into it? What is a correct interpreta- 
tion? What authority, what relevance has the 
Biblical Text? Is the Word of God exclusively in the 
Bible, or uniquely there? These questions and 
others are dealt with in this course with the hope of 
finding the bedrock on which exegesis can con- 
fidently build our understanding of the message. 
LaCocque MW 11-12:20 Spring 

LSTCB-511 
Genesis 1-11 

A study of Genesis 1-11, the purpose and function 
of these narratives in the Bible, and their relation- 
ship to other Ancient Near Eastern literature. 
Michel T 2:30-5 Spring 

MTS B-415 
Jeremiah 

An exegetical and theological inquiry into the 
book of the Judean agonizing prophet of Jerusalem, 
626-582 B.C. Knowledge of Hebrew will be useful 
but is not required. 
Campbell MW 2-3:50 Spring 

NBTS B-422 

Post Exilic Prophets 

This course consists of an intensive study of Third 
Isaiah, Haggai, Zechariah, Joel, Jonah and Malachi 
and their role in the post exilic period. 
Klem T 2-4:40 Spring 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 

BTS B-325 

Old Testament Theology 

The class will explore the various approaches of do- 



54 



New Testament 



Old Testament 



ing a theology of the Old Testament. The special 
emphasis will be on kerygmatic theology. The 
course will conclude by discussing the relationship 
between the Old Testament and the New Testa- 
ment and the unity of the Old Testament. 
Roop TTh 11-12:20 Spring 

CTU B-475 

History and Archaeology of Israel 

This course will be direct preparation for the three 
week on site visit to Israel. Participants will be 
familiarized with the stages of the religious, cultural 
and political history of Israel; the geographical con- 
text of Israel and the Bible; the history and 
methodology of biblical archaeology. 
Hoppe/Karris T 3'5;7'8:45 p.m., 4/1 - 5/15 Spring 

CTS CH-425 

Worship in Ancient Israel 

(A Selection of Psalms) 

The all important theme of the Zion ideology will 
serve as a leading thread through the Psalter. 
Hopefully a faithful image of the Temple mystique 
will emerge which will be contrasted with its op- 
position in the Northern Kingdom, and, during 
the Second Temple period, in the Hassidic milieux 
(Hassidic Psalms in context). 
LaCocque T 2-5 Spring 

LSTC B-615 
Post-Exilic Prophets 

An intensive study of Third Isaiah, Haggai, 
Zechariah, Joel, Jonah, and Malachi and their role 
in the Post-Exilic Period. (For post-M.Div. 
students. Admission by others by permission of in- 
structor.) 
Klein MW 1-2:15 Spring 



IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

BTS/NBTS B-312 
Biblical Aramaic 

This introductory overview intends in one quarter 
to teach the rudiments of Aramaic grammar and 
syntax inductively from the Masoretic text of Ezra 
and Daniel so that the student can recognize 
characteristic Aramaic patterns of morphology and 
syntax. This course is offered jointly by BTS and 
NBTS. 
Nasgowitz TWF 1-1:50 Spring 

LSTC B.301 
Hebrew II 

Continuation of Hebrew I and completion of in- 



troduction to the basic elements of Hebrew gram- 
mar. Readings from selected portions of Genesis. 
(Prereq: LSTC B-300 or equiv.) 
Klein MWF 8-8:50 Spring 

MTS B-32 1/322 

Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis, I, II 

(For course description, see Winter.) 
Welbom MTWTh 9-9:50 Winter 

Campbell Sec. 1: MTWTh 9-9:50 Spring 

Sec. 2: TF 2-3:50 Spring 



NEW TESTAMENT 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

BTS B-330 

Introduction to the New Testament 

This course is designed to give the student an in- 
troduction to the life, times, and message of the 
New Testament as the basis for further study and 
use. The total range of backgrounds, context, text, 
canon, history of interpretation and translation of 
the New Testament will come under study. 
Homing WF 10:40-12 Spring 

LSTC B-332 
Pauline Tradition 

A study of the composition and content of the gen- 
uine Pauline epistles as well as the deuteropauline 
writings, placing them within their historical set- 
ting. Basic theological and ethical themes o{ Paul 
will be investigated. 

F. Danker MW 11-12:15 Spring 

Linss MWF 9-9:50 Spring 

MTSB.313 
Paul 

Introduction to the generative insights of Paul, his 
letters and the historical contexts of the letters. 
Welbom MW 10-11:50 Spring 

NBTSB-431H 

New Testament: A Third World Reading 

This introductory course, taught in Spanish, will 
give students a basic understanding of the composi- 
tion, content and message of the New Testament 
from a Third World perspective, including 
methodological considerations and the history of 
Biblical interpretation with special reference to the 
hermeneutical problem in "theologizing from the 
underside of history." Prerequisite: Two previous 
New Testament courses or permission of the pro- 
fessor. 
Weiss F 8-9:20, 10:40-12 Spring 



55 



New Testament 



II. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B-439 
Gospel of Matthew 

An exegetical study of Matthew's use of the Jesus 
tradition to inform the life of the church as the 
Messianic community, with special attention to the 
struggle between church and synagogue after A.D. 

70. 

Gardner T 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

CTU B-432 

The Gospel According to Mark 

An analysis of the entire Gospel of Mark with at- 
tention to its structure, major themes and key 
theological motifs. Particular emphasis will be 
given to the evangelist's insistence on the link bet- 
ween the Passion of Jesus and Christian 
discipleship. 
Senior TTh J0:30-JJ:45 Spring 

CTU B-440 

The Gospel According to John 

(For course description, see Fall). 

Senior 7 7-9:30 p.m. Fall 

Karris W 3-5; 7-8:45 p.m., 4/1 - 5/15 Spring 

CTS CH-521 

Exegetical Seminar: The Gospel of Luke 

Exegesis of a significant document of the New 
Testament. The text in 1985 is the Gospel of Luke. 
Prerequisite: CTS CH-321 or equivalent. 

Scroggs TTh 11-12:20 Spring 

LSTC B-551 
Hebrews 

The Epistle to the Hebrews. An exegetical ap- 
proach concentrating on the structure, thought 
pattern, Christology, parenesis, and unique con- 
tribution of the tract or sermon. Topics covered 
will include the relation to Hellenistic Judiasm; 
Greek thought; early Alexandrian Christianity; 
use of prior traditions. (Prereq: LSTC B-332 or 
equiv.) 
Krentz TF 1-2:15 Spring 

LSTC B-626 

Exegesis of the Pastoral Epistles 

A study of the epistles to Timothy and Titus, based 
on the Greek text, with particular attention to the 
problems of authorship and historical setting. (For 
post-M.Div. students. Admission of others by per- 
mission of instructor.) 
Linss MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 



NBTS B-439 

The Revelation of John 

A survey and interpretation of one of the most 
challenging and controversial books of the New 
Testament. The approach will include an attempt 
to read the text from the context of the first cen- 
tury church. Emphasis will be placed on its message 
in context and its significance for the Church to- 
day. Prerequisites: B-331 Synoptic Gospels, B-332 
Pauline Epistles. 
TBA WF 1-2:20 Spring 

NBTS B-334H 
The Gospel of John 

This course, taught in Spanish, explores the text of 
the gospel in order to elucidate the literary, 
theological and historical context in which this 
gospel came into being. The aim is to understand 
both the text before us and the Christians who 
gave it to us. 
Weiss 



Th 6-8:40 p.m. 



Spring 



NBTS B-332 
Pauline Epistles 

This course introduces the background and life of 
Paul as well as the history of Pauline interpretation. 
It includes the interpretation of Paul's thought as 
found in his major epistles. 
TBA WF 10:40-12 Spring 



III. SELECT TOPICS IN 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B-419 

Augustine and the Birth of 

Western Christianity 

This course seeks to understand how the com- 
ponents of Augustine's life and worlds, visible in 
his writings and ministry, are variously received, 
interpreted, and remembered by Christian com- 
munities, both historically and today. Particular at- 
tention will be given to Augustine's political- 
cultural and socio-religious involvements as well as 
to his interpersonal commitments. 
Meyer TTh 8-9:20 Spring 

BTS B-438 

Biblical Seminar: 

Parables and the Language of Faith 

This course is concerned with our use of language 
itself as faithful or idolatrous. Parables will be ex- 
amined as to how persons discern and properly 
communicate truth signified by, but not contained 
in, words of faith. 
Meyer WF 8-9:20 Spring 



56 



Historical Studies 



New Testament 



CTU B-492 

Sickness, Disability and Healing 

in Biblical Perspective 

Old and New Testament traditions about sickness, 
disability and healing will be examined as a means 
of reflecting on contemporary attitudes to these 
questions. Lectures on the biblical materials will be 
augmented by input from other resources such as 
theology, law, medicine, pastoral care and the ex- 
perience o{ persons with disabilities. 
Stuhlmueller/ Senior T 7-9:30 p.m. Spring 

CTU B-561 

Liberation Theology and 

'The Kingdom of God' 

Exegetes north and south of the equator concur in 
their judgment that the quintessential teaching of 
Jesus, both in word and work, had reference to 'the 
kingdom of God/heaven.' What liberation 
theologians understand by that phrase, however, 
may conflict with the meaning(s) traditionally given 
it in nonliberationist circles. We will examine both 
sides of the story and draw our own tentative con- 
clusions. 
Reynolds T 1:30'4 Spring 



CTS CH-423 

Theology of Paul as a Cultural Critique 

An interpretation of Paul as a counter-culture 
theologian. Models will be used from sociological 
and psychoanalytic theory as aids in interpreting 
his language and thought for contemporary per- 
sons. 
Scroggs MW 9:30' 10:50 Spring 

LSTC B-582 

St. Paul's Vision of a New Church 

Exploration of St. Paul's teaching on the person 
and function of Jesus Christ in relation to the mis- 
sion and message of the People of God. 
F. Danker M 7'lOp.m. Spring 

MTS B-413 

New Testament Tensions in 

Contemporary Settings 

The New Testament and other early Christian 
writings reflect a variety of tensions which arose 
within the Christian communities in the course of 
their development from an initially charismatically 
led movement into organized, institutionalized 
churches. Using insights from sociology and other 
contemporary social sciences, we shall seek to 
relate these early organizing experiences to the ten- 



sions, crises and challenges faced by leadership of 

Christian congregations today. 

Dudley /Hilgert MW 10-11:50 Spring 

NBTS B-330 

Interpreting the New Testament 

The course is designed to introduce the student to 
the methods, tools and hermeneutical principles 
for doing exegetical work and evaluating the work 
of others in the New Testament. At the same time 
the course should serve as a general introduction to 
New Testament studies. 
Scholer JTh 8-9:20 Spring 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

BTS B-413 

Greek Exegesis: Pastoral Epistles 

A study of the pastoral epistles (Timothy, Titus) ac- 
cording to the Greek text. Prerequisite: Elements of 
New Testament Greek or equivalent. 
Homing MW 1-2:20 Spring 

LSTC B-339 
Greek Readings 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Wegener TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 

Wegener MWF 8-8:50 Fall 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 
L INTRODUCTORY 

BTS H-349 

Research Methods in Church History 

Practical training in research techniques and 
sharpening of the critical spirit through guidance 
on individual projects. 
Durnbaugh W 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

CTU H-307 

The Christianization of Europe 

A study of the Church's encounter with the Bar- 
barian nations, of their conversion and of the 
development of Christian life. Major consideration 
will be given to: Medieval Missions; Charlemagne; 
the Papal States; the Schism between East and 
West; and the development and experience of a 
Christian European Culture. 
TBA TBA Spring 



57 



Historical Studies 



CTU H-312 

From Baroque Catholicism to Vatican 11 

A study is made of the major trends in the Catholic 
Church from its post-Tridentine phase to the 
movements operative in Vatican II, i.e. from 
Jansenism, through Ultramontanism and Modern- 
ism, to the Church's confrontation with 20th cen- 
tury political and intellectual trends. Examinations 
and project required. 
}^emer M W 1 0:30- 11:45 Spring 

CTS CH-380 

History of Religion in American Society 

An introduction to the historical study of 
American religion, with emphasis on these topics: 
the churches' visions of a "Christian America" from 
the Puritans to the present; civil religion and the 
rituals and myths of public life; the religious bases 
of some reform movements. Attention to dissen- 
ting voices. 
Bass T 6:30-9:30 p.m. Spring 

LSTC H-310A 

Ancient and Medieval Church History 

The developing life and thought of the Christian 
church, presented in broad perspective. Lectures 
and group discussions of selected source readings. 
Hendel MWF 9-9:50 Spring 

LSTC H-310B 

Studies in Ancient and Medieval 

Church History 

An introduction to these periods through a con- 
centration on a few major events and leaders, e.g. 
the Councils of Nicaea and Chalcedon, Augustine, 
and Aquinas. Seminar method. (An alternative to 
LSTCH-310A.) 
Tobias TTh 11-12:15 Spring 

NETS C-341 

Early and Medieval Christianity 

The course is an examination of issues and 
developments in Christian life and thought from 
the beginning of the second century to the time of 
the Reformation. Regular and intensive reading, 
both in primary and secondary sources, is em- 
phasized as a basis for meaningful classroom discus- 
sion. 
Webber Th 2:30-5:10 Spring 



II. HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 
TRADITIONS 

BTS H-343 

History of the Church of the Brethren 

Analaysis of the development of the Church of the 
Brethren from its sectarian beginnings in 
eighteenth-century Europe to its denominational 
position in twentieth-century America, with par- 
ticular attention to its relationships with other 
Christian movements and its cultural environ- 
ment. 
Durnbaugh WF 8-9:20 Spring 

CTS CH-367 

History and Polity of the 

United Church of Christ 

A study of the history, structure, theology, and 
practices of the United Church of Christ, in- 
cluding its antecedents: the Congregational Chris- 
tian Churches and the Evangelical and Reformed 
Church. This course earns one credit and satisfies 
current UCC requirements for ordination. 
Staff TBA Spring 

LSTC H-360 

The Lutheran Heritage 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Pero MW 1-2:15 Spring 

Scherer MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

LSTC H-533 

The Debate on Justification 

A study of the role of the doctrine in the 16th cen- 
tury debates over the nature of the Christian faith 
and the Christian community, with attention to 
Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Reformed, and Left 
Wing views as well as reassessment in 20th century 
biblical and ecumenical thought. 
Fischer TF 1-2:15 Spring 

MIL H-532 

Seminar: The Radical Reformation 

A study of the Anabaptist, Spiritualist, and 
Evangelical Rationalist movements with respect to 
their influences on contemporary Christian 
churches. Each student will prepare and present a 
paper on the theological influence of a leader or of 
a major issue in the Radical Reformation. 
Godbey TBA Spring 



M/L H-534 

Seminar: Liberal Thinkers in History 

A comparative study of the thought, the religious 
contexts, and subsequent systematic interpreta- 



58 



Theological Studies 



Historical Studies 



tions of major religious thinkers who have influenc- 
ed the development of religious liberalism. The 
course will provide an opportunity for the student 
to develop his or her own constructive liberal 
religious philosophy on the basis of previous in- 
troductory work. 
Godbey TBA Spring 



IIL HISTORY - INDIVIDUALS 

LSTCH-611 

Luther on Church and Ministry 

A graduate seminar studying Luther's views on the 
nature of the church and its ministry in the 
original sources and with reference to pertinent 
secondary literature. (For post-M.Div. students; 
admission of others by consent of instructor). 
Fischer MW 1'2:15 Spring 



IV. AMERICAN CHURCH 
HISTORY 

MTS H-406 

The American Presbyterian and 

Reformed Churches 

A historical survey of the major Presbyterian and 
Reformed bodies in America, with special atten- 
tion to the institutional and theological history of 
the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). 
Schafer W 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

V. SELECT TOPICS 
IN CHURCH HISTORY 

CTU H-425 

The Growth of the Church in Africa 

This course will examine the growth of Christiani- 
ty in Africa through the agency of various churches 
and mission societies in the 19th and 20th cen- 
turies. The student chooses a particular country or 
church or missionary society for an indepth study. 
Nemer TTh 1 0:30- 1 1 :45 Spring 

CTS CH-592 

Peace and War in Christian History 

A seminar on Christian attitudes and practices 

with regard to war and peace, with emphasis on 

sources from the Reformation to the present. 

Special attention to the historical significance of 

pacifism. 

Bass MW 11-12:20 Spring 



LSTC H-521 

The Late Medieval Church 

An analysis of the forces which influenced and 
characterized the history of the Western Church at 
the close of the Middle Ages, with particular atten- 
tion to such topics as conciliarism, the Avignon 
Papacy, the Renaissance Papacy, humanism, and 
popular religion. (Prereq: LSTC H-310 or equiv.) 
Mendel TF 1-2:15 Spring 

MTS H-4H 
Medieval Christianity 

A survey of intellectual, political, cultural, and 

spiritual developments during the Middle Ages, 

with emphasis on the two centuries leading into the 

Reformation. 

Barker T 1 -4 Spring 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY AND 

FOUNDATIONAL 

BTST-351 

Christian Faith and Thought 

A study of Christian faith and thought in its 
historical development. Following a brief overview 
of the church's interaction with cultural understand- 
ings through the earlier years, primary attention 
is given to the impact of the Enlightenment and 
some major types of contemporary response. 
Groff/Frantz TTh 8-9:20 Spring 

LSTCT.313 
Christian Theology HI 

For description of the Christian Theology se- 
quence, see LSTC Christian Theology I. The third 
course in the sequence deals with the Holy Spirit, 
the Church, the Means of Grace, the Christian 
Life, and Eschatology. 

Braaten MWF 11-11:50 Spring 

Hefner TTh 11-12:15 Spring 

NETS C-350 
Philosophy of Religion 

This course, understood as preliminary to 
systematic theology, is an examination of the 
reasonableness of belief in God, the occurrence of 
evil, the possibility of miracles, the nature of 
religious language and the relationship of faith to 
reason. The course is recommended for students 
who have not had at least one course in 
philosophy. 
TBA M 7-9:40 p.m. Spring 



59 



Theological Studies 



NETS C-355 

Christian Theology 111: 

Christian Life, Community and God 

This course is a continuation of C-354 exploring 
anthropology, justification and sanctification, and 
ecclesiology. Finally, the nature of God (as Person 
and Trinity) is elucidated by drawing together the 
material of both courses regarding God's revelation 
and historical activity. Prerequisite: C'354 Chris- 
tian Theology II or permission of the instructor. 
Finger TTh 11-12:20 Spring 



NETS C-555 

Doctrine of Reconciliation in the 

Theology of Karl Earth 

This seminar will consist of a close reading of one 
or two volumes of the Church Dogmatics. 
Volumes and precise topics will vary from year to 
year, but themes of Christology and the doctrine of 
reconciliation will be a special and recurring 
theme. Prerequisites: basic theology sequence or 
permission of the instructor. 
Dayton T 7-9:40 p.m. Spring 



II. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

CTU T-524 

Nineteenth Century Catholic Theology 

A study of major themes in the Catholic Tubingen 

School of the Early 19th Century. 

Hayes MW 3-4:15 Spring 

MTS T-436 

Karl Marx and Christian Theology 

This course is designed to familiarize the student 
with the basic work and concepts of Karl Marx. 
Particular attention will be given to his concepts on 
alienation, social change, historical materialism, 
ideology, and his understanding of the nature and 
meaning of religion as well as the influence of Marx 
in Latin American Theology of Liberation. The 
course will begin approximately April 22, 1985. 
Garcia TBA Spring 

MIL M-422 

Literature for Liberal Religion 

An introductory to post-Biblical, principally 
Western, texts which may be considered can- 
didates for a "classical literature" for liberal religion. 
Engel TBA Spring 

M/L TS-597 

Theological Assessment Seminar 

The purpose of the seminar will be to create clear 
and concise statements of each participant's posi- 
tion on a variety of theological topics, assess the 
sources of these positions, and project future study. 
Emphasis on the coherence and adequacy of in- 
dividual student's theological reflections. For 
senior students only. 
Reeves TBA Spring 



IIL SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 

BTS T-447 
Expressions of Pietism 

Appropriating recent translations of 



primary 



sources, the seminar wi 
and legacies of Pietism. 
Brown W 2:30-5:15 



examine sources, motifs. 
Spring 



CTU T-435 

Origins and Eschatology 

A study of the Christian symbols concerning the 
origins of human life, the world and evil; a cor- 
relative investigation of finality and eschatological 
symbolism. 
Hayes M W 1 0:30- 1 1 :45 Spring 

CTU T-436 

Origins and Ends in Mythic Consciousness 

An exploration of the symbolization process o( 
origins, the problem of evil, death and the collec- 
tive endtime in Christian and other selected 
religious traditions. 
Schreiter TTh 9-10:1 5 Spring 

CTU T-446 

The Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

In the light of the contemporary questioning of 
"the missions" this course will try to determine why 
the Church by her very nature must be missionary, 
what this mission means, how "necessary" it is in 
the plan of salvation, and how it is to be carried out 
in our modern, post-colonial world. 
Burrows MW 12-1:15 Spring 

CTU T-449 

Elack, Chicano, and Latin American 

Liberation Theologies: A Comparative 

Analysis 

By comparison and contrast, students will in- 
vestigate three major forms of liberation theology. 



60 



Theological Studies 



Special attention will be given to the global con- 
tribution to theology growing out of the Black, 
Chicano, and Puerto Rican experiences. 

Guerrero MW 1:30-2 A 5 Spring 

CTS TEC-346 

Theological Images in Black Literature 

An inquiry into the theology of the Black religious 
experience through the identification and analysis 
of the theological images, concepts and symbols 
communicated in Black literature. 
Cummings T6:30'9;30 spring 

CTS TEC-408 
Christology 

"Who is Jesus Christ for us today?" will be the cen- 
tral concern of this study. This question will be ex- 
amined in the light of the christology of the New 
Testament, Nicaea and Chalcedon and contem- 
porary perspectives on Jesus Christ. A constructive 
statement will be attempted. 
Cummings M 6:30-9:30 Spring 

CTS TEC-415 

Latin American Theologies of Liberation: 

A North American Response 

It is now clear that the major force in Christian 
Theology in the last decade has been the explosive 
emergency of liberation theologies. From Latin 
America, Africa and Asia, liberation theologies 
challenge North American Christian thought and 
life style. As North Americans, it is crucial that we 
respond to these challenges by examining in depth 
our own context and its options for liberation. 
Thistlethuiaite TW 2-3:20 Spring 

CTS TEC-498 

Theology of Marriage and the Family 

After a review of traditional interpretations of mar- 
riage and the family the focus will be on the 
development of a constructive theological stance in 
dialogue with contemporary understandings of the 
changing patterns of marriage and the family, the 
family as a system, and family development 
through the life-span. 
LeFevre W 6:30-9:30 Sprmg 

CTS TEC'565 

Seminar: Whitehead &. Depth Psychology 

Selected concepts derived from contemporary 
Freudian and Jungian psychoanalysis will be 
analyzed from the perspective of Whitehead's 
philosophy. Consent of instructor required. 
Moore /Schroeder WIS Spring 



LSTC T-430 

Black Theology and the Black Church 

An analytical survey of the Black experience in the 
United States, theologically correlated with 
historical, psychological, and sociological factors. 
Special attention to the critical construction of a 
coherent expression of the Christian reality so that 
it redemptively engages the world of cultures. 
Pero TF 1-2:15 Spring 

LSTC T-454 

Ministerial Identity and Apostolic Continuity 

Research and discussion on the contemporary pro- 
blem of ministerial identity, the meaning of ordina- 
tion, the relation of "Ministry of Word and Sacra- 
ment" and "Historic Episcopacy" to apostolic con- 
tinuity. 
Tobias W 7-10 p.m. Spring 

LSTC T-529 

Beginnings of the Dialectical Theology 

(1918-1930) 

This course will include lectures and seminar 
reports. The first sessions will deal with the 19th 
century background. Students will examine texts 
by Karl Barth, especially the Commentary on 
Romans, and a selection of texts illustrating the 
theological development that led to Romans and 
the controversy it elicited, including readings in 
Bultmann, Gogarten, Brunner, Thurneysen, and 
others. (Limited enrollment; preference given to 
post-M.Div. students.) 
]enson TBA Spring 

LSTC T-632 

The Idea of God in the 20th Century 

A seminar exploring various approaches to the 
doctrines of God in Christian theology as 
represented by the thought of Karl Barth, Paul 
Tillich, Wolfhart Pannenberg, and Eberhard 
Jungel, within the context of the modern quest for 
God. Attention to the role of natural theology and 
the distinctively Christian definition of the identi- 
ty of God. (For post-M.Div. students. Admission of 
others by permission of instructor.) 
Braaten MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 

LSTC T-672 

Religion and Science Seminar 

This annual seminar includes both faculty and 
students and deals each year with a specific theme 
within the field of religion and science. Interested 
persons should contact Prof. Hefner for details. 
(For post-M.Div. students. Admission of others by 
consent of instructor.) 
Burhoe, Hefner T 7-10 p.m. Spring 



61 



Theological Studies 



Ethical Studies 



MTST-315 

Hispanic-American Cultural Resources 

for Theological Reflection 

Recent writings by Hispanic authors offer cultural 
resources for theological reflection. Selected 
sources will be examined for the purpose of glean- 
ing those contributions which lend themselves to 
such reflections. 
Armenddriz M 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

MTS T-409 

Church and Kingdom 

A seminar on theological issues related to the mis- 
sion of the Church in and for the world. Included 
are such topics as the relation of Christianity and 
other religions, the vision of the universal com- 
munity, and the missionary task of the Church, the 
hope for salvation, and the Kingdom of God. 
Parker F 94 1:50 Spring 

MTST-414 

Studies in Reformed Theology 

A theological exploration of the distinctive 
character of Reformed theology. Emphasis upon 
understanding "thinking within a tradition." In- 
cludes study of selected writings and confessional 
documents. Special attention to the Confession of 
1967, to determine whether it is a Reformed docu- 
ment. 
Burkhart 



T 7-9:50 p.m. 



Spring 



NBTS C-554 

Seminar in Biblical Authority 

This seminar will examine the various angles 
(biblical foundations, historical grounding, 
theological adequacy, etc.) the doctrine of biblical 
authority that was articulated in the 19th century 
"Princeton Theology" and lies behind "evangelical" 
debates surrounding the "Battle for the Bible." 
Prerequisite: Basic Theology sequence and substan- 
tive work in Biblical studies or the permission of 
the instructor. 
Dayton M 9:30-12:10 Spring 

IV. SPIRITUALTY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTU H.492 

History of Christian Spirituality: 

The Mendicant Renewal 

The rise of the Mendicant Orders in the Church 
within the context of the movements of poverty 
and the growing orientation of religious life 
towards apostolate. The new image of the church 
they propose. Tensions and stabilization in the 
conventual life. Their influence on Christian 



spirituality. A brief view on the early history of the 

different Mendicant Orders. 

Lozano TTh 9-10:15 Spring 

CTU H-495 

History of Christian Spirituality: 
American Catholic Spirituality in 
the 19th - 20th Centuries 

A study of various expressions of Catholic 
spirituality in the last two centuries of American 
Christianity, with emphases on religious com- 
munities, lay movements in the 1940's and 50's, 
countercultural protest, and charismatic renewal. 
Readings and a final paper required. 
Lozano TTh 12-1:15 p.m. Spring 

CTU M-483, 484, 485 

Advanced Ministry Practicum: Spirituality 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
McCarthy TBA Fall 483 /Winter 484/ 

Spring 485 

ETHICAL STUDIES 
L MORAL THEOLOGY 

CTU E-370 

Christian Ethics: Language of a Community 

Christian ethics describes a community's pursuit of 
a life, a sharing in which values important to that 
community are displayed and embodied. Because 
particular attention will be paid to the Roman 
Catholic tradition, this introductory course will 
consider the relationship of Christ to morality, the 
centrality of the virtues, the natural law tradition, 
and other themes important to contemporary 
Catholic morality. 
Wadell MW 10:30-11:45 Spring 

LSTCE-310 
Christian Ethics 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Sherman TF 1-2:15 Spring 

Bloomquist MW 1-2:15 Fall 

IL SOCIAL AND 
POLITICAL ETHICS 

BTS E-369 

Peace Studies Seminar 

The seminar runs continually throughout the year. 
It offers opportunity for common reading of peace- 
related materials; presentation and discussion of 
papers; sharing from peace ministries; and dialogue 
with visiting peace theologians, activists, and 
leaders. One quarter hour credit per quarter. 
Brown 73:10-4:40 Spring 



62 



Ethics Studies 



BTST-551 

Advanced Seminar: Faith and Peacemaking 

The seminar will work systematically in reference 

to theological and biblical foundations for the 

peace witness in the context of one's personal faith 

stance. Prerequisite: Theology of Pacifism; The 

Church, the State, and War; or permission of the 

instructor. 

Brown WF 10:40-12 Spring 

CTU E-374 

On Being a Christian in the World 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Fornasari MW 1:30-2:45 Fall 

Fornasan MW 9-10:15 Spring 



Wirth and Mumford will be examined in connec- 
tion with historic cities. 
Fukuyama Th 9:30-12:20 Spring 

LSTC E-433 

Social Class as a Pastoral-Theological- 
Ethical Challenge 

The problem of class in American society and in 
the church is masked as well as intensified by 
assumptions about our seeming classlessness. We 
will examine how classism operates, with a special 
focus on working-class experience, and with a con- 
sideration of how theology might be socially 
transformative of class realities. 
Bloomquist MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 



CTU E-410 

Peace and Christian Ethics 

The course will explore the question: How does the 
Church understand and actuate the relation be- 
tween its call, message and mission and the search 
for peace on the part of the human community? 
The question will be approached both historically 
and systematically. From this study, some conclu- 
sions will be drawn for the understanding of the 
scope and nature of Christian ethics. Introductory 
courses in Ethics and Church history are prere- 
quisites. 
Fornasari MW 12-1:15 Spring 

CTU E-557 

The Social Responsibility of the Church 

Crucial to understanding the Church's social 
responsibility is to recognize that the Church itself 
is a social ethic. How the Church responds to the 
dilemmas of the world depends on how the Church 
understands itself. This course will examine how 
the Church's social responsibility has been con- 
strued through such writers as Rauschenbusch, 
Niebuhr, Yoder, and others. 
Wadell MW 1:30-2:45 Spring 

CTU M-492, 493, 494 

Advanced Ministry Practicum: Social Justice 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Szura TBA Fall 492 /Winter 493/ 

Spring 494 

CTS TEC-454 

Religion and Urban Society 

Cities in history (ancient, Biblical, medieval, 
Puritan, etc.) will be the context for the study of 
major theories of religion and society. Theorists 
such as deCoulanges, Troeltsch, Pirenne, Weber, 



M/L E-397 

Democracy and Religious Social Ethics 

An overview of the historical emergence of the 
"democratic idea" in Western religious and political 
thought, with special attention to major contend- 
ing contemporary interpretations of its ethical 
meaning and legitimacy. 
Engel TBA Spring 

NETS C-485cH 

Social Ethics III: An Historical Third 

World Perspective 

This course, which is taught in Spanish, is an in- 
quiry — from the perspective of the poor - of ma- 
jor socio-ethical thinkers and movements in the 
Christian tradition from "Revum Novarum" to the 
present, giving special attention to those of con- 
testative intentionality as expressions of the subver- 
sive character of Christian faith. Prerequisites: 
C-458bH or consent of the instructor. 
Mottesi T 6-8:40 p.m. Spring 

NBTS C-357 
Church and Society 

This course considers theological presuppositions 
about the relation-tension of Christian-world and 
Church-society and analyzes the United States' 
socio-economic-political-cultural situation as a 
reality in conflict. Students engage in a contem- 
porary reading of the Bible from this perspective in 
order to develop paradigms for the Church's life 
and mission. Prerequisites: One course in Christian 
Theology or its equivalent or permission of the in- 
structor. 
Mottesi' W 2:30-5:10 Spring 



63 



Ethics Studies 



Ministry Studies /World Mission Studies 



III. SELECT TOPICS IN ETHICS 

BTS M-591 

The Sociology of the Congregation 

An examination of current sociological studies of 
the congregation, ministerial practice, and contem- 
porary belief. Students will be encouraged to 
develop their own styles of pastoral leadership. 
Miller TTh9:30'10:50 Spring 

CTU E-471 

Moral Development 

An investigation into developmental theories such 
as those o{ Erikson, Fowler, and Kohlberg, and 
their implications for ethics. Among topics discuss- 
ed will be the question of character formation, 
culture, and pluralism in ethics. 
Nairn TThl2'l:15 Spring 

CTU E-481 

Sexual Ethics for the Christian 

This offering treats sexuality and sexual behavior 
in the unmarried Christian. It intends to develop 
the kind of pastoral attitudes that will serve to 
guide Christian people, both in the development of 
attitude toward sexuality and positions toward sex- 
ual conduct, including premarital sex and 
homosexuality. 
Nairn TTh 9-10:15 Spring 



witness. Examples of contemporary Indian 

theology and obstacles to Christian mission are 

considered. 

Scherer W 7-10 p.m. Spring 

LSTC W-453 
The Mind of Islam 

Beginning with Muhammed and the Quran, the 
course will trace the development of Islamic 
thought by focusing on major figures and 
movements in its history. Included are theologians, 
saints, theorists, travellers, poets, and scholars. At- 
tention is given also to movements agitating the 
Islamic world today. 
Vogelaar T 2:30-5 Spring 

NETS M-475 
Missiology 

This course introduces the Christian global mis- 
sion and the role of the Church and the individual 
in that mission. Students examine contemporary 
missiological issues from historical, theological, 
geographical and organizational perspectives; par- 
ticipate in a two-day area mission conference; ac- 
quire resources for a responsible local church mis- 
sion strategy; and formulate a personal philosophy 
of mission. 
Bakke Th 7-9:40 p.m. Spring 



WORLD MISSION STUDIES 

CTU W.419 

Toward a Missionary Spirituality 

A seminar exploring various aspects of contem- 
porary missionary spirituality. 
Gittins W 3-5:30 Spring 

CTU W-546 
Religions and Societies 

A course looking at the role of religion within a 
variety of societies. Students will have the oppor- 
tunity to explore how religion functions in specific 
societies in which they are working. 
Gittins MW 12-1:15 Spring 

LSTC W.432 

Theology and Mission in the 

Indian Cultural Context 

The course focuses on the mission of the Christian 
community in India today with reference to 
evangelization, nation building, dialogue with peo- 
ple o( other faiths, and involvement in social 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

I. THE NATURE AND PRACTICE 

OF MINISTRY 

CTU M-380, 385, 390 
Basic Ministry Practicum 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Staff TBA Fall 380/Winter 385/ 

Spring 390 

CTS CM-442 
Sexuality 

In an atmosphere designed to demythologize sex- 
uality, the seminar examines different sexual styles, 
behavior, experience, cultural values, and over- 
reaction to sexual stimuli. Resources from theology 
and the behavioral sciences are utilized as each 
member is asked to develop a value stance about 
sexuality for our time and for ministry. 
Anderson M 2-5 Spring 



64 



Pastoral Studies 



Ministry Studies 



LSTC M-370 

Ministry in Church and Society 

(Teaching Parish) 

Aims at understanding of contemporary social in- 
terpretation, clarity on how one moves from faith 
to love to justice, and a critical perspective on how 
the church is affected by and is affecting the social 
order. Includes parish involvem.ent. 
Bloomquist/Deppe TTh 8:30'9-A5 Spring 

LSTC M'452 
Christianity and Tragedy 

A seminar which probes the relationship between a 
tragic sense of vision of life and a Christian one, 
and the bearing of this relationship on theological 
understanding and Christian proclamation. 
Readings in dramatic works of tragedy and selected 
sermons of Paul Tillich. Limited enrollment; admis- 
sion by consent of instructor. 
Niedenthal 7 2:30-5 Spring 

MTS M-430 
Partnership in Ministry 

For women and men who have had some leader- 
ship experience within a congregation (e.g., as a 
layperson or field education student). Goals of the 
course are: 1) to explore what helps and hinders 
communication between men and women, and 2) 
to consider and practice strategies for education 
and change which will help both to be more effec- 
tive in ministry. 
Allen/Coffman MW 8-9:50 Spring 

M/L M-596 

Religious Leadership Seminar 

A workshop on final preparation for settlement in 
the ministry, focusing on agenda, criteria, modes, 
and resources in liberal religious leadership. Par- 
ticipants will consider journals and reflections of 
key religious leaders, compare various models of 
leadership, share and refine their own packet 
statements, review the UUA Settlement Handbook 
and the UUMA Guidelines, and attend to impor- 
tant elements of the professional contract. 
Shacllc TBA Spring 

NETS M-672 

The Minister As Manager 

In brief, a course which seeks to integrate contem- 
porary management theory and creative pastoral 
ministry in ways that develop leadership strategies, 
styles and skills in the congregational context. 
Bakke April 8- 1 2, 1985 Spring 



IL PASTORAL CARE 

BTS M-387 
Ministry to Families 

This course involves the study of theories of family 
formation, development, and difficulties as they 
shape individual personalities within the context of 
biblical theology. Students will interview families 
for practical experience and will learn beginning 
skills in changing family structures. 
Poling TTh 11-12:20 Spring 

BTS M-584 

Case Conference 1 qhr 

This course involves weekly one-hour sessions of 

three to five students who are involved in regular 

counseling in a local church or a clinical setting. 

Three hours credit for the academic year. 

Poling TBA Spring 

CTU M-401 

Theological Topics in Freudian Thought 

A study of the origins and structure of the 
psychology of Sigmund Freud is followed by the 
identification and exploration of their theological 
implications. Primary sources will be used. 
Szura MW 12-1:15 Spring 

CTU M-405 

Introduction to Basic Pastoral Counseling 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Mallonee MW 9-10:15 Fall 

Mallonee TTh 9- 10:15 Winter 

McCarthy TTh 10:30-11:45 Spring 

CTU M-406 

Practicum in Basic Pastoral Counseling 

Continuation of M-405 with emphasis on the 
deepening of counseling skills and knowledge 
through practice tapes and review sessions. Audio- 
visual fee. 

Mallonee MW 9-10:15 Spring 

CTU M-409 

Pastoral Care to Specific Groups 

This course presents each student the opportunity 
to explore through readings, field research and 
class discussions, the particular pastoral care isues 
in ministry to specific populations. lnJi\-iJual 
learning contracts. 
Mallonee MW 1:30-2:45 Spring 



65 



Pastoral Studies 



CTU M-489, 490, 491 
Advanced Ministry Practicum: 
Community Development 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Szura TBA Fall 489/Winter 490/ 

Spring 491 

CTS CM-330 

Personal Transformation 

The basic course dealing with the nature and 
dynamics of personal transformation approached 
both experientially and theoretically. The context 
and uniqueness of pastoral care and the nature of 
the caring church community will be explored. 
CTS Priority. 
Moore MW 9:30-10:50 Spring 

CTS CM-472 

House Church Leadership Intensive 

Experiencing, theological reflection, and skills 
training go hand in hand in this course, which 
utilizes and adapts the insights of Gestalt, 
Psychosynthesis,. Transactional Analysis, journal 
writing, fantasy, and meditation as pathways for 
personal growth and religious experiencing, and for 
revitalizing the church. There will be opportunity 
within the class to practice leadership skills. Con- 
sent of instructor required. 
Anderson ]une 9-14 Intensive Spring 

CTS TEC-565 

Seminar: Whitehead & Depth Psychology 

Selected concepts derived from contemporary 
Freudian and Jungian psychoanalysis will be 
analyzed from the perspective of Whitehead's 
philosophy. Consent of instructor required. 
Moore /Schroeder W 2-5 Spring 

LSTC M-320 

Ministry in Pastoral Care (Teaching Parish) 

A foundational course in pastoral ministry con- 
sisting of historical and theological perspectives for 
pastoral care as well as contemporary situation- 
oriented workshops. Includes regular consultation 
between classroom and field staff as well as periodic 
inclusion of the latter in classroom workshops. 
Bauermeister TTh 10:45-12:15 Spring 

Swanson TTh 8: 15-9:45 Spring 

LSTC M-416 

Hispanic Pastoral Dynamics 

(Dinamica Pastoral Hispanica) 

The realities of the Hispanic communities in the 
USA and their implications for ministry form the 



core of this course. It is an exploration of the pro- 
blems a minister encounters in the development of 
strategies for an effective ministry among 
Hispanics. Taught in English and Spanish. 
Navarro Th 7-10 p.m. Spring 

LSTC M-535 
Psychology of Religion 

A study of psychology's attempt to provide a 
systematic description and clinical analysis of 
religious experience and behavior. Consideration 
will be given to the perspectives and contributions 
of leading figures in the field, including Freud and 
Jung. (Prereq: LSTC M-320 or equiv.) 
Swanson F 8-12:15 Spring 

LSTC M-622 C and F 

Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling 

Supervised clinical work in marriage and family 
therapy in the Marriage and Family Therapy 
Center in Palos Park. Therapy with individuals, 
couples, families together with theoretical input 
and staff evaluation sessions and case review. 
Limited to D.Min. in P.C.C. students. 
Swanson TBA Spring 

MTS M-429 

Human Development in the Church 

This course aims at an ecclesiology of caring and an 
understanding of the dynamics of corporate life. 
Drawing upon the work of Browning, Fowler, 
Kegan and Hauerwas, students in the class will 
engage in an exploration of how the church can be 
both a culture and an occasion for care. 
Ashby F 9-1 1:50 Spring 

NBTS M-496 
Marriage Enrichment 

This course explores the possibilities and problems 
in marriage enrichment. Issues such as intimacy, 
communication skills and personal growth will be 
examined. Couples will be encouraged to take part 
in exercises that will help them understand con- 
flicts and how to resolve them and the importance 
of openness in marriage. 
Taylor M 7-9:40 p.m. Spring 

NBTS M-394 

Theories of Personality and Counseling 

Class members will examine and critique four 
theories of personality and the accompanying 
counseling techniques. Theorists studied will be: 
Freud, Jung, Skinner and Fromm. Classes will also 
include counseling exercises, case assessments and 



66 



Liturgy and Worship 



Pastoral Studies 



student presentations on a topic of their interest in 

personality theory. 

Tyson T 7'9:40 p.m. Spring 



III. LITURGY & WORSHIP 
STUDIES 

BTS M-574 

Music in the Life of the Church 

A study of hymnody with special emphasis on the 
function of music in the life of the local congrega- 
tion. 
Faus WF10:40'12 Fall 

CTU T-350 A&B 

Basic Principles of Catholic Worship 

An exploration of some key dimensions, forms and 
principles of pastoral liturgy in the light of Vatican 
II through practicum exercises, lectures, readings 
and study projects. Students will participate in 
three lab sessions on dates to be announced at the 
beginning of the course. Lab Fee. 
Hughes Sec. A MW 10:30-1 1:45 Spring 

Keifer Sec.B MW 1:30-2:45 Spring 

CTU M'486, 487, 488 

Advanced Ministry Practicum: Worship 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Keifer TBA FAll 486 /Winter 487/ 

Spring 488 



CTUM-517 
ReconciUation Practicum 

(For course description, see Winter.) 
Faso T 7-9:30 p.m. 

Faso T 1:30-4 



an effective and liturgically appropriate homily. 
Accountability: assigned readings, discussions and 



CTUM-518 
Worship Practicum 

(For course description, see Winter.) 
TBA T 1:30-4 

TBA T 7-9:30 p.m. 



Winter 
Spring 



Wmter 
Spring 



CTU 1-490 
Bible and Liturgy 

An investigation of the use of the scriptures in the 
Sunday liturgies of the major seasons of the 
liturgical year. The seminar will focus on the dif- 
ference between each text's interpretation in the 
biblical context and in the liturgical context. Its 
purpose will be to draw out the presuppositions for 



a paper. 
LaVerdiere 



Th 1:30-4 



spring 



CTSCM-318 

Music Resources for the Liturgy 

Survey of sacred music literature; history and 
philosophy of sacred music; practical discussion 
and available sources of choral, organ, solo, hymn 
and instrumental music; resources for age group 
choirs and the general music program for the con- 
gregation. 
Winfield M 2-5 Spring 

LSTC M-384 

The History and Practice of Chanting 

A laboratory course in acquiring the necessary 

vocal, musical, and reading skills to chant the Holy 

Communion and minor services in an edifying 

manner. Evaluation of the chant's historical 

development. 

Bangert MW 11-12:15 - Spring 

LSTC M-584 

The Architecture of Prayer 

A bridge course, connecting language, worship and 
spirituality. Survey of prayer and blessing as used 
in the liturgical life of the church. Examination of 
contemporary theories of metaphor and their rela- 
tion to the prayer life of individuals and church. 
Emphasis on language of prayer as a revelation of 
the life-world of those who pray. (Prereq: LSTC 
M-380 or equiv.) 
Rochelle MWF 9-9:50 Spring 

MTSM-314 

Understanding the Dynamics of 

Corporate Worship 

We begin by studying the nature of authentic, cor- 
porate Christian worship, from theological, 
historical and pastoral perspectives. In light of that 
understanding we then explore what gives integrity 
to the Sacraments, order of worship, public 
prayers, weddings, funerals, music in worship, 
children in the sanctuary and the observance of 
the Christian year. 
Wardlau' TTh 10-11:50 Spring 



67 



1 



Preaching and Communication 



IV. PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

CTU M-450 

The Homily in the Sunday Assembly 

(For course description, see Fall.) 



Hughes 



Bai 



Bai 



AB Seminar M 9-10:15 Fall 

A Lab W8:15'10:15 

B Lab W 3-5 p.m. 

AB Seminar W 9- 1 0: 1 5 Winter 

A Lab F 8:15-10:15 

B Lab F 10:30-12:30 

AB Seminar W 9-10:15 Spring 

A Lab F 8:15-10:15 

B Lab F 10:30-12:30 



CTU M-453 

Preaching in a Hispanic Context 

We will study and search for models that are ger- 
mane to Hispano culture. Team taught Hispanic 
Culture course. 
Guerrero /Staff TBA Spring 



CTU M-552 

Advanced Practicum in Preaching 

Open to students who have taken a CTU'400 level 
or Cluster equivalent course, this practicum gives 
opportunities for refining and expanding preaching 
skills through self-critical analysis, peer evaluation 
and intensive personal guidelines from instructor. 
Enrollment by permission from instructor. Audio- 
visual fee. 
Baumer W 3-5:30 Spring 



CTS CM-303 
Preaching 

The theology and practice of the preaching 
ministry. The approach will emphasize both the art 
of sermon preparation and the place of preaching 
in pastoral ministry. Because preaching integrates a 
variety of theological and pastoral skills, this course 
is for second and third year students. 
Dow Edgerton TTh 11-12:20 Spring 



LSTC M-540 

Language of Preaching: Shared Story 

A seminar to investigate the language form and 
theological implications of story. Readings will in- 
clude stories of the rabbis, short stories, and 
autobiographical stories. Students will compose 
and share stories dealing with selected experiences 
and theological themes. For seniors at LSTC. 
Niedenthal MW 1-2:15 Spring 

MTSM-316 

The Dynamics of Speech Communication 

This course helps each student to define his/her 
personal communications style. Students will give 
regular, in-class presentations to test and refine 
their skills. Analyzing and responding to in-class 
presentations will help students generate critical 
standards by which to guide future performances. 
Wilson Fl-4 Spring 

MTS M-328 

Preaching, Worship and Music in 

the Black Church 

The purpose of this course is to understand and ap- 
preciate the worship experience of the Afro- 
American Church. Attention will be given to the 
identification of the significant and distinct 
features of Black worship, preaching and music, 
and to the design of worship experiences that have 
a Black cultural emphasis. As a part of the course, 
students will be expected to attend worship in 
selected local Black congregations. 
Adjunct TBA Spring 

MTS M-450 

Preaching and Hispanic Literature 

This course for preaching in Hispanic congrega- 
tions introduces the student to the rich resources 
in Spanish literature and its place and role in 
preaching. Taught in Spanish. 

Arrastia ■ TBA Spring 

MTS M-509 

Advanced Seminar in Preaching 

A seminar course for students who have had 
M-315 or its equivalent and substantial work in ex- 
egesis. The course will meet for five weeks begin- 
ning approximately April 29, 1985. 
Davies TBA Spring 



68 



Educational Ministry 



Preaching and Communication 



NBTS M-592 

Preaching from the Torah 

This course is a senior seminar-practicum in 
biblical preaching focused on the exegesis and in- 
terpretation of selected texts from the Torah. It is 
designed to explore creatively the relationship bet- 
ween biblical and contemporary hermeneutics for 
the proclamation of the gospel story. Prerequisite: 
M-391 The Church and Preaching. 
Wilson WF 10:40' 12 Spring 



V. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

CTU M-480, 481, 482 
Advanced Ministry Practicum: 
Religious Education 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Lucimo TBA Fall 480 /Winter 481/ 

Spring 482 

CTS CM-426 

Five Contemporary Approaches 

to Christian Education 

How do you approach Christian Education? 
Should Christian educators trasmit facts, build a 
faith community, journey developmentally, 
liberate the oppressed or transform persons within 
a culture? We will read and discuss six texts, in- 
cluding Bowman, Westerhoff, Wilcox, Freire, Win- 
quigt, Seymour and Miller. 
Myers 7 9:30-12:20 Spring 

LSTC M-461 

Baptism, First Communion, and Confirmation 

A study of the biblical, historical, and doctrinal 
aspects of this ministry and its development in the 
church today. Emphasis will be placed on an in- 
depth study of curriculum, teaching methods, and 
programs for baptism, first communion, and confir- 
mation. 
Bozeman M7-10p.m. Spring 

LSTC M-463 

Adult Christian Education 

This course begins with a study of research on 
adult development and the implications for Chris- 
tian education. Curricular resources for meeting a 
wide variety of adult educational needs are exam- 
ined. 
Conrad TTh 11-12:15 Spring 



MTS M-445 

Travelling Seminar on the Church in 

the People's Republic of China 

The seminar will include one week of orientation 
in Hong Kong and an additional week in the same 
location at the conclusion o{ three weeks of travel 
in China. Leaders will include Franklin and Jean 
Wu, as well as Professor Rigdon. Further informa- 
tion available from McCormick Seminary upon re- 
quest. Departure date in the last week of March, 
1985. 
Rigdon TBA Spring 

MTS M-446 

Travelling Seminar to Central America 

This seminar will visit Mexico, Nicaragua, and 
Costa Rica. Departure date during the last week of 
March. Orientation to be in 6th or 7th week of 
winter quarter. For more information contact Pro- 
fessor Ismael Garcia. 
Garcia TBA ^p^i^^g 

M/L M-305 

Religious Education for Ministers 

An introductory course emphasizing the 
knowledge and skills in religious education needed 
by parish ministers serving smaller churches. Par- 
ticular attention will be given to the development 
of theological understanding of the place and pur- 
pose of religious education, identifying human and 
curricular resources, and balancing task orienta- 
tion and people orientation in the management of 
religious education programs. An attempt will be 
made to meet the individual student needs and in- 
terests relative to religious education. 
TBA TBA Spring 

NBTS M-483 

Models for Teaching the Bible 

After investing two-three weeks in a detailed ex- 
egetical study of a selected portion of Scripture, 
students will teach, experience and critique, in 
class and in parish settings, models for teaching 
Scripture, such as those developed by Groome, 
Wink, Edge, Furnish, Westerhoff, Rood and 
others. 
Morris M 9:30-12:10 Spring 

NBTS M'482 

Ministry with the Growing Child 

In this course students will study and experience 
characteristics of children and ways of ministering 
to them. Topics will include the social context of 
home, school, and TV, as well as the child's 



69 



Educational Ministry 



Canon Law 



understanding of theological concepts. Models for 
worship and Christian education with children will 
be explored. Prerequisites: M-380 Seminar in 
Human Development or permission of the instruc- 



tor. 
Morris 



Th 7-9:40 p.m. 



Spring 



Hispanic resource material and ecclesiastical 
realities in order to be relevant to contextual 
educational needs. Practice teaching and reflection 
will take place in small groups, both in class as well 
as the church context. 
Cruz Sa9'll -.40 and 24:40 Spring 



NBTS M-382 

Organization and Administration of 

Christian Education 

This course is a graduate seminar where students 
will research and discuss topics relating to manag- 
ing the church's educational program. Subjects for 
consideration include: evaluation, financial plan- 
ning, leadership development, management 
theory, planning, organizational models and pro- 
fessional growth. 
Staff TTh 11-12:20 Spring 

NBTS M-381H 

Educational Ministry of Hispanic Churches 

This course, taught in Spanish, aims to develop an 
understanding of the biblical theological, 
psychological, philosophical and socio-cultural 
foundations for educational ministry of the 
Hispanic churches - a ministry that considers the 



VI. CANON LAW 

CTU M-422 

Legal Aspects of the Sacraments 

(For course description, see Winter.) 
Huels MW 3-4:15 

Huels TTh 10:30-11:45 



Winter 
Spring 



CTU M-523 
Religious Law 

Through lecture and through class discussion 
drawing on the participants' experience in religious 
life, the seminar aims to provide a practical 
knowledge of the new canon law for members of 
religious institutes, covering such topics as internal 
governance, relations to church and hierarchy, 
rights of religious, formation, apostolate. 
Hue/5 T 1:30-4 Spring 



70 



SPECIAL AREAS OF INTEREST WITHIN COURSES OF STUDY 

HISPANIC STUDIES 

Hispanic Ministry programs and courses in the Cluster seek 1) to train Hispanic and 
Spanish-speaking non-Hispanics for Hispanic ministries, using specially designed 
courses most of which are offered in the Spanish language, and 2) more broadly, to in- 
corporate Hispanic issues, contributions, and perspectives, through a variety of ap- 
proaches, into the total life of the Cluster and its preparation of ministers. 

CTU H-423 A Socio-Cultural History of the Catholic Church in the Southwest: 

A Chicano Perspective 
Guerrero MW 10:30-1 1:45 See Historical Studies IV FALL 

LSTC T-310H Introduccion a la Teologia (Introduction to Theology) 

Navarro Th 7-10 p.m. See Theological Studies I FALL 

MTS H-310 Hispanic Church Reformers 

Nieto TBA See Church History Studies II FALL 

NETS B-324H Antiguo Testamento II: Literatura de Israel 

Fuerst M 7-9:40 p.m. See Old Testament Studies I FALL 

NBTS B-331H The Synoptic Gospels 

Weiss Th 6-8:40 p.m. See New Testament Studies II FALL 

NBTS B-332H The Pauline Epistles 

Weiss F 8-9:20 and 10:40-12 See New Testament Studies II FALL 

NBTS C-458aH Social Ethics I: An Historical Third World Perspective 

Mottesi T 6-8:40 p.m. See Ethical Studies II FALL 

CTU M-436 Theological Basis for Community Organizing: Theory and Practice 
Guerrero MW 10:30-1 1:45 See Ministry Studies I WINTER 

CTU M-437 Liturgical Renewal in the Hispanic Context 

Guerrero/Perez M 3-5:30 See Ministry Studies III WINTER 

LSTC M-371 Ministerios Multiculturales (Multicultural Ministry) 

Navarro TF 1-2:15 See Ministry Studies 1 WINTER 

MTS B-419 The Exile and the Biblical Theology of Hope 

Pagan TBA See Old Testament Studies III WINTER 

MTS E-3 1 1 Scripture and Ethics 

Garcia F 9-1 1:50 See Ethical Studies I WINTER 

MTS H-486 The Development of Hispanic Protestantism in the U.S. 

Armendariz W 7-9:50 p.m. See Church History Studies V WINTER 

NBTS C-341H Early and Medieval Christianity: An Inquiry from the Underside of 

History 
Araya MTh 6-8:40 p.m., January 7 - February 8 See Historical Studies I WINTER 

NBTS C-342H Reformation and Modern Christianity: An Inquiry from the Underside 

of History 
Araya MTh 6-8:40 p.m., February 1 1 - March 15 See Historical Studies I WINTER 

NBTS C-458bH Social Ethics II: An Historical Third World Perspective 

Mottesi T 6-8:40 p.m. See Ethical Studies II WINTER 

71 



CTU M'453 Preaching in a Hispanic Context 

Guerrero/Staff TBA See Ministry Studies IV SPRING 

CTU T-449 Black, Chicano, and Latin American Liberation Theologies: 

A Comparative Analysis 
Guerrero MW 1 :30'2:45 See Theological Studies III SPRING 

LSTC B'312H Estudios en el Antiguo Testament III (Old Testament III) 

Fuerst MWF 1 M 1:50 See Old Testament Studies I SPRING 

LSTC M-416 Dinamica Pastoral Hispanica (Hispanic Pastoral Dynamics) 

Navarro Th 7T0 p.m. See Ministry Studies II SPRING 

MTS M'446 Travelling Seminar to Central America 

Garcia TBA See Ministry Studies V SPRING 

MTS T-315 Hispanic-American Cultural Resources for Theological Reflection 
Armendariz M 7-9:50 p.m. See Theological Studies III SPRING 

MTS M-432 Preaching and Hispanic Literature 

Arrastia TBA See Ministry Studies IV SPRING 

NBTS B-334H The Gospel of John 

Weiss Th 6-8:40 p.m. See New Testament II SPRING 

NBTS B-43IH New Testament: A Third World Reading 

Weiss F 8-9:20 and 10:40-12 See New Testament Studies I SPRING 

NBTS C-458cH Social Ethics III: An Historical Third World Perspective 

Mottesi T 6-8:40 p.m. See Ethical Studies II SPRING 

NBTS M-381H Educational Ministry of Hispanic Churches 

Cruz Sa 9- 1 1 :40 and 2-4 See Ministry Studies V SPRING 

BLACK STUDIES 

The following course listings represent the interest of the Cluster, its schools, and its 
personnel in some specific issues posed for theological education and ministry by the ex- 
periences and perspectives of Blacks. 



GTS TEC-390 The Black Religious Heritage I 

Cummings M 6:30-9:30 p.m. See Theological Studies I 

LSTC T-434 Theology of Martin Luther King, Jr. 

Pero TF 1-2:15 See Theological Studies II 

MTS H-329 The Black Religious Heritage 

Ashby et al. M 6:30-9:30 p.m. See Historical Studies II 

GTS TEC-390 The Black Religious Heritage II 

Cummings M 6:30-9:30 p.m. See Theological Studies I 

CTS TEC-346 Theological Images in Black Literature 
Cummings T 6:30-9:30 p.m. See Theological Studies III 

LSTC T-430 Black Theology and the Black Church 

Pero TF 1-2:15 See Theological Studies III 

MTS M-328 Preaching, Worship and Music in the Black Church 
TBA TBA See Ministry Studies IV 



FALL 

FALL 

FALL 

WINTER 

SPRING 

SPRING 

SPRING 



72 



JUDAIC STUDIES 

In order to bring the Cluster community significantly in touch with Jewish life and 
thought, the Cluster offers courses in the history, religion and ideas of the Jewish people. 
Cluster students are encouraged to take advantage o( the course offerings at Spertus 
College of Judaica with whom the Cluster has an agreement for reciprocal free cross- 
registration of students. A Spertus catalog can be obtained by writing to: 

Spertus College of Judaica 

618 South Michigan Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60605 

(312)922-9012 

CTU T-303 Introduction to Judaism and Jewish Thought 

Perelmuter MW 9- 10: 1 5 See Theological Studies 1 FALL 

CTU B-526 Rabbinic Judaism and the Early Church 

Perelmuter M 3-5:30 See Biblical Studies I FALL 

CTS CH-415 Jewish Approaches to Biblical Exegesis in Concept and in Practice 
Eckstein M 6:30-9:30 p.m. See Old Testament Studies II FALL 

CTU B-529 Jewish Mysticism and Messianism 

Perelmuter MW 3-5:30, January 7 - February 20 See Old Testament Studies III WINTER 

CTS CH-420 The Notion of Covenant in the Intertestamental Literature 

LaCocque T 2-5 See Old Testament Studies III WINTER 



WOMEN^S STUDIES 

Women's issues and theological thinking are an integral part of the Cluster, its student 
life, faculty concerns and courses. In addition to a concerned group of students in most 
of the Cluster schools, there is a Caucus of Women Faculty and Ad- 
ministrators and a Feminist Theological Coalition, whose responsibility is to generate 
ideas and programs for the purpose of raising consciousness with regard to the many 
roles of women in ministry, theological thinking and theological education. Contact 
persons: 

Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) Jean Bozeman (LSTC) 

Dianne Bergant or Carol Allen (MTS) 

Steven Murphy (CTU) Gene Reeves (M/L), Dean 

Elizabeth Bacon or VaCountess Johnson or 

Dorothy Bass (CTS) David Scholer (NBTS), Dean 

CTS TEC-495 Women in Crisis 

Thistlethwaite/Ruether T 2-5 See Theological Studies III FALL 

CTS CH-490 Women & Religion: The Literary Imagination 

Bass Th 9:30-12:20 See Historical Studies V WINTER 

LSTC T-461 Feminist Theology 

Bloomquist TTh 11-12:15 See Theological Studies III WINTER 

NBTS M-497a Female Models of Spirituality 

Morris Th 7-9:40 p.m. See Theological Studies IV WINTER 

73 



CLUSTER PERSONNEL 

FACULTY AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 



Carol J. Allen (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
Mijustr^ and Director of Field Based Programs 
B.A., Michigan State University; M.Div., Col- 
gate Rochester Divinity School; M.S.W., 
Tulane University, School of Social Work. 

C. Douglas Amidon (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Christian Education (Regional Director, Young 
Life) 

B.A., University of California at Los Angeles; 
M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

Philip A. Anderson (CTS) Professor of Pastoral 
Theology 

B.A., Macalester College; B.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Edinburgh. 

Philip V. Anderson (LSTC) Instructor, Director of 
Chaplaincy Services, Augustana Hospital 
B.A., Augustana College; M.Div., Augustana 
Theological Seminary; Study, University of 
Chicago. 

Ruben Armendariz (MTS) Professor of Ministry 
and Director of the Hispanic Ministries Program 
B.A., University of Texas; B.D., Austin 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary; Study, 
Presbyterian Institute of Industrial Relations. 

Ronald C. Arnett (BTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Communication 

B.S., Manchester College; M.A., Ohio Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Ohio University. 

Cecilio Arrastia (CTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Preaching 

B.A., University of Havana; M.Div., 
Seminario Evangelico de Puerto Rico; Th.M., 
McCormick Theological Seminary; D.Min., 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Homer U. Ashby, Jr. (MTS) Assistant Profes- 
sor of Pastoral Care 

B.A., Princeton University; M.Th., D.Min., 
University of Chicago; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Raymond J. Bakke (NBTS) Professor of Ministry 
Moody Bible Institute; B.A., Seatde Pacific 
College; M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School; S.T.M., McCormick Theological 
Seminary; D.Min., McCormick Theological 
Seminary. 

Mark P. Bangert (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Associate Professor of Ministry (Worship 



and Music) 

B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., 
S.T.M., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., 
Ph.D. cand., University of Minnesota. Study, 
Indiana University; Northwestern University; 
St. John's University. 

Claude Marie Barbour (CTU) Associate Professor 
of World Mission 

S.T.M., New York Theological Seminary; 
S.T.D., Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary. 

Paula S. Datsko Barker (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer 
in Church History 

B.M., University of Michigan; M.Div., Yale 
Divinity School; Ph.D. (cand.). University of 
Chicago Divinity School; Study, Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary. 

Dorothy C. Bass (CTS) Assistant Professor of 
Church History 

B.A., Wellesley College; M.A., Union 
Theological Seminary and Columbia Universi- 
ty; Ph.D., Brown University. 

Paul J. Bauermeister (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Ministry (Pastoral Care and 
Counseling) 

B.A., M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Wheat Ridge 
Foundation Mental Health Fellow. 

Fred A. Baumer, C.PP.S. (CTU) Assistant Profes- 
sor of Preaching and Communications 
B.A., M.A., University of Dayton; M.F.A., 
Catholic University of America; Ph.D. cand.. 
Northwestern University. 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. (CTU) Associate Profes- 
sor of Old Testament Studies and Director of 
M.T.S. Program 

B.S., Marian College; M.A., Ph.D., St. Louis 
University. 

Benigno P. Behran, S.V.D. (CTU) Visiting 
Lecturer in Mission Theology 
M.A., De la Salle University; S.T.L., S.T.D. 
cand., Gregorian University. 

Robert W. Bertram (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Historical and Systematic 
Theology 

B.A., Diploma in Theology, Concordia 
Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Chicago. 



74 



Reidar B. Bjornard (NBTS) Professor of Old 
Testament 

Cand. Theol., University of Oslo; Th.D., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Study, 
Uppsala University; American School of 
Oriental Research, Jerusalem. 

Karen L. Bloomquist (LSTC) Assistant Professor 
of Church and Society 

B.A., St. Olaf College; M.Div., Pacific 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; M.Phil., 
Ph.D. cand.. Union Theological Seminary, 
New York. 

Robert G. Boling (MTS) Professor of Old Testament 
B.S., Indiana State College; M.Div., McCor- 
mick Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University; Study, American Schoc:)l 
of Oriental Research, Jerusalem. 

David J. Bowman, S.J. (CCTS) Cluster 
Coordinator 

B.A., M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Lie. 
Phil, and Lie. Theol., West Baden College; 
S.T.D., Gregorian University, Rome. 

Jean Bozeman (LSTC) Associate Professor of 
Educational MmLstr>' and Dean of Students 
A.B., Lenoir Rhyne College; M.A., Temple 
University; M.A., University of Chicago; 
Study at Michigan State University, 
Millersville State College. 

Carl E. Braaten (LSTC) Professor of Systematic 
Theology 

A.B., St. Olaf College; B.Th., Luther 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity; Fulbright Scholar, University of Paris (Sor- 
bonne); Sinclair Kennedy Traveling Fellow, 
University of Heidelberg. 

Dale W. Brown (BTS) Professor of Christian 
Theology 

B.A., McPherson College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Ralph Wendell Burhoe (M/L) Professor Emeritus 
of Theology and Science 

Sc.D., Meadville/Lombard Theological 
School. 

John E. Burkhart (MTS) Professor of Theology 
B.A., D.D., Occidental College; B.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Southern California; Study, University Col- 
lege, London. 

William Burrows, S.V.D. (CTU) Lecturer in 
Doctrinal Theology 
B.A., Divine Word College; S.T.B., S.T.L., 



Pontifical Gregorian University; Ph.D. cand. 
University of Chicago. 



Elizabeth F. Caldwell (MTS) Assistant Professor 
of Education and Ministry 

B.A., Southwestern University, Memphis; 
M.Ed., Vanderbilt University; Study, 
Presbyterian School of Christian Education; 
University of North Alabama. 

Edward F. Campbell (MTS) Francis A. McCau' 
Professor of Old Testament 

B.A., Yale University; B.D., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University. 

Ian M. Chapman (NBTS) Adjunct Professor m the 
Doctor of Ministry Program (Pastor, Third Baptist 
Church, St. Louis) 

B.A., University of Hawaii; B.D., Eastern Bap- 
tist Theological Seminary; D.Min., McCor- 
mick Theological Seminary. Study: University 
of California, Santa Barbara; Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

Andriy Freishyn-Chirovsky (CTU) Lecturer in 
Eastern Christum Theology 

Ph.B., Pontifical Urban University, Rome; 

M.A., University of St. Michael's College, 

. Toronto; S.T.D. cand., Saint Mary of the Lake 

Seminary. Study, University of Notre Dame. 

Pauline M. Coffman (MTS) Adjunct Lec- 
turer in Ministry 

B.A., University of Minnesota; M.S., McCor- 
mick Theological Seminary; M.A., Johns 
Hopkins University; Study, Johns Hopkins 
University. 

Adela Yarbro Collins (MTS) Professor of Ncir 
Testament 

B.A., Pomona College; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard 
University; Study, University of Portland; 
University of Tubingen. 

Robert L. Conrad (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Ministry (Christian Echica- 
tion) 

B.A., M.Div., S.T.M., Concordia Seminary, 
St. Louis; M.A. in Education, Washington 
University; Ph.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary. 

George C. L. Cummings (CTS) Instructor of 
Theology 

B.A., Gordon College; M.Div., Gordon- 
Conwell Theological School; S.T.M., Union 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., Union 
Theological Seminary. 



75 



Frederick W. Danker (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of 'New Testament 
B.A., M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. Study, 
Washington University. 

William J. Danker (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Missions, Emeritus 
Diploma, Concordia College, Milwaukee; 
Diploma, Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; 
M.A., Wheaton College; D.Theol., University 
of Heidelberg. Study, University of Chicago. 

Elam Davies (MTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Preaching and Pastor Emeritus, Fourth Presbyterian 
Church, Chicago 

B.A., University of Wales, Cardiff; M.A., 
Cambridge University, England; Study, 
Theological Seminary of Bala, G.B. 

Donald W. Dayton (NBTS) Professor of Theology 
and Ethics 

B.A., Houghton College; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School; M.S. in L.S., University of Kentucky; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago; Study: Colum- 
bia University; Union Theological Seminary; 
American Institute of Holy Land Studies; 
Asbury Theological Seminary; University of 
Tubingen. 

David E. Deppe (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Associate Professor of Ministry (Preaching 
and Social Ministry) 

B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Con- 
cordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., Ph.D. cand., 
St. Louis University. Study, University of Min- 
nesota; Academia Hispano Americana. 

Raymond Diesbourg, M.S.C. (CTU) Instructor in 
Ethics, Registrar and Director of Admissions 
B.A., DePaul University; M.Div., Catholic 
Theological Union; S.T.L., S.T.D. cand., 
Lateran University, Rome. 

Vicky Schreiber Dill (BTS) Adjunct Facidty 
in Preaching 

B.S., Millersville State College; M.S., Universi- 
ty of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Notre 
Dame. 

Carl S. Dudley (MTS) Professor of Church and 
Community 

B.A., Cornell University; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Study, New York 
School of Social Work, Washington Universi- 
ty, Industrial Areas Foundation. 

Donald F. Durnbaugh (BTS) Professor of Church 
History 



B.A., Manchester College; M.A., University of 
Michigan; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

W. Dow Edgerton (CTS) Albert W. Palmer 
Visiting Professor of Ministry 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.Div., 
Chicago Theological Seminary. 

Ralph H. Elliott (NBTS) Adjunct Professor in the 
Doctor of Ministry Program and Senior Minister, 
North Shore Baptist Church, Chicago 
A.B., Carson Newman College; B.D., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Post 
Graduate Visiting Scholar, Union Theological 
Seminary; Additional Study: Yale Divinity 
School; Princeton Theological Seminary; Inter- 
national Theological Seminary; University of 
Hamburg, Berlin, Munich, W. Germany; Lan- 
caster Theological Seminary. 

J. Ronald Engel (M/L) Professor of Social 
Ethics 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; B.D., Mead- 
ville/Lombard Theological School; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Norman R. Ericson (NBTS) Adjunct Professor of 
New Testament 

A.A., Trinity Seminary and Bible College, 
Chicago; B.A., University of Nebraska, Lin- 
coln; B.D., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School, Chicago; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Nancy R. Faus (BTS) Associate Professor of 
Practical Theology and Worship, Campus Minister 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Col- 
umbia University; D.Min., Chicago 
Theological Seminary. 

Earle W. Fike, Jr. (BTS) Adjunct Faculty 
in Preaching 

B.A., Bridgewater College; B.D., M.Th., 
Bethany Theological Seminary; Study at 
Northwestern University. 

Thomas N, Finger (NBTS) Associate Professor of 
Systematic Theology 

B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Gordon Divini- 
ty School; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School; 
Fulbright Scholar, University of Munich; 
Fellow, Institute for the Advanced Study of 
Religion (University of Chicago). 

Robert H. Fischer (LSTC) Professor of Church 
History 

A.B., Gettysburg College; B.D., Lutheran 
Theological Seminary, Gettysburg; Ph.D., Yale 
University. Study at Tubingen University. 



76 



Archimedes Fornasari, M.C.C.J. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Ethics 

B.A., M.A., Xavier University; Ph.D., 
Catholic University of America. 

Nadine Pence Frantz (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Theology 

B.A., Manchester College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary. 

Wesley J. Fuerst (LSTC) Professor of Old 
Testament 

A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., 
Central Lutheran Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Princeton Theological Seminary; Study, 
University of Erlangen. 

Yoshio Fukuyama (CTS) Professor of Religion and 
Society and Academic Dean 
A.B., Doane College; B.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary and the University of 
Chicago; Ph.D., in Sociology of Religion, 
University of Chicago; D.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary. 

Ismael Garcia (MTS) Assistant Professor in Chris- 
tian Ethics and Assistant in the Hispanic Ministries 
Program 

B.A., University of Puerto Rico; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Richard B. Gardner (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Biblical Studies and Director of Education for a 
Shared Ministry Program (Editor, Biblical 
Resources, Parish Ministries, Commission, Office 
of the General Board of the Church of the 
Brethren, Elgin) 

B.A., Juniata College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; D.Theol., University of 
Wurzburg. 

David G. Gelzer (MTS) Visiting Professor 
of Mission 

B.A., University of Dubuque; B.D., Dubuque 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Neil W. Gerdes (M/L) and (CTS) Librarian and 
Assistant Professor of Bibliography 
A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard 
University; M.A., Columbia University; 
M.A.L.S., University of Chicago. 

Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp. (CTU) Lecturer in 
Mission Theology 
M.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Edinburgh. 

John Charles Godbey (M/L) Professor of Church 
History 

A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; B.D., 
Federated Theological Faculty, University of 



Chicago; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
Study, Polish Academy of Sciences. 

William H. Goddard (NBTS) Adjunct Professor m 
Ministry and Sr. Pastor, First Baptist Church, Oak 
Park, Illinois 

B.A., University of Denver; B.D., Yale Univer- 
sity Divinity School; S.T.M., Yale Divinity 
School; D.Min., McCormick Theological 
Seminary. 

Warren F. Groff (BTS) President and Professor of 
Christian Theology 

B.A., Juniata College; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Andres Guerrero (CTU) Assistant Professor of 
Hispanic Studies 

B.A., M.Th., M.A., University of St. Thomas; 
Th.M., Th.D., Harvard University. 

Hugh F. Halverstadt (MTS) Professorial Lecturer 
in Ministry and Area Group Coordinator in the 
Doctor of Ministry Program 
B.A., King College; B.D., Union Theological 
Seminary in Virginia; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of 
Doctrinal Theology 

B.A., Quincy College; Dr. Theol., Friederich- 
Wilhelm University, Bonn; Litt.D., St. 
Bonaventure University. 

Philip J. Hefner (LSTC) Professor of Systematic 
Theology and Director of Graduate Studies 
A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., 
Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; L.H.D., 
Midland College; Fulbright Scholar at Univer- 
sity of Tubingen. 

Ernest Henau, C.P. (CTU) Visiting Lecturer 
in Preaching 
S.T.L., S.T.D., University of Louvain. 

Kurt K. Hendel (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Associate Professor of Historical Theology 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Con- 
cordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio 
State University. Fulbright Scholar at Univer- 
sity of Gottingen. 

Allegra Hess (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in Colloquium 
B.A., Elizabethtown College; M.A., Indiana 
University; M.A., George Williams College. 

Earle Hilgert (MTS) Professor of hlew Testament 
B.A., Walla Walla College; B.D., Adventist 
Theological Seminary; M.A., University of 
Chicago; D.Theol., University of Basel. 



77 



Elvire Hilgert (MTS) Professorial Lecturer in 
Theological Librarianship 

B.A., Pacific Union College; M.S. in L.S., 
Catholic University of America; Study, Mills 
College; Adventist Theological Seminary; 
University of the Philippines; University of 
Basel. 

Nancy Wiles Holsey (BTS/NBTS) Adjunct 
Instructor in Greek 

B.S., Texas Wesleyan College; M.A. (Th.S.), 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Leslie J, Hoppe, O.F.M. (CTU) Assistant Professor 
of Old Testament Studies 

B.A., St. Francis College; M.A., Aquinas In- 
stitute of Theology; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University and Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary. 

Estella Boggs Horning (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Biblical Studies 

B.A., Manchester College; R.N., Presbyterian 
Hospital; M.Div., Bethany Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary and Northwestern 
University. 



Ralph Keifer (CTU) Professor of Liturgy 

B.A., Providence College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Notre Dame. 

Axel C. Kildegaard (LSTC) Professor of Ministry 
A.B., State University of Iowa; Cand. Theol., 
Grand View Seminary; S.T.M., Yale Univer- 
sity. 

Ralph W. Klein (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Old Testament 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Con- 
cordia Seminary, St. Louis; Th.D., Harvard 
University. Study, University of Michigan; 
University of Gottingen. 

Edgar M. Krentz (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of 'New Testament 
B.A., M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; 
M.A., Ph.D., Washington University. Study, 
University of Chicago; American School of 
Classical Studies, Athens; University of Tub- 
ingen. 

Andre LaCocque (CTS) Professor of Old Testament 
and Director, Center for fewish-Christian Studies 
D.Litt., D. Theol., University of Strasbourg. 



John Huels, O.S.M. (CTU) Assistant Professor 
of Church Law 

B.A., St. Louis University; M.A., M.Div., 
Catholic Theological Union; J.C.B., J.C.L., 
J. CD., Catholic University of America. 

Kathleen Hughes, R.S.CJ. (CTU) Assistant 
Professor of Liturgy 

B.A., Newton College; M.A., Catholic Univer- 
sity of America; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Notre Dame. 



Eugene A. LaVerdiere, S.S.S. (CTU) Adjunct 
Professor of New Testament Studies 
M.A., John Carroll University; S.T.L., Univer- 
sity of Fribourg; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical In- 
stitute; Eleve Titulaire, Ecole Biblique, 
Jerusalem; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Perry D. LeFevre (CTS) Professor of Theology 
B.A., Harvard University; B.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 



E. Alfred Jenkins (NBTS) Professor of Christian 
Education and Director of Doctoral Studies 
B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Northern Bap- 
tist Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago; Study: Harvard Univer- 
sity. CPE, Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital, 
Chicago. 

Robert W. Jensen (LSTC) Visiting Professor 
of Theology 

B.A., Luther College; M.Div., Luther 
Theological Seminary; Dr. Theol., Heidelberg 
University; L.H.D., Luther College. Study at 
University of Minnesota, Basel University. 



Albert Lehenbauer (NBTS) Adjunct Clinical In- 
structor in Pastoral Care 

A.A., St. John's College, Winfield, Ks.; B.A., 
Concordia Seminary; M.R.E., New Orleans 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Ed.D., New 
Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary; Study, 
College of Charleston, S.C.; Maryland Univer- 
sity; C.P.E., Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis; 
Southern Baptist Hospital, New Orleans; 
University Hospitals, Minneapolis; Swedish 
Covenant Hospital, Chicago; Certification by 
American Protestant Hospital Association; Pro- 
fessional Hospital Chaplain; Fellow College of 
Chaplains, APHA. 



Robert Karris, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of New 
Testament Studies 

B.A., Quincy College; S.T.B., Pontifical 
Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; S.T.L., 
Catholic University of America; Th.D., Har- 
vard University. 



William E. Lesher (LSTC) President 

A.B., Wittenberg University; M.Div., Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; D.D., Califor- 
nia Lutheran College; D.D., Pacific Lutheran 
University. 



78 



David L. Lindberg (LSTC) Director of Field Educa- 
tion 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College; M.Div., 
Augustana Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John Linnan, C.S.V. (CTU) President and As- 
sociate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 
B.A., Georgetown University; S.T.B., M.A., 
S.T.L., S.T.D., University of Louvain. 

Wilhelm C. Linss (LSTC) Professor of New 
Testament 

B.D. (equiv), University of Erlangen; Th.D., 
Boston University School of Theology; Study, 
University of Munster; University of Michigan. 

John M. Lozano, C.M.F. (CTU) Professor of 
Spiritual Theology 

B.A., Claretian College; S.T.L., Universite 
Catholique de I'Ouest, Angers; S.S.L., Pon- 
tifical Biblical Institute, Rom2; S.T.D., Univer- 
sity of St. Thomas, Rome. 

Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. (CTU) Instructor in Religious 
Education 

B.S., St. Mary of the Woods College; M.A., 
Mundelein College. 

George P. Magnuson (MTS) Professorial Lecturer 
in Church and Ministry and Major Project and 
Thesis Administrator of the Doctor of Ministry Pro- 
gram 

B.A., University of Minnesota; B.D., North 
Park Theological Seminary; M.A., D.VIin., 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Robert W. Mallonee, S.V.D. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Pastoral Care 

B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College; M.A., Loyola 
University, Chicago; M.A.L.S., Rosary Col- 
lege; D.Min., Chicago Theological Seminary. 

Paul Manz (LSTC) Christ Seminary -Semincx 
Professor of Ministry (Church Music) and Artist in 
Residence 

B.S. in Ed., Concordia College, River Forest; 
M.M., Northwestern University; Fulbright 
Scholar, First Prize in Organ and Improvisa- 
tion, Royal Flemish Conservatory at Antwerp, 
Belgium; Litt.D., Concordia College, Seward; 
D.Mus. (Hon.), Carthage College; L.H.D., 
Christ Seminary-Seminex. 

Marie McCarthy, S.P. (CTU) Instructor in Pastoral 
Care 

B.S., St. Mary of the Woods College; M.M., 
Butler University; M.A., Catholic Theological 
Union; Ph.D. cand., University of Chicago. 



Duncan Mcintosh (NBTS) Adjunct Professor in the 
Doctor of Ministry Program and Resource 
Developer, Evangelism Staff, National Ministries, 
American Baptist Churches of the USA. 
B.Mus., Houghton College; B.D., Th.M., 
Fuller Theological Seminary; D.Min., Eastern 
Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) Associate Professor 
of Biblical Theology 

B.A., Bridgewater College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Walter L. Michel (LSTC) Associate Professor of 
Old Testament 

B.D. (equiv.). University of Vienna; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Study, Univer- 
sity of Heidelberg; Chicago Lutheran 
Theological Seminary; Western Michigan 
University; Yale University; Pontifical Biblical 
Institute; Loyola University. 

Donald E. Miller (BTS) Bnghtbill Professor of 
Ministry Studies and Ethics and Director of 
Graduate Studies 

M.A., University of Chicago; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity; Study, Yale University; Cambridge 
University. 

Christopher Moore (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Ministry of Music (Minister of Music, First 
Unitarian Society, Chicago) 
A.B., Harvard; B.D., Meadville/Lombard; 
S.T.M., Harvard University. 

Robert L. Moore (CTS) Associate Professor of 
Theology and Personality 

B.A., Hendrix College; M.Th., Southern 
Methodist University; M.Th., Duke Univer- 
sity; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
Study, Alfred Adler Institute, Chicago. 

Wilda W. Morris (NBTS) Assistant Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.A., The American University; A.M., The 
University of Illinois; Ph.D., The University of 
Illinois; M.A. in C.E., M.Div., Northern Bap- 
tist Theological Seminary. 

Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) Assistant Professor 
of Religion and Society and Director of Hispanic 
Studies 

B.S., Polytechnic Institute, Buenos Aires; L. 
Soc, University of Argentina; B.Th., Latin 
American Biblical Seminary, San Jose, Costa 
Rica; Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D. cand., Emory University. Study, Inter- 
national Baptist Theological Seminary, Buenos 
Aires and Princeton University. 



79 



Lewis S. Mudge (MTS) Dean of the Seminary 
and Professor of Theology 

B.A., Princeton University; B.A., M.A., Ox- 
ford University; B.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; M.A., Amherst College; Ph.D., 
Princeton University; Study, University of 
Marburg; University of Paris. 

Steven Murphy (CTU) Dean of Students 

B.A., Boston College; M.A., Andover-Newton 
Theological Seminary; M.Ed., Loyola Universi- 
ty- 
William R. Myers (CTS) Assistant Professor of 
Christian Education and Director of Field Educa- 
tion 

M.Div., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; 
M.Ed., Rhode Island College; Ed.D., Loyola 
University of Chicago. 

William R. Myers (NBTS) President 

B.A., University of Cincinnati; B.D., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; D.D., Northern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; L.D.H., Sioux 
Empire College; Ed.D. (Hon.), Judson College; 
Study, Union Theological Seminary; Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

Thomas Nairn, O.F.M. (CTU) Instructor in 
Ethics 

B.A., Quincy College; M.Div., M.A., Catholic 
Theological Union; Ph.D. cand., University of 
Chicago. 

David Nasgowitz (BTS/NBTS) Adjunct Professor 
of Hebrew 

Th.B., North American Baptist Seminary; 
B.S., Marquette University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Robert Navarro (LSTC) Director of Hispanic 
Ministries Program and Lecturer in Theology 
Escuela Nacional de Maestros; B.D., Wartburg 
Theological Seminary; M.S.T., McCormick 
Theological Seminary. 

Robert W. Neff (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in Ministry, 
General Secretary, Office of the General Board, 
Church of the Brethren 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; B.D., Yale 
Divinity School; M.A., Ph.D., Yale University; 
Study, Cambridge University. 

William E. Nelson (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor 
in ABC Denominational Orientation; Executive 
Minister, Chicago Baptist Association, ABC/USA 
B.A., M.A., Western Illinois University. 

William R. Nelson (NBTS) Associate Professor 
of Ministry and Director of Field Education 



B.S., College of Charleston; B.D., Th.M., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Fulbright 
Scholar, University of Heidelberg. 

Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D. (CTU) Associate Pro- 
fessor of Church History 

B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, Techny; L.Miss., 
Gregorian University, Rome; M.A., Catholic 
University, Washington; Ph.D., Cambridge 
University. 

Morris J. Niedenthal (LSTC) Professor of Preaching 
B.S., Northwestern University; M.Div., 
Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Union Theological Seminary; Fulbright 
Scholar at Manchester University. 



Adjuni. 



Lecturer 



Jose C. Nieto (MTS) 
in Church History 

B.S., University of Santiago de Compostela, 
Spain; B.D., United Evangelical Seminary, 
Madrid; Th.M., Ph.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; Study, Presbyterian College, 
Ireland; Princeton University; Pontifical 
University of Salamanca. 

Eric H. Ohlmann (NBTS) Professor of Christian 
Heritage and Aissociate Dean 
B.A., University of Alberta; B.D., North 
American Baptist Seminary; Th.M., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
Graduate Theological Union; Study, 
Predigerseminar, Hamburg. 

Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. (CTU) Professor of 
Bibliography 

M.A.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois; Study, University of 
Detroit; Loyola University, Chicago; Saint 
Louis University; Spalding College. 

Carolyn A. Osiek, R.S.C.J. (CTU) Associate Pro- 
fessor of Neif Testament Studies 
B.A., Fontbonne College, St. Louis; M.A.T., 
Manhattanville College; Th.D., Harvard 
University. 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of 
Liturgy 

S.T.L., S.T.D., L.G., Pontifical Athenaeum 
Antonianum, Rome; Study, Harvard Universi- 
ty; University of California. 

Samuel Pagan (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Old Testament 

B.S., University of Puerto Rico; M.Div., 
Evangelical Seminary of Puerto Rico; M.Th., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Study, The 
Jewish Theological Seminary; Institute for 
Theological Research, Jerusalem. 



80 



Thomas D. Parker (MTS) Professor of Theology 
B.A., Los Angeles State College; B.D., San 
Francisco Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Study, 
University of Munich. 

John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. (CTU) Professor 
of Ethics and Director of M.A. Program 
A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Hayim Goren Perelmuter (CTU) Chautauqua 
Professor of Jewish Studies 

B.A., McGill University, Montreal; M.H.L., 
Jewish Institute of Religion, New York; D.H.L., 
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of 
Religion; D.D., Hebrew Union College, Cin- 
cinnati. 



Eugene F. Roop (BTS) Professor of Biblical 
Studies 

B.S., Manchester College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Claremont 
Graduate School. 

Theodore C. Ross, S.J. (CTU) Lecturer in Church 
History 

Litt. B., Xavier University; Ph.D., West Baden 
College; M.A. (History), M.A. (Theology), 
Loyola University of Chicago; S.T.L., Bellar- 
mine School of Theology. 

Byron P. Royer (BTS) Professor Emeritus of 
Pastoral Psychology 

B.S., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Northwestern 
University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 



Albert P. Pero, Jr. (LSTC) Associate Professor 
of Theology and Cross-Cultural Studies 
A.B., M.A., University of Detroit; B.Th., Con- 
cordia Theological Seminary, Springfield, IL; 
S.T.D., Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago. 



Thomas A. Schafer (MTS) Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., Maryville College; B.D., Louisville 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Duke University. 



Kenneth Pokrant (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Christian Education 

B.A., Judson College; M.Div., Northern Bap- 
tist Theological Seminary; Study, University of 
Chicago Divinity School. 

James N. Poling (BTS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Theology and Counseling 
B.A., Bridgewater College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., School of 
Theology in Claremont. 

Gene Reeves (M/L) Professor of Theology, Dean and 
Chief Executive 

A.B., University of New Hampshire; S.T.B., 
Boston University; Ph.D., Emory University. 

Thomas P. Reynolds, S.S.C. (CTU) Visitmg 
Lecturer in Mission Theology 
B.A., University of Hull; M.A., University of 
Wisconsin; M.A., Ph.D., Marquette Universi- 
ty- 

V. Bruce Rigdon (MTS) Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., College of Wooster; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School; M.A., Ph.D., Yale University; Study, 
Oxford University. 

Jay C. Rochelle (LSTC) Assistant Professor of 
Worship and Dean of the Chapel 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Con- 
cordia Seminary, St. Louis; Th.M., Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary; Study, Valparaiso 
University; Yale University. 



James A. Scherer (LSTC) Professor of Missions 
and Church History 

A.B., Yale University; B.D., Th.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; Study, Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; Columbia 
University; International Christian University, 
Japan; Oxford University. 

David M. Scholer (NBTS) Professor of Nett' 
Testament and Dean of the Seminary 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Wheaton Col- 
lege Graduate School; B.D., Gordon Divinity 
School; Th.D., Harvard Divinity School. 

Robert J. Schreiter, C.PP.S. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Doctrinal Theology and Dean 
B.A., St. Joseph's College; Th.Dr., University 
of Nijmegen; Study, Oxford University. 

W. Widick Schroeder (CTS) Professor of Religion 
and Society 

B.A., Bethel College; M.A., Michigan State 
University; B.D., Chicago Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Robin J. Scroggs (CTS) Professor of 'New 

Testament 

B.A., B.Mus., University of North Carolina; 

B.D., Duke University; Ph.D., Princeton 

University. 

Donald Senior, C.P. (CTU) Professor of New 
Testament Studies 

B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; 
Baccalaureat en Theologie, S.T.L., S.T.D., 
University of Louvain. 



81 



Neil H. Shadle (M/L) Associate Professor of 
Ministry and Dean of Students 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; B.D., Mead- 
ville/Lombard Theological School; D.Min., 
Pacific School of Religion. 

Franklin Sherman (LSTC) Professor of Christian 
Ethics and Dean 

A.B., Muhlenberg College; M.Div., Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; M.A., Oxford 
University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Joseph Sittler (LSTC) Distinguished Professor in 
Residence 

A.B., LL.D., Wittenberg University; B.D., 
Hamma School of Theology; D.D., Wagner 
College; L.H.D., Alfred University; Litt.D., 
Meadville Theological School; Study, Get- 
tysburg College; University of Notre Dame; 
Loyola University, Chicago; Oberlin College; 
University of Chicago; Western Reserve 
University; University of Heidelberg. 

Lee E. Snook (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer in 
Theology 

B.A., Gettysburg College; M.Div., Lutheran 
Theological Seminary, Gettysburg; S.T.M., 
Ph.D., Union Theological Seminary. 

Graydon F. Snyder (BTS) Wieand Professor of 
hlew Testament Studies and Dean 
B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Study, Pontifical In- 
stitute of Christian Archaeology, Rome; Cam- 
bridge University. 

Jack L. Stotts (MTS) President of the Seminary and 
Professor of Christian Ethics 
B.A., Trinity University; B.D., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Yale 
University, Study, Oxford University. 

Carroll Stuhlmueller, C.P. (CTU) Professor of 
Old Testament Studies 

B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; 
S.T.L., Catholic University; S.S.L., S.S.D., 
Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; D.H.L., St. 
Benedict College. 

Paul R. Swanson (LSTC) Professor of Pastoral 
Care 

A.B., Augustana College; M.Div., Augustana 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Andover- 
Newton Theological School; Ph.D., Boston 
University. 

John Paul Szura, O.S.A. (CTU) Assistant Professor 
of Psychology and Theology and Director of M.Div. 
Program 



B.A., Villanova University; M.A., St. Louis 
University; M.S., Ph.D., Illinois Institute of 
Technology; Ph.D., Fordham University. 

George J. Taylor (NBTS) Professor of Pastoral 
Care and Counseling 

Diploma, Escuela Artes y Oficios, Panama; 
Diploma Theology, Latin American Biblical 
Seminary, Costa Rica; B.A., Whitmore Col- 
lege; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University; 
Additional Studies, Fuller Theological 
Seminary. 

Susan B. Thistlethwaite (GTS) Assistant Professor 
of Theology and Culture 

B.A., Smith College; M.Div., Duke Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Duke University. 

John H. Tietjen (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Adjunct Professor of American Church 
History 

B.A., B.D., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; 
S.T.M., Th.D., Union Theological Seminary, 
New York. 

Robert L Tobias (LSTC) Professor of Ecumenics 
A.B., Phillips University; M.A., Graduate 
School of Theology, Phillips University; B.D., 
Union Theological Seminary; Th.D., Universi- 
ty of Geneva and Graduate School of 
Ecumenical Studies. 

David L. Vikner (LSTC) Adjunct Professor of 
World Mission 

A.B., Augustana College; B.D., D.D., 
Augustana Theological Seminary. Study, Yale 
Divinity School; University of California, 
Berkeley. 

Harold Vogelaar (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer 
in World Mission 

B.A., Central College; B.D., New Brunswick 
Theological Seminary; M.Phil., Ph.D., Colum- 
bia University. 

Arthur Voobus (LSTC) Professor Emeritus of 
hJew Testament and Church History 
Cand. Theol., Mag. Theol, Dr. Theol., 
University of Tartu, Estonia. 

Donald M. Vorp (MTS and LSTC) Director, 
jesuit'KrausS'McCormick Library 
B.A., Roberts Wesleyan College; B.D., Asbury 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., Drew 
University. 

Paul Wadell, C.P- (CTU) Instructor in Ethics 

B.A., Bellarmine College; M.Div., M.A., 
Catholic Theological Union; Ph.D. cand.. 
University of Notre Dame. 



82 



Murray L. Wagner (BTS) Librarian and Professor 
of Historical Research 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary Col- 
lege. 

Don Wardlaw (MTS) James G. K. McClure 
Professor of Preaching and Worship 
B.A., Columbia University; B.D., Union 
Theological Seminary in Virginia; Ph.D., 
University of Aberdeen. 

Mark 1. Wegener (LSTC) Instructor in Greek 
B.A., Concordia Senior College, Ft. Wayne; 
M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; 
S.T.M., Christ Seminary-Seminex. 

Laurence L. Welborn (MTS) Assistant Professor of 

Biblical Studies 

B.A., Harding College; M.A., Yale University 
Divinity School; M., Eberhard-Karl University 
Tubingen; M.A., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D. 
(cand.), University of Chicago. 

David J. Wieand (BTS) Professor Emeritus of 
Biblical Studies 

B.A., Juniata College; M.A., New York 
University; B.D., Bethany Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
Study, Chicago Institute of Psychoanalysis; Na- 



tional Training Laboratory; National Protes- 
tant Laboratory, Green Lake; American 
School of Oriental Research, Jerusalem; North- 
east Career Center, Princeton; Brook Lane 
Psychiatric Center, Hagerstown. 



Gail B. Wilson 

Communications 

B.A., Roosevelt University 

western University. 



(MTS) Lecturer in Speech 
M.A., North- 



Gary L. Wilson (NBTS) Associate Professor of 
Preachmg 

B.A., Illinois Wesleyan University; D.Min., 
School of Theology at Claremont; Ph.D. cand.. 
School of Theology at Claremont. 

Robert C. Worley (MTS) Professor of Education 
and Ministry and Director of the Doctor of 
Ministry Program 

B.A., Oklahoma State University; D.D.S., 
M.S., Northwestern University; B.D., McCor- 
mick Theological Seminary; Ed.D., Columbia 
University. 

Warren Cameron Young (NBTS) Distinguished 
Professor of Theology and Christian Philosophy, 
Emeritus 

A.B., Gordon College; B.D., Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Boston 
University; Study: University of Heidelberg; 
University of Basel. 



83 



LIBRARIANS 



Joan Blocher (CTS) Assistant Librarian 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A.L.S., 
Rosary College. 

Cheryl E. Dieter (jI*^M) Acquisitions Librarian, 
jcsuit'KrausS'McCormick Library 
B.A., Valparaiso University; M.A., University 
of Notre Dame. 

Hedda Durnbaugh (BTS/NBTS) Catalog and 
Special Collections Librarian, The Seminary 
Library, BTS/NBTS 

B.A. equivalent, University of Vienna; M.A., 
Northwestern University; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College; Study, Philipps University, Marburg. 

Neil W. Gerdes (M/L and CTS) Librarian and 
Assistant Professor of Bibliography 
A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard 
University; M.A., Columbia University; 
M.A.L.S., University of Chicago. 

Brian L. Helge G^^M) Principal Cataloguer and 
Records Coordinator, jesuit-Krauss-McCormick 
Library 

A.B., Indiana University; M.Div., Lutheran 
School of Theology at Chicago; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Notre Dame. 



Gertrude Priester i]KM) Ecumenical Parish 
Resource Center Supervisor, jesuit-Krauss- 
McCormick Library 

B.S., Grove City College; Graduate Study, 
Case Western Reserve University. 

Emilie G. Pulver QKM) Assistant Principal 
Cataloguer, Jesuit-Krauss-McCormick Library 
B.A., Case Western Reserve University; 
M.L.S., University of Chicago. 

Marlys Rudeen (CTU) Periodicals and Catalog 
Librarian 

B.A., North Park College; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College; M.Div., North Park Theological 
Seminary; Study at St. Andrews University, 
Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Kenneth M. Shaffer (BTS/NBTS) Assistant 
Librarian, The Seminary Library, BTS/NBTS 
A.B., Bridgewater College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Northern Il- 
linois University. 

Gwendolyn R. Vandon (BTS/NBTS) Circulation 
and Serials Librarian, The Seminary Library, 
BTS/NBTS 
L.T.A., College of DuPage. 



Elvire Hilgert O^^M) Public Seri'ice Librarian, 
jesuit-KrausS'McCormick Library 
B.A., Pacific Union College; M.S. in L.S., 
Catholic University of America; Study, 
Adventist Theological Seminary; University of 
the Philippines, Manila; University of Basel. 

Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. (CTU) Director of 
Library 

M.A.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois; Study, University of 
Detroit; Loyola University, Chicago; Saint 
Louis University, Spalding College. 



Donald W. Vorp (JKM) Director, jesuit-Krauss- 
McCormick Library 

B.A., Roberts Wesleyan College; B.D., Asbury 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., Drew 
University. 

Murray L. Wagner (BTS/NBTS) Director 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary Col- 
lege. 



84 



the Chicago cluster 
oP theological schools 




Bethany Theological Seminary- 
Catholic Theological Union- 
Chicago Theological Seminary- 
Jesuit House (Cluster Office)- 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago- 
McCormick Theological Seminary- 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School- 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary- 




OAK BROOK-LOMBARD AREA 




PREFERRED ROUTES 
FROM HYDE PARK 



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